HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

The Hockey Noob Chronicles

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old
04-06-2012, 04:21 PM
  #1176
ganave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 117
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copeland View Post
Ganave, I'm glad to hear you'll be chronicling your journey on here. Please be thorough!!! Lol it'll be nice to have for when I make the switch once I'm ready
Ha, thanks. I'll be sure to keep posting. Tomorrow is my last skating lesson, learning to do alternating crossovers on both legs On Sunday I'll begin practicing c-cuts on one skate, should be good for a laugh.

I'm about halfway through "Hockey Goaltending" edited by Brian Daccord. It has a LOT of good information. It is amazingly thorough and up to date. My gym routine is going to get an overhaul.

I'll hopefully get my chest/arm protector tomorrow from a Play it Again Sports.

I'll be leaving for a road trip through Ohio, St. Louis and Chicago from Boston next Friday for 10 days. I'll have a week of free skating and then I should suit up for my instructional league on May 7th

ganave is offline  
Old
04-07-2012, 12:00 AM
  #1177
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
That's really neat that you found an instructional league. I'm sure you'll have a great time!! Haha. Also, is the Hockey Goaltending manual the one that was beta'd on the Goalie Store forum? If so, yeah, I remember I read through some of it when I was starting to play net in ball hockey and it was really good.

Well, have fun on your road trip and hope skating goes well.

Copeland is offline  
Old
04-07-2012, 11:36 PM
  #1178
ganave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 117
vCash: 500
Finished my last Ice Skating 101 class

I did however get an achievement! As soon as I finished the last session I saw a flash of light in the upper right corner of my vision.

Achievement Unlocked: Ice Skating Achievement

I have attached proof of my awesome achievement!

http://imgur.com/wB9OI

I did a lot of work on c-cuts today. They are really hard in goalie skates. You have to explode off the cutting skate with your weight on it.

I can do alternating crossovers pretty easily as well. I thought it was going to be really hard, but it wasn't so bad.

Next up is c-cuts on one leg. No luck on the chest protector this weekend, so those are going to wait until I get back. I tried one legged c-cuts today and wow, they are really hard. Took a lot of spills and landed pretty hard a few times.

I'm always amused when the head instructor who is a figure skater floats around the 4 groups is like, "What skates is he wearing? Why are they flat?"

ganave is offline  
Old
04-11-2012, 03:25 PM
  #1179
Justin65
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Country: United States
Posts: 18
vCash: 500
So, after about 2 months of having fun playing hockey, my time playing this Spring and my time as a civilian is coming to an end. Next week, I'll be heading out west for about 7 months for training and was wondering the best way to store my gear long-term. I feel like it would be bad to leave it all in my bag, but I also don't want it stinking up my parent's house while I'm away. I figure I'm going to give it all a good cleaning and then leave out to air and stay dry. I'm just wondering if there are any concerns about where I store the gear so it stays in good condition until I get back.

Justin65 is offline  
Old
04-11-2012, 06:54 PM
  #1180
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Justin, I found if you have a furnace room that can be used as storage, that the gear loses its smell pretty quickly if you leave it in there. I left gross outdoor ball hockey goalie gear (read: sweat, dirt, and LOTS of rain...) in there for about 2mos while I went off on a trip and came back to it all nice, dry, and unsmelly LOL

edit: I should add I left it out in the open, no bag

Copeland is offline  
Old
04-11-2012, 10:14 PM
  #1181
Wilch
Unregistered User
 
Wilch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under your bed
Country: Taiwan
Posts: 8,906
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copeland View Post
Justin, I found if you have a furnace room that can be used as storage, that the gear loses its smell pretty quickly if you leave it in there. I left gross outdoor ball hockey goalie gear (read: sweat, dirt, and LOTS of rain...) in there for about 2mos while I went off on a trip and came back to it all nice, dry, and unsmelly LOL

edit: I should add I left it out in the open, no bag
2 months is a long time. As long as you leave out in an open, dry space, it should air out pretty quickly.

Wilch is online now  
Old
04-12-2012, 11:36 AM
  #1182
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Haha I suppose.

Copeland is offline  
Old
04-12-2012, 12:53 PM
  #1183
ganave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 117
vCash: 500
I just found out that the ice rink near where I live is not going to have just 1 adult instructional class and 1 scrimmage a week, but 3 classes and 2 scrimmages!

9 to 11 on Sundays, 10 to 11 on Wednesdays and 8 to 10 on Fridays.

