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How to improve hockey sense?

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Old
05-03-2012, 09:55 AM
  #51
Happy Fan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gino 14 View Post
About the only advice worth listening to in the thread. If you don't have some skills you'll never develope hockey sense. If you can't get your head up while handling the puck you'll never be able to see the ice and never will get a feel for what's going on. Anyone that believes you get hockey sense from watching others play is
ACTUALLY it was watching hockey on tv all the time that got me to realize I needed to stickhandle with my head up. It took a while for me to get to the point where i noticed the massive difference was my choppy stickhandling and constantly keeping my head down. So over a few summers of playing in the basement, I can do a lot more things and creative tricks.

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05-03-2012, 10:12 AM
  #52
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Originally Posted by hockeymass View Post
That's not "hockey sense". That's athletic ability.
Hockey sense is a mental thing, and in order to process what's going to happen, where people will be, and a multitude of other factors, you use specific mental abilities. Working memory, spacial awareness, so on. Whether your brain is strong in those areas or not depends on genetics. If you drew the short end of the stick on those, you might still be able to learn hockey sense, but you'll never advance as far as the guy who's gifted with those traits.

It's the same principle as overall intelligence. Even though pure IQ is just about worthless, we're gonna simplify. The guy with the 130 IQ and the guy with a 70 IQ were born with the same amount of knowledge, but the guy with the 130 IQ is going to learn much more easily and he's going to learn more. Genetics ain't fair in that way, though some recent research suggests that you may be able to improve working memory some.

Absolutely hockey sense has to be taught. But some people's minds are better configured for it than others.

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05-03-2012, 10:49 AM
  #53
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Originally Posted by AmazedRink View Post
ACTUALLY it was watching hockey on tv all the time that got me to realize I needed to stickhandle with my head up. It took a while for me to get to the point where i noticed the massive difference was my choppy stickhandling and constantly keeping my head down. So over a few summers of playing in the basement, I can do a lot more things and creative tricks.


That isn't hockey sense. It's Common sense.

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05-03-2012, 11:38 AM
  #54
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Originally Posted by Dump and Chase View Post
That isn't hockey sense. It's Common sense.
I started playing at 13, it gets to be a bit of a struggle starting out, even in house league. 2 full summers of street blading and stickhandling non-stop really brought out some some skills for me. It's just constant repetition to the point where your body's twitching dream moves in your sleep lol.

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05-03-2012, 11:48 AM
  #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Hockey sense is a mental thing, and in order to process what's going to happen, where people will be, and a multitude of other factors, you use specific mental abilities. Working memory, spacial awareness, so on. Whether your brain is strong in those areas or not depends on genetics. If you drew the short end of the stick on those, you might still be able to learn hockey sense, but you'll never advance as far as the guy who's gifted with those traits.

It's the same principle as overall intelligence. Even though pure IQ is just about worthless, we're gonna simplify. The guy with the 130 IQ and the guy with a 70 IQ were born with the same amount of knowledge, but the guy with the 130 IQ is going to learn much more easily and he's going to learn more. Genetics ain't fair in that way, though some recent research suggests that you may be able to improve working memory some.

Absolutely hockey sense has to be taught. But some people's minds are better configured for it than others.
Again, it's a semantics argument. Yes you use specific mental abilities that are genetically endowed. But "Hockey Sense" is a made up term for somebody that can play a made up game.

It's like how some people are more right or left brained inclined. This lets them grasp mathematical or artistic concepts easier, but they still have to learn those concepts. Einstein was not born with the innate ability to do calculus and neither was Gretzky born with the ability to read and make plays on a sheet of ice.

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05-03-2012, 12:16 PM
  #56
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Originally Posted by nightfighter View Post
Again, it's a semantics argument. Yes you use specific mental abilities that are genetically endowed. But "Hockey Sense" is a made up term for somebody that can play a made up game.

It's like how some people are more right or left brained inclined. This lets them grasp mathematical or artistic concepts easier, but they still have to learn those concepts. Einstein was not born with the innate ability to do calculus and neither was Gretzky born with the ability to read and make plays on a sheet of ice.
This is my whole point. We are born with a certain set of tools, yes? These tools are different from person to person, yes?

Now some of those tools lend themselves to the bundle of skills we call "hockey sense" and some do not. They also probably lend themselves to "basketball sense" or "football sense" or maybe even generally "game sense".

Hockey sense - that is, the bundle of skills that we call hockey sense - is developed. But if people lack those genetically predetermined tools, how can they ever reach the same levels of "hockey sense" as others?

Some people are born with an innate sense of colour, form and space. They may develop into much better than average painters or sculptors if they practice that bundle of skills. They may never pick up a paintbrush or lump of clay, but the tools were there from birth.

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05-03-2012, 01:54 PM
  #57
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Do you need to be in the top 1 percentile in genetically ingrained pattern recognition skills to play in the NHL? I suggest the answer to this would be No!

