HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > NHL Eastern Conference > Atlantic Division > Toronto Maple Leafs
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

Lessons for Leafs from Kings Stanley Cup Win

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
06-15-2012, 03:43 AM
  #126
ITM
Make Mine Marner
 
ITM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,128
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyeball11 View Post
Indeed. What was it people said when Burke landed Niedermayer and Pronger? Bet they won't say the same about Lombardi.
I bet they won't either.

ITM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-15-2012, 01:18 PM
  #127
Vinh
Registered User
 
Vinh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 136
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgeworth View Post
This has been probably beaten to death but:

They won becuase Quick carried their ***** all season and into the postseason, he didnt start having bad games until the SCF. LA couldn't score to save their life. Toronto probably will never get that kind of goaltending, its once in a blue moon.
Disagree. Quick was easily their MVP in the regular season (should be a Hart candidate), but numbers aside, he had a few poor outings in the playoffs: Game 3 against St. Louis, Game 1, 3, and 4 against Phoenix, Game 5 against Jersey come to mind immediately.

Sutter's system being carried out perfectly is the #1 reason the Kings won the Cup. Aggressive forecheck, phenomenal penalty kill, physicality, sound collective defense, and the most versatile center depth in the league. The players bought into the game plan to the fullest extent and were rewarded for it. Also helps to have a game-changer called Drew Doughty on the ice for 26 minutes a night.

For all of the praise thrown his way, the team in front of Quick was even better. Without question the most impressive TEAM performance of the post-lockout era.

As for L.A. not being able to score, I mean, that's just factually incorrect. After the Carter deal, they were the best offense (and team) in the league and they ended up with the third-best offense in the playoffs behind the ridiculous firewagon hockey of the Philly-Pittsburgh series. If that abomination of a matchup doesn't happen (worst hockey I've seen in years), the Kings have the #1 postseason offense in the world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgeworth View Post
It was Jeff Carter...pretty easily.
Like really easily, it was Jeff Carter. He did jack **** in playoffs.
3 game-winners (tied for tops in the entire playoffs), including the cup-clinching marker. Though Carter was hardly dominant, he provided timely goal-scoring and was a threat with his skating and shooting ability. Hell, his mere presence on the Kings roster gave the Kopitar unit more space on the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by puckyeah View Post
One of the "unsung" heroes of the Kings was Mike Richards and what he brought to the 'room'. He brought a 'killer instinct' to this team. The Kings, while they were very good over the last few years and getting better, they never had that 'edge' that would permit them to advance thru tough physical rounds of the playoffs. Richards brought that 'win or die' attitude to the room and i think his leadership was immense.

I think teams need a player who is willing to leave it all on the ice and sacrifice life and limb and a player who's really respected in the room and the other guys will follow.
It's a shame folks rely on stats to belittle Richards' contributions (15 points in 20 games is nothing to scoff at either). He was such a steadying presence in all three zones -- I'm not sure there's a forward out there who supports his teammates positionally as well and as consistently as Richards does -- and really provided a spark on special teams. When the games start to matter, you want him on your side because, to paraphrase Peter Deboer, he'll run you over with a car to win. Beauty of a player.

It's no happy coincidence that he's always trusted to be on the ice with the game on the line -- whether it's preserving a one-goal lead or trying to tie it up. It's also no coincidence that winning follows him everywhere he goes. Stanley Cup champion, Olympic Gold, World Junior Gold, Calder Cup, Memorial Cup. I mean, the resume speaks for itself.

If I've learned anything from this Kings run, it's this: If Mike Richards is on the trade market, you do what you must to acquire him. A born leader and winner through and through.

Vinh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-15-2012, 05:06 PM
  #128
dirk41
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,411
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinh View Post
he had a few poor outings in the playoffs: Game 3 against St. Louis, Game 1, 3, and 4 against Phoenix, Game 5 against Jersey come to mind immediately.
In the five games you listed, Quick gave up a total of NINE goals. Yeah, he gave up a few bad goals, but no goalie is perfect.