Going to be an awesome May.

ganave is offline  
Old
04-12-2012, 01:14 PM
  #1184
neksys
Registered User
 
neksys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,398
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin65 View Post
So, after about 2 months of having fun playing hockey, my time playing this Spring and my time as a civilian is coming to an end. Next week, I'll be heading out west for about 7 months for training and was wondering the best way to store my gear long-term. I feel like it would be bad to leave it all in my bag, but I also don't want it stinking up my parent's house while I'm away. I figure I'm going to give it all a good cleaning and then leave out to air and stay dry. I'm just wondering if there are any concerns about where I store the gear so it stays in good condition until I get back.
If you dry everything really well and put it in the bag, it should be fine. I've heard of people throwing a deodorant ball in there and a pantyhose with a few cups of kitty litter in there.

The deodorant is obvious, but the kitty litter absorbs any extra moisture - no moisture, no smell - and no breakdown of the equipment either.

neksys is offline  
Old
04-12-2012, 03:31 PM
  #1185
Justin65
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Country: United States
Posts: 18
vCash: 500
Thanks for the advice. I'd heard to keep my gear out in the open for storage, but I know my parents don't want a bunch of hockey gear spread out all over my room for 7 months, but I also didn't want to get back and have all of my pads breaking down or in bad condition. The kitty litter suggestion is a good one since I have a cat, but I'm gonna get some strange looks asking for a pair of pantyhose.

Justin65 is offline  
Old
04-12-2012, 06:58 PM
  #1186
Henrik Datsyukstrom
Registered User
 
Henrik Datsyukstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 194
vCash: 500
Hey everybody,

I guess I'll be telling my story here too so I can get some advice from those of you who have been fortunate enough to be in the game longer than myself.

Last year I went skating for the first time since I was about 12 (I'm 21 now). It felt completely foreign to me, and I was determined to learn to do some basic hockey skating this year. A few months back I started going to the local open skate twice a week. I got stopping down really good with my right foor in front after 3 weeks or so. I'm still pretty terrible at stopping in the other direction.

Im actually pretty damn good at skating backwords, and over the past few weeks I've been able to incorporate backwards crossovers into my starts to get power. This is probably my greatest strength, which is good because I'd love to play defense.

I purchased a helmet, gloves, and an Easton S7 Stealth Stick (85 flex, Sakic Curve RH) so I could go to a sticks and pucks session. I went to my first sticks and pucks, and it was quite the eye opener. I've watched some videos on proper shooting technique, and I thought it would be much easier than it really was. I have 180lbs of grip strength in my lower hand, and 160lbs on my top hand. Those are exceptional levels of forearm strength, so I thought I'd be able to get some decent power behind my shots.

When I got to shooting, however, my shots were pretty abysmal, which I know is due to a lack of proper technique. Some missed way wide, some stayed on the ice, and a few even went so high that they hit the netting above the glass (and I was shooting from the hash marks). Every once in a while, I'd get a really good shot off with some zip to it and accuracy, but I couldn't replicate it. I think my problem is that I wasn't getting the puck to spin by rolling the puck from heel to toe. I just couldn't get the feel to that process.

EDIT: I realized when I was on the ice that I couldn't flex the stick like I can just in my room. It just slides on the ice when I try to flex it. I might not be pressing down hard enough, and instead just pressing forward.

I ended up playing some 3v3 and 4v4 with others who were there, and they were all completely cool with the fact that I was just starting off. For the most part I just made sure to not be selfish and to get back on D since I didn't have much to offer offensively. I got the feel for receiving passes, even though I completely missed some. I made a lot of passes way too far ahead, but I also connected on some really good ones, though they were weak in power.

I played on the left side for the most part, which was pretty uncomfortable since I can only comfortably stop with my right foot forward, turning left. I think this will come in time however, especially if I force myself to play on the left side.

I wish I had the time to take classes and whatnot, but it really isn't a viable option for me until the fall, if ever. Do you think playing casual games at S&P is a good way to slowly learn the game? I definitely want to go at least once a week if I can make it out.


Last edited by Henrik Datsyukstrom: 04-12-2012 at 07:04 PM.
Henrik Datsyukstrom is offline  
Old
04-12-2012, 07:27 PM
  #1187
AIREAYE
Moderator
 
AIREAYE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: China
Posts: 3,553
vCash: 500
Haha, you will never ever use the same motion to flex a stick on dryland when on ice. It's a completely different motion.

AIREAYE is offline  
Old
04-13-2012, 06:43 AM
  #1188
Wilch
Unregistered User
 
Wilch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under your bed
Country: Taiwan
Posts: 8,906
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ganave View Post
Finished my last Ice Skating 101 class

I did however get an achievement! As soon as I finished the last session I saw a flash of light in the upper right corner of my vision.

Achievement Unlocked: Ice Skating Achievement

I have attached proof of my awesome achievement!

http://imgur.com/wB9OI

I did a lot of work on c-cuts today. They are really hard in goalie skates. You have to explode off the cutting skate with your weight on it.

