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Those First Three Strides

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04-25-2012, 02:34 PM
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CunniJA
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Those First Three Strides

I was wondering what some people around here do to try to get a quick three or so strides to get going towards a puck. For example, I feel really slow getting to the puck when it hits into the boards in my defensive zone or getting strides going on a guy when a foot race starts up. Unfortunately, I was a distance runner, and I'm not naturally inclined towards this type of movement. But, I really want to improve it so that I can start winning chases to the puck in tight quarters.

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04-25-2012, 02:54 PM
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Droid6
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The obvious thing is not to skate too upright so you're always ready for nice deep strides. You may consider having your skates profiled to a minor forward or forward profile if you feel like you aren't getting the output you think you should be getting from your strides. If it's a strength or conditioning issue you just have to push yourself hard until your legs strengthen up.

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04-25-2012, 03:44 PM
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Gino 14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CunniJA View Post
I was wondering what some people around here do to try to get a quick three or so strides to get going towards a puck. For example, I feel really slow getting to the puck when it hits into the boards in my defensive zone or getting strides going on a guy when a foot race starts up. Unfortunately, I was a distance runner, and I'm not naturally inclined towards this type of movement. But, I really want to improve it so that I can start winning chases to the puck in tight quarters.
The time tested answer - power skating. It's all about technique. All the profiling and strength won't beat a solid skater with great technique.

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04-25-2012, 03:58 PM
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A lot of times when I'm trying to pick up speed I will do a few pushes with just my right foot as it is my stronger side. Anyone else do this? I know that Taylor Hall does as I saw Don Cherry break it down on a segment of Coaches Corner. What I take away from that is that Taylor and I are on the same level as far as skating goes.

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04-25-2012, 05:21 PM
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Do your start off with something tide to you, or a friend holding onto a rope around your waist. Should help in getting more leg strength,

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04-25-2012, 06:24 PM
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Saucy Dangles
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Have to agree on the power skating piece. Work on your V-Starts and rolling from your flats to your toes on your crossover starts. Allot of people who play this game forget that a good portion of skating is pure technique as well as repetitive motions. No work out in the gym, squats, will improve your physical technique on ice (it will only help with strength and fatigue). I will say this though step ladders and stuff like dry land drills that incorporate quick feet and read and react can actually help your foot work as well as reaction skills that can vastly improve your game. Also would recommend core training drills, as allot don't realize how much more explosive you can become with core training.

Heres a drill we use to do @ camp regularly. Its used by the pro's so you know its legit.
Like I stated earlier though, quick starts, from a slow glide or stop is really perfected with on Ice practice and maybe signing up for a legit power skating program.

Would recommend checking out this, Crash Training by Doug Crashley. Got to do a 2 week camp with him some years back when he was really getting involved with hockey players. Guys legit, and has some great strengthening techniques to make your more explosive as well as quick to read and react. Might want to look into camps like this if you can afford it. Luckly I was playing JR's @ the time, and it was covered by the team.
http://www.crashconditioning.com/

Triangle Drill:


Last edited by Saucy Dangles: 04-25-2012 at 06:30 PM.
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04-25-2012, 06:55 PM
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rinkrat22
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhSpF...2&feature=plcp

faster first three strides? try some of these.

I cant seem to get the video to load, so follow the link

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04-25-2012, 10:24 PM
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CunniJA
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Thanks for the feedback, guys. I would honestly say that my main issues are primarily technique related. I mean, I'm not Lance Armstrong or something, but years of running and soccer have given me strong legs. I've just never been good with explosive movement (must have a high percentage of slow-twitch fibers ). At the same time, I don't quite understand

I took what you guys said and focused a lot on bending my knees more, sometimes even more than is even really comfortable or useful at some times today, and that seemed to worked better for me. I'll work on those V-Starts and crossover starts as well. In fact, I've barely even tried starting from a crossover to get it done instead. I also think that triangle drill is cool. I'll also try giving that Taylor Hall thing a shot, what the hell, right? Do you guys feel like you get quicker starts when you go from a crossover to kick off your motion?

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04-26-2012, 12:31 AM
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Running and skating use different muscles. Skiing and biking are much better training than running.

And I know you'll hate it, but iron crosses. Lots and lots of iron crosses. Start in the middle of the circle, do crossovers straight left to the edge, stop, then back to center. Strong start to the top, stop, backwards crossover start to the center. Crossovers right, back to center. Backwards crossover start to the bottom, stop, start to center, stop.

Lots of those, and don't skimp. Go hard to the edges and put on a full, hard stop. One of the most hated drills, but you will get much more explosive starts in all directions.

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04-26-2012, 01:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Running and skating use different muscles. Skiing and biking are much better training than running.

