HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Does a pair of $600 skates make THAT MUCH of a difference then a $200 pair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
02-29-2012, 10:41 AM
  #51
Devil Dancer
Registered User
 
Devil Dancer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 11,825
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
okay, so your advice is for beginners, got it
Definitely, not intended for advanced skaters.

Devil Dancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 10:52 AM
  #52
CornKicker
Locked Out
 
CornKicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 6,362
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoninNYR View Post
Do expensive skates last longer than mid level one's?

I am a very strong skater, i use a 7/16 or 3/8 @ 6ft 200lbs and my skates seem to breakdown after about 2 years but i really do put some force on them...
ive had my graf 705's for 8 years and they are still in great shape

CornKicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 12:21 PM
  #53
r3cc0s
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 411
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by CornKicker View Post
ive had my graf 705's for 8 years and they are still in great shape
I think traditional quality skates like the Tacks 1152 or Pro-tacks, Bauer Supreme Custom (5000 series) and the 700 series graf, which have been around forever, will last longer than the current composite boot

My 9k's are wearing and I can feel flexion in the boot where I shouldn't or hadn't before

I've heard S15/S11 skates breaking dowen, I've heard that the One90 skate was more durable than the latest supreme...

but you get a much lighter boot than even the Grafs.

r3cc0s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 01:16 PM
  #54
nystromshairstylist
Scoring at will
 
nystromshairstylist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: On the perimeter
Country: Barbados
Posts: 688
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3cc0s View Post
I think traditional quality skates like the Tacks 1152 or Pro-tacks, Bauer Supreme Custom (5000 series) and the 700 series graf, which have been around forever, will last longer than the current composite boot

My 9k's are wearing and I can feel flexion in the boot where I shouldn't or hadn't before

I've heard S15/S11 skates breaking dowen, I've heard that the One90 skate was more durable than the latest supreme...

but you get a much lighter boot than even the Grafs.
Just to hijack the thread a bit, but even between $600 and $700 skates there could be a difference. I skated one night last week at an OH wearing my Graf G70s, and then put on my G75s for the first time at a public skate and the difference in weight/feel was astronomical. Even a friend of mine watching at the public skate said I seemed faster in the 75s.

It feels like going from cement shoes to ballet slippers, the difference is that huge.

nystromshairstylist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 01:51 PM
  #55
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,530
vCash: 500
I'd consider that a newer model.

Jarick is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 02:14 PM
  #56
Stickmata
Registered User
 
Stickmata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,489
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
that would be the end result after a lot of practice and ice time.

Starting out, the blades should be perpendicular, then as you get more comfortable and stronger with the technique then you get into a deeper angle for faster stops.
Not trying to be an argumentative ***** (seriously I'm not), but I don't agree with this. When a beginner is learning to stop, starting with snow plows, then one skate plows then to a full hockey stop, I think it is much easier to learn with a little more angle to it. Staying too upright makes it harder to balance and sometimes go out the front. Any of the 'learn to stop' videos I've ever seen using the progressive method have all shown a healthy angle to the blade.

IMO, the biggest issue most beginners have with stopping has nothing to do with blade angle/position and everything to do with body position (knees, hips and chest).

Stickmata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 02:39 PM
  #57
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,530
vCash: 500
This is getting off-topic, but when I was learning to stop on my weak foot, I adapted the mentality of "turn and sit". Meaning I would glide, then turn and bend knees/sit butt down.

Eventually I learned that the faster you go, the more you have to lean away from the stop. And then I got more and more comfortable until it became second nature.

Jarick is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 02:46 PM
  #58
BigDuke6
Registered User
 
BigDuke6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Inside
Country: United States
Posts: 83
vCash: 500
I started skating last summer, and have been using One60's since I started. I've been pondering upgrading them, but I only get to the rink a couple of times a week and I'm not sure it is really worth it. The skates are holding up fine, I've just been wondering if a higher end skate would help me get better. I think more ice time would be the best solution.

BigDuke6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 02:59 PM
  #59
Stories
Hockey scientist
 
Stories's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Bethesda, MD
Country: United States
Posts: 6,288
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeymass View Post
I'm curious how they made a difference.



When you say stability, what do you mean? I would definitely upgrade from the Silver Edition, but you don't need to go crazy and buy TotalOnes.
Any time I would do crossovers or do any move that required a lot of edge work, I felt so much more stable/comfortable in the rentals/borrowers.

Stories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 03:06 PM
  #60
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,530
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDuke6 View Post
I started skating last summer, and have been using One60's since I started. I've been pondering upgrading them, but I only get to the rink a couple of times a week and I'm not sure it is really worth it. The skates are holding up fine, I've just been wondering if a higher end skate would help me get better. I think more ice time would be the best solution.
If they fit well you should be fine, so long as they're still stiff. They are good skates.