Come on. You're even listing a game in which he gave up one goal. OMG poor outing.

dirk41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-16-2012, 08:16 AM
  #129
Doug Gilmour
Leafer Since '95
 
Doug Gilmour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kingsville, ON
Country: Mexico
Posts: 1,116
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mess View Post
The real lesson to be learned from the Kings winning this year and the Bruins last season is ..

"Defense Wins Championships"

LA gave up 6 goals in 6 games in the Stanley Cup finals.

Size, heart, grit, strength up the middle, strong defense and outstanding goaltending.. Timely well executed trades Richards, Carter, to go along with their draft developed core players Quick, Doughty, Kopitar, Brown spearheaded the Kings to victory.

They're a good model to follow to build a winning team.
Plus they are under the cap for next season IIRC, so a repeat could in the future.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaiinleaf View Post
The big physical players won the series for kings Lewis was amazing like Brown

We have good D need a goalie yes!!!

But our team is way to perimeter built....that's not a playoff team ...
Playoff hockey is a war not ice capades
Lewis was probably the unsung hero of the playoffs.

Doug Gilmour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-16-2012, 09:49 AM
  #130
hockeyfanz*
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 7,913
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinh View Post
Disagree. Quick was easily their MVP in the regular season (should be a Hart candidate), but numbers aside, he had a few poor outings in the playoffs: Game 3 against St. Louis, Game 1, 3, and 4 against Phoenix, Game 5 against Jersey come to mind immediately.

Sutter's system being carried out perfectly is the #1 reason the Kings won the Cup. Aggressive forecheck, phenomenal penalty kill, physicality, sound collective defense, and the most versatile center depth in the league. The players bought into the game plan to the fullest extent and were rewarded for it. Also helps to have a game-changer called Drew Doughty on the ice for 26 minutes a night.

For all of the praise thrown his way, the team in front of Quick was even better. Without question the most impressive TEAM performance of the post-lockout era.

As for L.A. not being able to score, I mean, that's just factually incorrect. After the Carter deal, they were the best offense (and team) in the league and they ended up with the third-best offense in the playoffs behind the ridiculous firewagon hockey of the Philly-Pittsburgh series. If that abomination of a matchup doesn't happen (worst hockey I've seen in years), the Kings have the #1 postseason offense in the world.

3 game-winners (tied for tops in the entire playoffs), including the cup-clinching marker. Though Carter was hardly dominant, he provided timely goal-scoring and was a threat with his skating and shooting ability. Hell, his mere presence on the Kings roster gave the Kopitar unit more space on the ice.

It's a shame folks rely on stats to belittle Richards' contributions (15 points in 20 games is nothing to scoff at either). He was such a steadying presence in all three zones -- I'm not sure there's a forward out there who supports his teammates positionally as well and as consistently as Richards does -- and really provided a spark on special teams. When the games start to matter, you want him on your side because, to paraphrase Peter Deboer, he'll run you over with a car to win. Beauty of a player.

It's no happy coincidence that he's always trusted to be on the ice with the game on the line -- whether it's preserving a one-goal lead or trying to tie it up. It's also no coincidence that winning follows him everywhere he goes. Stanley Cup champion, Olympic Gold, World Junior Gold, Calder Cup, Memorial Cup. I mean, the resume speaks for itself.

If I've learned anything from this Kings run, it's this: If Mike Richards is on the trade market, you do what you must to acquire him. A born leader and winner through and through.
Awesome post and good synopsis of the powerful Kings team. I watched them through the entire playoffs and they were dominant. Physically they damaged the other teams. That is the biggest similarity between the Kings and last years Bruins. Both teams could and would punish their opponents as well as be able to score, defend and goaltend. Those who think it is all goaltending haven't a clue. If you watched the Kings play you would know they are a complete team. It is pretty rare that a team wins the Stanley Cup on goaltending alone. The Habs tried it a few years back with Halak who was heroic. They went as far as getting smoked in the ECF.