And I know you'll hate it, but iron crosses. Lots and lots of iron crosses. Start in the middle of the circle, do crossovers straight left to the edge, stop, then back to center. Strong start to the top, stop, backwards crossover start to the center. Crossovers right, back to center. Backwards crossover start to the bottom, stop, start to center, stop.

Lots of those, and don't skimp. Go hard to the edges and put on a full, hard stop. One of the most hated drills, but you will get much more explosive starts in all directions.
Ugh we did this in my adult clinic... they hurt so much... definitely extremely helpful though. I've taken some nasty spills doing those things.

I never knew they were called "iron crosses" though. Interesting.

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04-26-2012, 02:39 AM
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Lonny Bohonos
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As a runner your inclination is slow and steady.

Hockey is anything but slow and steady so you have to train you muscles to react accordingly.

Obviously on ice is ideal however to really make an impact chances are like most people you will not get that ice time.

You will really need to do dry land training to make up for this. In fact dry land training can really benefit you as its easier to target specific muscles/movements.

Maybe look in to Peter Twists book called Complete Hockey Conditioning.

Id guess that doing some weight lifting as well as plyometrics and speed drills (ladders etc), plus doing running sprints would be what you are looking at.

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04-26-2012, 11:33 AM
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CunniJA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Running and skating use different muscles. Skiing and biking are much better training than running.

And I know you'll hate it, but iron crosses. Lots and lots of iron crosses. Start in the middle of the circle, do crossovers straight left to the edge, stop, then back to center. Strong start to the top, stop, backwards crossover start to the center. Crossovers right, back to center. Backwards crossover start to the bottom, stop, start to center, stop.

Lots of those, and don't skimp. Go hard to the edges and put on a full, hard stop. One of the most hated drills, but you will get much more explosive starts in all directions.
That sounds pretty cool to do. Also, I have started doing some sprints as the obvious way to try to get more speed.

One thing I hate is that it's hard for me to get on the ice, so the vast majority of my skating practice comes on roller rather than ice. I feel like it's not translating super well after my lasst drop in game.

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04-26-2012, 11:42 AM
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And don't forget that part of being quick to the puck has nothing to do with the physical side of things. It has to do with reading the play and knowing where the puck is likely to be before it gets there. Some of the best players I play with, who always seem to be around the puck, aren't very quick at all. They're just experienced and they read the play really, really well. Being on your toes mentally is at least as important as it is physically.

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04-26-2012, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by CunniJA View Post
That sounds pretty cool to do. Also, I have started doing some sprints as the obvious way to try to get more speed.

One thing I hate is that it's hard for me to get on the ice, so the vast majority of my skating practice comes on roller rather than ice. I feel like it's not translating super well after my lasst drop in game.
Roller and ice really don't work well together. Some of the basics are the same (crossovers, turning front to back back to front, etc...) but quick explosion moves certainly not.

There are some other dryland drills that may help you out. I have my kids do explosion jumping and running drills. The jumping drills we use the most come from basketball. Start in a squat position and explode up reaching with one hand like you are trying to touch a backboard or block a shot. Alternate the arm you reach with because the reach side leg will naturally do a little more work each time.

Another one is a quick jumping motion that will work your calfs and ankles and help with the "snap" at the end of your skating stride. Both arms overhead reaching up. Using just a slight knee bend, jump up and down over and over leaving from your toes and landing on the balls of your feet and going just until your heels barely touch the floor and then back up. Start with 5-10 reps and work up.

Last one will help with going to full speed while already in motion. If you have some space to run (preferably a football field) jog for 20 yards and then sprint for 20 yards back to jogging for 20 yards and sprint again for 20 yards the whole length of the field.

These are only designed to get your muscles used to the explosion moves. You will still need to work on the techniques on the ice. But having your quads and calfs in shape should bring about drastic improvements in the technique parts.

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04-26-2012, 03:31 PM
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Saucy Dangles
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Roller hockey destroy's Ice Hockey players skating mechanics (stride, technique, transitions, weight transfer). While they seem like they would be close from a technical stand point, they are the furthest from each other. Thats why I refuse to play roller now. I'd rather pay more to play the game I love, and grew up playing, as well as the game that is original and allows for far more agility and control then to sauce it up with a plastic puck and for the most part very non-contact type hockey. Not knocking roller hockey players, as I know plenty of them that are very very skilled individuals and have made excellent Ice hockey players, but most of them if you ask them (and i know a ton of professional roller players) most say they wished they would have started playing Ice first, as they love the speed (both skating and tempo of game) and control factor (stops and starts, tight turns, puck feel) it brings that Roller just cant match. I find that roller guys that transition to the game have the hardest time with stops and starts as well as the flow to the game and smaller/shorter passes (as well as 3 dimensional passing such as sauce passing or passing into an area) on top of tempo changes in a game. I do respect roller as it allows for people to get involved in the game of Hockey, and in the end thats all I ask for (more people playing).