Jarick is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 03:09 PM
  #61
vwg*
Scoring Not Allowed
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Krasnoyarsk
Country: Russian Federation
Posts: 19,957
vCash: 500
If you're not playing college, high-level juniors or pros: no, they don't really at all. The difference would be negligible, especially at the price. If you have the money to splurge for nicer skates, then by all means go for it. I break other equipment way too often to afford an expensive pair of skates. Mid-level skates in the $150-250 price range last me at least 2-3 years.

vwg* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 03:11 PM
  #62
Stickmata
Registered User
 
Stickmata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,489
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
This is getting off-topic, but when I was learning to stop on my weak foot, I adapted the mentality of "turn and sit". Meaning I would glide, then turn and bend knees/sit butt down.

Eventually I learned that the faster you go, the more you have to lean away from the stop. And then I got more and more comfortable until it became second nature.
Similar thing here. After I suffered nerve damage in my left leg and lost muscle memory, I had to relearn how to stop on that foot. Helped me to think about throwing my butt out and sliding into a seated position. Allowed me to relearn the feel for the edges on that skate.

Stickmata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 03:16 PM
  #63
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,530
vCash: 500
Right and to be clear, that was just how I learned the feel for the edges and balance, not necessarily proper technique.

Jarick is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 03:35 PM
  #64
hockeymass
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 610
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stories View Post
Any time I would do crossovers or do any move that required a lot of edge work, I felt so much more stable/comfortable in the rentals/borrowers.
Sounds like your boots either don't give enough support or are breaking down, or the blades aren't sharpened right.

hockeymass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 03:48 PM
  #65
Stickmata
Registered User
 
Stickmata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,489
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Right and to be clear, that was just how I learned the feel for the edges and balance, not necessarily proper technique.
Yup, same. It was that 'over exaggeration' so to speak that allowed me to get over that initial hurdle of having no feel to having some feel and being to at least do an ugly stop. From there I refined it. Now I stop better on that side than I do on my 'strong' side.

Stickmata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 05:25 PM
  #66
nullterm
Registered User
 
nullterm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port Moody, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,541
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
Not trying to be an argumentative ***** (seriously I'm not), but I don't agree with this. When a beginner is learning to stop, starting with snow plows, then one skate plows then to a full hockey stop, I think it is much easier to learn with a little more angle to it. Staying too upright makes it harder to balance and sometimes go out the front. Any of the 'learn to stop' videos I've ever seen using the progressive method have all shown a healthy angle to the blade.

IMO, the biggest issue most beginners have with stopping has nothing to do with blade angle/position and everything to do with body position (knees, hips and chest).
I'm going to partially disagree, partially agree. Speaking as someone who learned to properly stop in the last five years as an adult.

Yes, it is about body position and angle. But by starting off easy with a vertical angle to get used to the snow plow, it gives the player a chance to develop the necessary ankle strength, confidence, balance, muscle memory to eventually develop the proper body position. The near vertical blade gives you a wider margin for error which is what you want starting out.

That was my first hand experience. I learned proper stops from my power skating instructor, soon as he told me about the blade angle to start out, it got alot easier as far as learning to stop, then just became about repetition and practice.

Now I'm at a point where I can do a hockey stop at full speed in a deep angle no problem, either foot, two footed or just on one.

nullterm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-29-2012, 10:07 PM
  #67
hyster110
Registered User
 
hyster110's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 838
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by visor wearing goon View Post
If you're not playing college, high-level juniors or pros: no, they don't really at all. The difference would be negligible, especially at the price. If you have the money to splurge for nicer skates, then by all means go for it. I break other equipment way too often to afford an expensive pair of skates. Mid-level skates in the $150-250 price range last me at least 2-3 years.

thats you though, i took a 300 pair of skates and they were work out in less then a year, moved to 500 dollar grafs and they wore out in less than 12 month. thank god the owner of the shop new me and rebuilt them free of charge. they lasted me another two and a half years but now they are soft.


for me i needed a stiffer book so i went custom and got pro stiff level. it depends on need along with price range that should be noted

hyster110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 08:32 AM
  #68
Stories
Hockey scientist
 
Stories's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Bethesda, MD
Country: United States
Posts: 6,288
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeymass View Post
Sounds like your boots either don't give enough support or are breaking down, or the blades aren't sharpened right.
I think the sharpening is okay. That doesn't feel much different than anything else. I just wonder if this is the cost of having really crummy skates, and it's time to get a better pair that is better suited to my improve abilities (these are the same skates I used when I first learned how to skate, a $40 pair).

Stories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 08:34 AM
  #69
livingminimal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 51
vCash: 500
This thread is cracking me up.
No, not you, or anyone else on this board needs the most high-end skates possible.
After 25 years of playing, all I've realized I need is a skate that fits and is well-constructed, relatively light made by a reputable brand, and it makes no difference if that skate is from 2012 or 2007. Losing 20grams will make no difference for anyone, ever. I actually think Graf makes the best skates, and they've done less in terms of "innovation" (i.e.: Marketing) than Bauer or RBK.

