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It's been 40 years since the last Moon Mission

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Old
03-18-2012, 06:01 PM
  #26
LatvianTwist
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Also, more research is coming out about the health effects of prolonged exposure to low gravity, and it's not good news. Along with higher radiation exposure (compared to the Earth's surface) and problems with bone and muscle loss, they're finding, for example, that the back of the eyeball becomes somewhat flattened, which isn't good. Plus, you might fart a lot. That doesn't mean we should give up on manned spaceflight, but it's certainly food for thought.
The boys at Pixar really did their research. In "Wall-e", what happens to pretty much everyone (you'd know if you saw it) is what'd actually happen with prolonged exposure.

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Old
03-18-2012, 06:40 PM
  #27
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Originally Posted by ixcuincle View Post
Going to the moon is expensive.
Keeping up maintainence on shuttles is hard too, then add in the fact that people have pretty much discovered all we needed to know about the moon. It's a barren rock. it's interesting the first few times, but there's really nothing else to discover.

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03-18-2012, 06:59 PM
  #28
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Heard somewhere that humans know more about space than the bottom of our oceans...

If this is true, why don't we finish discovering our planet before we discover other planets?

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03-18-2012, 07:02 PM
  #29
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Heard somewhere that humans know more about space than the bottom of our oceans...

If this is true, why don't we finish discovering our planet before we discover other planets?
We don't even know everything about ourselves, yet.

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03-18-2012, 07:02 PM
  #30
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To add on to the complications associated with the moon, the dust on the moons surface causes a lot of health problems if it gets in your lungs.

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Old
03-18-2012, 07:10 PM
  #31
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To add on to the complications associated with the moon, the dust on the moons surface causes a lot of health problems if it gets in your lungs.
Not to mention you can hurt your knee really bad if you trip there.

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03-18-2012, 07:18 PM
  #32
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Originally Posted by tikkanen5rings View Post
Not to mention you can hurt your knee really bad if you trip there.
Luckily the lack of gravity slows everything down therefore Earth Trip pain > Moon Trip Pain

Also, the dust has the ability to tear through Kevlar.

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Old
03-18-2012, 07:33 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by LatvianTwist View Post
We don't even know everything about ourselves, yet.
Yep.


IIRC, the human brain (barring any undiscovered extraterrestrial civilization) is more complicated than anything in this arm of the galaxy.

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Old
03-18-2012, 08:36 PM
  #34
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We don't have a need to go to the moon anymore.

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Old
03-18-2012, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Bob Richards View Post
Luckily the lack of gravity slows everything down therefore Earth Trip pain > Moon Trip Pain

Also, the dust has the ability to tear through Kevlar.
Yea true. All the dust and rocks on the moon don't have to go through the weathering process like they do at earth, so their edges are jagged and sharp.

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Old
03-18-2012, 08:50 PM
  #36
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Yep.


IIRC, the human brain (barring any undiscovered extraterrestrial civilization) is more complicated than anything in this arm of the galaxy.
I think it's kind of foolish to be absolute about something like that.

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03-18-2012, 08:51 PM
  #37
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Originally Posted by MrFunnyWobbl View Post
Heard somewhere that humans know more about space than the bottom of our oceans...

If this is true, why don't we finish discovering our planet before we discover other planets?
Why can't we do both at the same time?

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Old
03-18-2012, 08:58 PM
  #38
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Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 View Post
I think it's kind of foolish to be absolute about something like that.
Why?

Stars, planets, and other celestial bodies are relatively 'simple'.

That's why "barring any undiscovered extraterrestrial civilization" is there. That condition makes it pretty not-absolute.



http://www.princeton.edu/pr/home/00/...ain/hmcap.html

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Old
03-18-2012, 09:07 PM
  #39
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Why?

Stars, planets, and other celestial bodies are relatively 'simple'.

That's why "barring any undiscovered extraterrestrial civilization" is there. That condition makes it pretty not-absolute.



http://www.princeton.edu/pr/home/00/...ain/hmcap.html
Grant Steen said it is "likely" that it is the most complex thing. He also said it is virtually impossible to actually measure 'complexity.' Regardless, that is just one man's opinion.

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Old
03-18-2012, 09:30 PM
  #40
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Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 View Post
Grant Steen said it is "likely" that it is the most complex thing. He also said it is virtually impossible to actually measure 'complexity.' Regardless, that is just one man's opinion.
Ehh, fair. I concede (don't really care all that much )




The point is that our own brain is really complicated compared to the moon.