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04-26-2012, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Saucy Dangles View Post
Roller hockey destroy's Ice Hockey players skating mechanics (stride, technique, transitions, weight transfer). While they seem like they would be close from a technical stand point, they are the furthest from each other. Thats why I refuse to play roller now. I'd rather pay more to play the game I love, and grew up playing, as well as the game that is original and allows for far more agility and control then to sauce it up with a plastic puck and for the most part very non-contact type hockey. Not knocking roller hockey players, as I know plenty of them that are very very skilled individuals and have made excellent Ice hockey players, but most of them if you ask them (and i know a ton of professional roller players) most say they wished they would have started playing Ice first, as they love the speed (both skating and tempo of game) and control factor (stops and starts, tight turns, puck feel) it brings that Roller just cant match. I find that roller guys that transition to the game have the hardest time with stops and starts as well as the flow to the game and smaller/shorter passes (as well as 3 dimensional passing such as sauce passing or passing into an area) on top of tempo changes in a game. I do respect roller as it allows for people to get involved in the game of Hockey, and in the end thats all I ask for (more people playing).
That's interesting, because I acutally felt worse after my last drop in on ice since the last stick and puck I went to (so, Tuesday vs. 2 weeks ago). I was a bit late, so I didn't ahve time to warm up and "get my ice legs back." It's annoying and really frustrating. At the stick and puck, it was so bad that I just fell right off the bat after getting on ice, but after 5 mintues or so I was fine. Given what you said here, it's pretty discouraging. Maybe I should just stick to running and such when I can't get on the ice then, eh? Do you think goalie at least translates fairly well? :p

And yeah, stopping is one of the hardest things for me to do because I get little practice at it.


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04-26-2012, 09:23 PM
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Originally Posted by CunniJA View Post
That's interesting, because I acutally felt worse after my last drop in on ice since the last stick and puck I went to (so, Tuesday vs. 2 weeks ago). I was a bit late, so I didn't ahve time to warm up and "get my ice legs back." It's annoying and really frustrating. At the stick and puck, it was so bad that I just fell right off the bat after getting on ice, but after 5 mintues or so I was fine. Given what you said here, it's pretty discouraging. Maybe I should just stick to running and such when I can't get on the ice then, eh? Do you think goalie at least translates fairly well? :p

And yeah, stopping is one of the hardest things for me to do because I get little practice at it.
It can be different for each person how quickly they transition from one to the other. I typically try to do some quick turns, stops, and quick starts during warm ups to remind my legs what to do. If you can do an ice activity somewhere between, that also helps.

I love hockey (and hate running) enough that it doesn't matter if I am a little shaky for a few minutes, I'd rather deal with swapping back and forth.

And I think goalie translates the worst, especially if you are talking about street hockey where there is almost no ability to slide side to side.

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04-26-2012, 10:42 PM
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Honestly, put your head down IF YOU DONT HAVE THE PUCK. For some reason you just seem to give more effort in your strides. Put your head down and plug away for a few strides then you should be good. Obviously it's a placebo effect but it makes you feel like you can go quicker than you normally would. Give it a shot, it's like mind over matter. You'll always feel like you have an extra gear when you do that.

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04-26-2012, 11:32 PM
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Honestly, put your head down IF YOU DONT HAVE THE PUCK. For some reason you just seem to give more effort in your strides. Put your head down and plug away for a few strides then you should be good. Obviously it's a placebo effect but it makes you feel like you can go quicker than you normally would. Give it a shot, it's like mind over matter. You'll always feel like you have an extra gear when you do that.
I don't really agree with this..odd time you can put your head down and hammer down backchecking etc but I would recommend keeping your head up as much as possible

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04-27-2012, 12:57 AM
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CunniJA
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It can be different for each person how quickly they transition from one to the other. I typically try to do some quick turns, stops, and quick starts during warm ups to remind my legs what to do. If you can do an ice activity somewhere between, that also helps.

I love hockey (and hate running) enough that it doesn't matter if I am a little shaky for a few minutes, I'd rather deal with swapping back and forth.

And I think goalie translates the worst, especially if you are talking about street hockey where there is almost no ability to slide side to side.
Yeah. Can't push off of all that much.

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04-27-2012, 06:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawn1331 View Post
Honestly, put your head down IF YOU DONT HAVE THE PUCK. For some reason you just seem to give more effort in your strides. Put your head down and plug away for a few strides then you should be good. Obviously it's a placebo effect but it makes you feel like you can go quicker than you normally would. Give it a shot, it's like mind over matter. You'll always feel like you have an extra gear when you do that.
Or keep your head up so you can locate the puck and skate to an area where you can intercept the opposing player or catch a pass?

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04-27-2012, 08:07 AM
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power is one thing but quick feets another

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