Do you need to be "elite" in a genetic pre-disposition for spatial recognition to play in the NHL? NO!



We can all agree that having these predispositions will make it easier for an individual to exhibit good "hockey sense". Hopefully we can also agree that these skills can be learned by the average individual as well. Hell...let me prove it!!



NHL hockey players on average are very much defined by their month of birth. IF you don't believe me, go read Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. Since it is a proven fact that most NHL'ers are born in the first quarter of the year we can easily rule genetic predispositions out of the equation. Unless...you can provide proof that people who carry dominant genes in pattern recognition and spatial relation do most of their conceiving in the months of May, June and July


Can pretty much anyone learn to have better hockey sense? Yes!

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05-03-2012, 02:40 PM
  #58
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Originally Posted by Dump and Chase View Post
Do you need to be in the top 1 percentile in genetically ingrained pattern recognition skills to play in the NHL? I suggest the answer to this would be No!

Do you need to be "elite" in a genetic pre-disposition for spatial recognition to play in the NHL? NO!

We can all agree that having these predispositions will make it easier for an individual to exhibit good "hockey sense". Hopefully we can also agree that these skills can be learned by the average individual as well. Hell...let me prove it!!

NHL hockey players on average are very much defined by their month of birth. IF you don't believe me, go read Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. Since it is a proven fact that most NHL'ers are born in the first quarter of the year we can easily rule genetic predispositions out of the equation. Unless...you can provide proof that people who carry dominant genes in pattern recognition and spatial relation do most of their conceiving in the months of May, June and July

Can pretty much anyone learn to have better hockey sense? Yes!
Gladwell also notes that the reason kids born on those months develop into NHLers is that for most of their lives, they have a six-to twelve-month developmental advantage over people born much later in the year. The difference can be huge and is often decisive. Slightly older participants are more likely to be selected for travel teams, for example, because they tend to be more mature physically and psychologically. There is a huge difference between someone just shy of their 7th birthday and someone who has just turned 6 - even though they are both technically 6 y ears old.

Its January for hockey, May for baseball, and August for soccer.

This is a much different argument than the general principle that people with the right tools have an easier time developing what we call "hockey sense".

Can we all improve our hockey sense? Sure. Will a kid with average mental tools ever have better hockey sense than a kid with extraordinary mental tools? Very doubtful.

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05-03-2012, 04:12 PM
  #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dump and Chase View Post
Do you need to be in the top 1 percentile in genetically ingrained pattern recognition skills to play in the NHL? I suggest the answer to this would be No!

Do you need to be "elite" in a genetic pre-disposition for spatial recognition to play in the NHL? NO!



We can all agree that having these predispositions will make it easier for an individual to exhibit good "hockey sense". Hopefully we can also agree that these skills can be learned by the average individual as well. Hell...let me prove it!!



NHL hockey players on average are very much defined by their month of birth. IF you don't believe me, go read Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. Since it is a proven fact that most NHL'ers are born in the first quarter of the year we can easily rule genetic predispositions out of the equation. Unless...you can provide proof that people who carry dominant genes in pattern recognition and spatial relation do most of their conceiving in the months of May, June and July


Can pretty much anyone learn to have better hockey sense? Yes!
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Old
05-03-2012, 05:42 PM
  #60
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For the OP,

- work on your individual skills to gain confidence to make plays

- play against faster and stronger competition to get used to that pace, then when you get back to your level it will seem slowed down and easy

- watch a lot of hockey and break down successful breakouts, goals, and defenses whenever possible (rewind, slow mo, watch who is going where, etc)

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01-13-2013, 08:09 PM
  #61
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What I find helpful too is the ISO cam or star cam during certain games.

That allows you to understand how a complete shift of one player is like.

I'd add that keeping your head up at all time, look for your space and teammates, and never forget that your objective is to go and score that goal.

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Old
01-14-2013, 10:30 AM
  #62
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OP, conversation is getting pretty 'deep' here.

Sense/skill can be developed together. Don't let others get you down, NHL players spent 1000's and 1000's of hours developing their skills (ask Sidney Crosby's mom about being a goalie or ask the their washing machine in the bsmt.), they WERE NOT born as NHL allstars...

The most effective thing you can work on yourself is puck/ball handling. Get a "stickhandling ball", golf ball, practice puck, etc. etc. & use them off the ice, @ home/parking lot/basement, where ever. Put the time in, after a 100 hours, of practice, you're going to improve drastically. Remember to consciously train yourself to keep your head up & look around while you're practising.

Learn about different puck cycling strategies, offensive zone strategies, break-out plays etc.

Next, get on the ice & keep your head up (practice keeping your head on a swivel & look around the ice even when you don't have the puck). Another good point is when you don't have the puck, be a good passing option for your teammates.

All of your new skills will translate to your game, play against players 'slightly' higher than your skill level if you can. Use your teammates, try to make plays & have fun!

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