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Old
03-19-2012, 03:26 AM
  #41
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In my opinion the problems isn't about getting back to the moon with skeptics wonder what value there could possibly be there. I don't like the concept but maybe they're right. Rather it's after the huge leap forward we took in getting to the moon that we've achieved so little in space exploration/travel since. That's what really stings, and I don't know if it's really true but progress seemed to stop once we stopped going to the moon so that's the concept we tend to latch onto when wondering why we can't resume progress.

Just consider what the popular culture of the time thought the future progress of space travel would hold, like in 1968 with Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey or even into the early 80's with in 1982 Ridley Scott's Blade Runner (set in the year 2018 I think). Yeah we have some cool toys these days but personally I really hope we get to see some significant advances in space travel before I grow old and die.

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03-19-2012, 08:19 AM
  #42
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Originally Posted by RandV View Post
In my opinion the problems isn't about getting back to the moon with skeptics wonder what value there could possibly be there. I don't like the concept but maybe they're right. Rather it's after the huge leap forward we took in getting to the moon that we've achieved so little in space exploration/travel since. That's what really stings, and I don't know if it's really true but progress seemed to stop once we stopped going to the moon so that's the concept we tend to latch onto when wondering why we can't resume progress.
Space exploration was largely pushed by the Cold War.

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Old
03-19-2012, 10:08 AM
  #43
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Because it was boring.

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Old
03-19-2012, 10:51 AM
  #44
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Originally Posted by MP View Post
Along with higher radiation exposure (compared to the Earth's surface) and problems with bone and muscle loss, they're finding, for example, that the back of the eyeball becomes somewhat flattened, which isn't good. Plus, you might fart a lot.
Perfect ... a new propulsion method.

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Old
03-19-2012, 11:05 AM
  #45
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Actually our last mission was Apollo 18. I don't think anyone can dispute that new found footage.

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Old
03-19-2012, 12:49 PM
  #46
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Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 View Post
Space exploration was largely pushed by the Cold War.
This.

I think manned space exploration is as cool as the next guy but the bottom line is that it's just not practical right now. Unfortunately, this type of [expensive] science is not sustainable if there is not a commercial demand for it, especially with the current economic landscape.

Now, if they found vast reserves of oil on Mars, for example, that would be a different story. But that's not going to happen.

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03-19-2012, 01:09 PM
  #47
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Making the money available to get to the moon could be considered a propaganda campaign, but the labour and efforts of the engineers and scientists that actually made it happen were 100% genuine and real.
Not denying the moon landings happened, but the whole point of them was to "beat the commies" by getting there first.

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Old
03-19-2012, 02:07 PM
  #48
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Why? Because NASA has a fraction of the budget now compared to what they had when the Apollo missions were ongoing, and are being asked to do more with less every day. To give you an idea, during the height of the race to the moon, NASA's budget was 4.41% of the federal budget. At this moment, it's 0.48%: less than half a penny on the dollar.

However, with that 0.48%, NASA is currently working on new projects such as the James Webb Space Telescope (Hubble's eventual replacement) and receiving/interpreting data from a slew of other projects such as:

Landsat 5 and 7
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Opportunity (Mars rover)
Mars Science Laboratory (currently en route)
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter
Spitzer
Cassini
Dawn
New Horizons
Messenger
SOHO
Stereo
Solar Dynamics Observatory
Chandra
WMAP
GLAST
Rosetta
Planck
CloudSat
Mars Express
Herschel

and many, many more, including a host of earth observation satellites. They're stretched thin and have had their budget cut almost systematically since the end of the cold war, despite having nearly unanimous public support in the goals and objectives set forth.

So if you have a problem with NASA not expanding the human frontier, talk to your representatives.

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Old
03-19-2012, 02:13 PM
  #49
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I think those solar sail things are freaking awesome.

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Old
03-24-2012, 11:42 AM
  #50
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Good discussion. I'd just like to restate a couple of points already mentioned:

1. Space exploration has a significant parallels with polar exploration in that much of it was politically motivated. For example, the Northwest Passage was key for the British not only because of the perceived economic benefits, but because of Russia's dominance around Beringia. Similarily, the Cold War easily explains the push in the 60s to dominate space before the other guy. Fortunately or unfortunately, the Cold War paradigm in current geopolitics has been replaced by globalization, which explains the different relationship the US has with China.

2. Domestic troubles in the US are devoting resources and attention away from space exploration. Not only do the Americans lack vision within the administration itself, but society in general is distracted from the relationship between pure and applied science. This is made especially clear when anyone questions the value of going into space, human or robotic. The return on investment for the scientific and technical capital is staggering - and people bemoan that you can no longer make $20/hr assembling vacuum cleaners in Peoria.

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