Who can remember the last time a team "stole" the Cup on the backs of their goaltender? The Cup winner most often has outstanding goaltending. Also the Goalie often is the winner of the Conn Smythe trophy (5 out of the last 11 including one losing goalie, JSG)

Probably Patrick Roy of that notorious 1993 season is the last time a goalie "stole" the Cup. That is, the Habs were not a strong dominating team and had 10 OT wins to victory that year. That is remarkable and also highly unlikely.

The Kings like the Bruins last season were an all around great hockey team with outstanding goaltending. That is truth.

hockeyfanz* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-16-2012, 11:35 PM
  #131
AvroArrow
Registered User
 
AvroArrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Toronto
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,489
vCash: 500
Kings have the best goalie currently in the nhl
Strongest top 6 easily, kopitar,brown,williams,carter,richards,penner
Drew doughty played close to perfect
strong bottom 6 who does their job pretty well,wearing other players down
the WHOLE team plays defense, not just the D men
Have an experienced coach who knows success

AvroArrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-17-2012, 07:53 AM
  #132
KuleminFan41
Registered User
 
KuleminFan41's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Country: Portugal
Posts: 4,878
vCash: 500
Quick drafted 72nd

Drew Doughty 2nd
Alec Martinez 95th
Slava Voynov 32nd
Rob Scuderi UFA
Willie Mitchell UFA
Matt Greene trade

Kopitar 11th
Brown 13th
Clifford 35th
Lewis 17th
Nolan 186th
Richardson trade
Williams trade
Stoll trade
Penner trade
Gagne UFA
Carter trade
Richards trade

Now will people stop saying you need top 5 picks all the time to win the cup?Not every player needs to be drafted and not every player is a first rounder. First rounders aren't the holy grail

KuleminFan41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-17-2012, 10:17 AM
  #133
Thrice
Coyote Killer
 
Thrice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,968
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinh View Post
Disagree. Quick was easily their MVP in the regular season (should be a Hart candidate), but numbers aside, he had a few poor outings in the playoffs: Game 3 against St. Louis, Game 1, 3, and 4 against Phoenix, Game 5 against Jersey come to mind immediately.

Sutter's system being carried out perfectly is the #1 reason the Kings won the Cup. Aggressive forecheck, phenomenal penalty kill, physicality, sound collective defense, and the most versatile center depth in the league. The players bought into the game plan to the fullest extent and were rewarded for it. Also helps to have a game-changer called Drew Doughty on the ice for 26 minutes a night.

For all of the praise thrown his way, the team in front of Quick was even better. Without question the most impressive TEAM performance of the post-lockout era.

As for L.A. not being able to score, I mean, that's just factually incorrect. After the Carter deal, they were the best offense (and team) in the league and they ended up with the third-best offense in the playoffs behind the ridiculous firewagon hockey of the Philly-Pittsburgh series. If that abomination of a matchup doesn't happen (worst hockey I've seen in years), the Kings have the #1 postseason offense in the world.

3 game-winners (tied for tops in the entire playoffs), including the cup-clinching marker. Though Carter was hardly dominant, he provided timely goal-scoring and was a threat with his skating and shooting ability. Hell, his mere presence on the Kings roster gave the Kopitar unit more space on the ice.

It's a shame folks rely on stats to belittle Richards' contributions (15 points in 20 games is nothing to scoff at either). He was such a steadying presence in all three zones -- I'm not sure there's a forward out there who supports his teammates positionally as well and as consistently as Richards does -- and really provided a spark on special teams. When the games start to matter, you want him on your side because, to paraphrase Peter Deboer, he'll run you over with a car to win. Beauty of a player.