I can do alternating crossovers pretty easily as well. I thought it was going to be really hard, but it wasn't so bad.

Next up is c-cuts on one leg. No luck on the chest protector this weekend, so those are going to wait until I get back. I tried one legged c-cuts today and wow, they are really hard. Took a lot of spills and landed pretty hard a few times.

I'm always amused when the head instructor who is a figure skater floats around the 4 groups is like, "What skates is he wearing? Why are they flat?"
This reminds me of a drill I saw before.

Saw some kid with one skate on a puck, the other doing c-cuts. Surprisingly hard to do.

Wilch is online now  
Old
04-13-2012, 02:26 PM
  #1189
qmechanic
Registered User
 
qmechanic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Country: United States
Posts: 99
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrik Datsyukstrom View Post
Im actually pretty damn good at skating backwords, and over the past few weeks I've been able to incorporate backwards crossovers into my starts to get power.
Actually, several Division I players have told me not to use backwards crossovers in starts. They say it slows you down. You use backwards crossovers if you're trying to move laterally across the rink, but if you just want to do a quick start, you're better off doing a c-cut.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrik Datsyukstrom View Post
EDIT: I realized when I was on the ice that I couldn't flex the stick like I can just in my room. It just slides on the ice when I try to flex it. I might not be pressing down hard enough, and instead just pressing forward.
I had this problem, too. I would practice shooting on dryland off a board and everything seemed to be clicking. Then I'd go shoot on the ice and my shot would fail. You have way more friction on dryland, so the puck stays on your blade a lot longer, compared to the ice. I'm not sure about the flexing part, but I've found that when you take shots on the ice, your timing has to be very very fast. The whole motion where you open the blade and snap your wrists has to be super quick and almost violent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrik Datsyukstrom View Post
Do you think playing casual games at S&P is a good way to slowly learn the game? I definitely want to go at least once a week if I can make it out.
Pickups are a great way to improve... as long as the other people there know what they're doing! Hopefully, the people there are nice about playing with beginners. It wouldn't be much fun if no one ever passed to you, but even then, you can still work on positioning and defensive play.

qmechanic is offline  
Old
04-14-2012, 12:22 AM
  #1190
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
You know. I've been thinking. I think I made a mistake not going the 'straight to goalie' route.

Invested too much into player gear now to turn around. :/

Well, let that be a lesson to any clueless aspiring goalies who might drop by here.

Edit: sorry to go off on a tangent from whats currently being discussed lol

Copeland is offline  
Old
04-14-2012, 01:41 AM
  #1191
beth
Registered User
 
beth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Bellevue, WA
Country: United States
Posts: 539
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
This reminds me of a drill I saw before.

Saw some kid with one skate on a puck, the other doing c-cuts. Surprisingly hard to do.

This exercise is brutal! Either your muscles are killing you or you're falling on your ass.

beth is offline  
Old
04-14-2012, 03:10 AM
  #1192
Wilch
Unregistered User
 
Wilch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under your bed
Country: Taiwan
Posts: 8,906
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copeland View Post
You know. I've been thinking. I think I made a mistake not going the 'straight to goalie' route.

Invested too much into player gear now to turn around. :/

Well, let that be a lesson to any clueless aspiring goalies who might drop by here.

Edit: sorry to go off on a tangent from whats currently being discussed lol
Sell your gear and buy 2nd hand.

Wilch is online now  
Old
04-14-2012, 11:50 AM
  #1193
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Well, I didn't just mean money investment. Some of it was a gift from family and selling it off would make things complicated. I don't know.

Copeland is offline  
Old
04-14-2012, 12:36 PM
  #1194
Wilch
Unregistered User
 
Wilch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under your bed
Country: Taiwan
Posts: 8,906
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copeland View Post
Well, I didn't just mean money investment. Some of it was a gift from family and selling it off would make things complicated. I don't know.
"The money value of your gift meant a lot to me, thanks"

In all seriousness, I know plenty of players who plays and has goalie and skater gear. If money and storage space isn't a problem... You could always buy 2nd handed.

Wilch is online now  
Old
04-14-2012, 01:18 PM
  #1195
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
ARGH. I had a great, detailed post and then I hit the back button accidentally.... O.o

So anyway, if I were to get gear, even used, it would have to wait til June when I'll have a little bit of a surplus. Some stuff won't be used though, *cough*skates*cough* as I've been having foot fit issues with my player skates...

So you think I should just suck it up and 'turn around' then? Another thing to take into account is that none of the teams in beginner divs are in need of goalies. On the other hand, there's always stick and puck sessions and drop-in hockey (even though I'd get murdered there! Lol).