Skating is about technique. It can be coached, but really, in many ways, it's derivative of talent.

livingminimal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 08:37 AM
  #70
hockeymass
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 610
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by livingminimal View Post
This thread is cracking me up.
No, not you, or anyone else on this board needs the most high-end skates possible.
After 25 years of playing, all I've realized I need is a skate that fits and is well-constructed, relatively light made by a reputable brand, and it makes no difference if that skate is from 2012 or 2007. Losing 20grams will make no difference for anyone, ever. I actually think Graf makes the best skates, and they've done less in terms of "innovation" (i.e.: Marketing) than Bauer or RBK.

Skating is about technique. It can be coached, but really, in many ways, it's derivative of talent.
Which is what most people in this thread are saying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stories View Post
I think the sharpening is okay. That doesn't feel much different than anything else. I just wonder if this is the cost of having really crummy skates, and it's time to get a better pair that is better suited to my improve abilities (these are the same skates I used when I first learned how to skate, a $40 pair).
If your boots feel worse than rental boots, yeah, it's past time to get new skates. Go to a reputable shop and get someone with experience to recommend a solid pair that fits you right.

I recently bought new skates because my old pair was hurting my instep. The guy at the store could have suggested $600 X7.0s or One100s or U+CLs, but he set me up with a pair of U+06s for $200 bucks that are the most comfortable skates I've ever worn.

hockeymass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 09:20 AM
  #71
Stories
Hockey scientist
 
Stories's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Bethesda, MD
Country: United States
Posts: 6,288
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeymass View Post
Which is what most people in this thread are saying.



If your boots feel worse than rental boots, yeah, it's past time to get new skates. Go to a reputable shop and get someone with experience to recommend a solid pair that fits you right.

I recently bought new skates because my old pair was hurting my instep. The guy at the store could have suggested $600 X7.0s or One100s or U+CLs, but he set me up with a pair of U+06s for $200 bucks that are the most comfortable skates I've ever worn.
Damn. I guess I've been using bad/poor fitting skates for a while now. My instep always had some discomfort--just figured that was something that all skates had.

Guess it's time to try a new pair of skates.

Stories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 10:01 AM
  #72
vwg*
Scoring Not Allowed
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Krasnoyarsk
Country: Russian Federation
Posts: 19,957
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyster110 View Post
thats you though, i took a 300 pair of skates and they were work out in less then a year, moved to 500 dollar grafs and they wore out in less than 12 month. thank god the owner of the shop new me and rebuilt them free of charge. they lasted me another two and a half years but now they are soft.


for me i needed a stiffer book so i went custom and got pro stiff level. it depends on need along with price range that should be noted
Well, yeah, it depends. If you're a bigger guy, mid-level skates aren't going to hold up as long or as well as they do with average/smaller guys. I'm about average, so I was just giving advice from my point of view. But yeah, if you're 200+ lb guy, you can and most likely will go through skates often.

vwg* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 10:53 AM
  #73
AIREAYE
Moderator
 
AIREAYE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: China
Posts: 3,298
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by livingminimal View Post
This thread is cracking me up.
No, not you, or anyone else on this board needs the most high-end skates possible.
After 25 years of playing, all I've realized I need is a skate that fits and is well-constructed, relatively light made by a reputable brand, and it makes no difference if that skate is from 2012 or 2007. Losing 20grams will make no difference for anyone, ever. I actually think Graf makes the best skates, and they've done less in terms of "innovation" (i.e.: Marketing) than Bauer or RBK.

Skating is about technique. It can be coached, but really, in many ways, it's derivative of talent.
That is what we've been saying for three pages now...

AIREAYE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 11:16 AM
  #74
sanityplease
Registered User
 
sanityplease's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: Canada
Posts: 756
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3cc0s View Post
I think traditional quality skates like the Tacks 1152 or Pro-tacks, Bauer Supreme Custom (5000 series) and the 700 series graf, which have been around forever, will last longer than the current composite boot

My 9k's are wearing and I can feel flexion in the boot where I shouldn't or hadn't before

I've heard S15/S11 skates breaking dowen, I've heard that the One90 skate was more durable than the latest supreme...

but you get a much lighter boot than even the Grafs.
I'd pay $600 for a new pair of 1152's in a second, man I loved those skates, talk about durablility.

sanityplease is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-01-2012, 11:27 AM
  #75
hockeymass
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 610
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanityplease View Post
I'd pay $600 for a new pair of 1152's in a second, man I loved those skates, talk about durablility.
I've got 10 year old Pro Tacks that, save for a bit of frayed stitching and a whole lot of scuffs, you'd swear were brand new. I had to replace the holders, but that's more because the ProLites were terrible.

hockeymass is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:54 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.