Copeland is offline  
Old
04-14-2012, 10:53 PM
  #1196
thedonger
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 948
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by qmechanic View Post
Actually, several Division I players have told me not to use backwards crossovers in starts. They say it slows you down. You use backwards crossovers if you're trying to move laterally across the rink, but if you just want to do a quick start, you're better off doing a c-cut.



I had this problem, too. I would practice shooting on dryland off a board and everything seemed to be clicking. Then I'd go shoot on the ice and my shot would fail. You have way more friction on dryland, so the puck stays on your blade a lot longer, compared to the ice. I'm not sure about the flexing part, but I've found that when you take shots on the ice, your timing has to be very very fast. The whole motion where you open the blade and snap your wrists has to be super quick and almost violent.



Pickups are a great way to improve... as long as the other people there know what they're doing! Hopefully, the people there are nice about playing with beginners. It wouldn't be much fun if no one ever passed to you, but even then, you can still work on positioning and defensive play.
hmm, this is news to me. every upper level d-man you see from juniors to nhl does a crossover start when starting from a stand still. i just can't see how starting with straight up c-cuts could in any way be faster...maybe there's some sort of misinterpretation as the explosive backwards crossover start does begin with a a pretty hard c-cut.
here's what i'm talking about:


his initial c-cut is a bit smaller/shorter than i've usually heard recommended though.

thedonger is offline  
Old
04-14-2012, 11:18 PM
  #1197
qmechanic
Registered User
 
qmechanic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Country: United States
Posts: 99
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonger View Post
hmm, this is news to me. every upper level d-man you see from juniors to nhl does a crossover start when starting from a stand still. i just can't see how starting with straight up c-cuts could in any way be faster...maybe there's some sort of misinterpretation as the explosive backwards crossover start does begin with a a pretty hard c-cut.
Hmm, maybe what those Division I players meant is that it's dangerous to do a backwards crossover, because an attacker could blow past you. Here is what Laura Stamm says in her skating book:

Quote:
Some players like to use backward crossovers when skating backward. They feel they can go faster this way than when skating straight backward. However, backward crossovers can be dangerous when used improperly in game situations. Remember, defenders should never make the first move! Crossing over before the forward has committed to a direction translates to having made the first move.

Here are some examples of what can happen when a defender crosses over at the wrong time:

1) The forward with the puck races up the ice. The defender backs up, crossing over one way, then the other. Each backward crossover must be followed by a neutralizing step outward in the same direction in order to uncross the feet before the defender can take another step. The knowledgeable forward looks for this and immediately recognizes it as a great opportunity, quickly cuts the other way, and gets beyond the defender's reach.

2) The forward with the puck races up the ice. The defender backs up, planning to stay in front of the forward and prevent that forward from breaking free. The defender crosses over and puts his or her weight on the foot that crossed over. I call this the "pretzel syndrome" because the defender's feet are twisted like a pretzel. If the defender tries to cross the other foot over and go back in the original direction, it's a guaranteed fall. I've seen these blunders in critical games -- twice even in Stanley Cup final games. Both times these mistakes caused opportunities fro the forward; both times the forward scored the winning goal. Big mistake.

qmechanic is offline  
Old
04-15-2012, 12:14 AM
  #1198
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
You beat me to it. I was about to quote Laura Stamm lol

Copeland is offline  
Old
04-15-2012, 01:03 AM
  #1199
thedonger
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 948
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by qmechanic View Post
Hmm, maybe what those Division I players meant is that it's dangerous to do a backwards crossover, because an attacker could blow past you. Here is what Laura Stamm says in her skating book:
she's absolutely right...but your post was regarding backwards crossover starts which is where i think your current confusion is...not simply defending while backwards skating. it's basic knowledge for anyone above beginner level not to be doing backwards crossovers while you're engaged with your opponent(which is what laura stamm's comments are alluding to) as it not only drastically changes your center of gravity but telegraphs your next move.

the backwards crossover start is an absolute must in the toolbox of any upper level defender. it's for when you know the play will be going in the opposite direction. if the puck carrier is already engaged with you while at a stand still, either it means he's already by you or you're pretty much trailing the play...in either scenario, hopefully you're not gonna be skating backwards.

try comparing the backwards crossover start with the standard c-cut start and i guarantee you'll be 2-4 steps ahead with the crossover.

thedonger is offline  
Old
04-18-2012, 04:31 PM
  #1200
hockeymass
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 610
vCash: 500
I've been playing for a good long while, but I finally figured out how to blast good slappers on Monday. There's my noob chronicle.

hockeymass is offline  
Closed Thread

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:56 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.