It's no happy coincidence that he's always trusted to be on the ice with the game on the line -- whether it's preserving a one-goal lead or trying to tie it up. It's also no coincidence that winning follows him everywhere he goes. Stanley Cup champion, Olympic Gold, World Junior Gold, Calder Cup, Memorial Cup. I mean, the resume speaks for itself.

If I've learned anything from this Kings run, it's this: If Mike Richards is on the trade market, you do what you must to acquire him. A born leader and winner through and through.
As a Kings fan, I agree with this post 100%.

Quick was not perfect in these Playoffs. He was phenomenal against Vancouver. He was a brick wall in Game 1 of the St. Louis series, which visibly crushed their will to score, as they came out like a gangbusters in that initial 10 minutes of period 1. Quick stopped everything they threw at him and you could see a physical change in their forwards when they couldn't get anything by him. I've never seen a goalie get in a team's head like that before. But after that, Quick didn't have to be the best player on the team. The system took over. In fact, I'd say Drew Doughty was the Kings best player from Game 1 through Game 20.

About Mike Richards, the guy is amazing. I don't know how he does, what he does. He's small, not very fast, has an inaccurate shot, makes too many passes in the offensive zone but I wouldn't trade him for any other Center in the Western Conference. His physicality in game 1 vs. Vancouver set the tone for the entire playoff run. He battles Kesler all game long. He scores a huge goal and he runs over Burrows. All of this took place in Vancouver's own building. Richards is a special player and while his stats don't put him up with the big boys, there aren't many other players I'd rather have on my team with a Cup on the line.

So the moral of this story is, don't try to copy the Kings model, models don't matter. It boils down to depth throughout the roster and your team's best players playing their best hockey when it matters most.

Thrice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-19-2012, 01:24 PM
  #134
Vinh
Registered User
 
Vinh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 136
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirk41 View Post
In the five games you listed, Quick gave up a total of NINE goals. Yeah, he gave up a few bad goals, but no goalie is perfect.

Come on. You're even listing a game in which he gave up one goal. OMG poor outing.
GAA is not strictly a reflection of a goaltender's performance (Quick's best showing might actually have been Game 5 against Phoenix, when he allowed 3 goals -- two bogus tips and a rebound -- that basically no one would stop and made a number of incredible saves that kept the Kings in it) and the team should be given its due for such sterling stats. Best defensive performance I've seen in ages. This was no passive, shot-block-oriented scheme, they hounded the puck as a 5-man unit and completely smothered whoever they were facing.

Quick's a great tender (maybe the best in the league), but there is no question he was shaky after the Vancouver series. He did NOT carry his team to a Stanley Cup. The team carried itself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrice View Post
In fact, I'd say Drew Doughty was the Kings best player from Game 1 through Game 20.

About Mike Richards, the guy is amazing. I don't know how he does, what he does. He's small, not very fast, has an inaccurate shot, makes too many passes in the offensive zone but I wouldn't trade him for any other Center in the Western Conference. His physicality in game 1 vs. Vancouver set the tone for the entire playoff run. He battles Kesler all game long. He scores a huge goal and he runs over Burrows. All of this took place in Vancouver's own building. Richards is a special player and while his stats don't put him up with the big boys, there aren't many other players I'd rather have on my team with a Cup on the line.
I'm with you on Doughty as the most consistent and important piece throughout the playoff run. 16 points in 20 games with a +11 rating up against the top opposing forwards every night. He was basically out there for half of L.A.'s postseason and there was no player who made more of an impact in all three zones. In addition to the shutdown defense, the kid's a one-man breakout who can break a game open with a single rush (see: Game 5 against Vancouver, Game 2 against New Jersey).

Richards is all about hockey IQ and compete level. He just knows where to be and what to do in most situations and his will overtakes any shortage of natural skill. He makes so many small plays that go unnoticed -- it's little things spilling into big things. Just look at Game 6 against the Devils: Brown gets all the credit for the 2-0 goal, but it's Richards who goes into the corner, wins the puck, and feeds him in a high-percentage area. For my money, the best forward in the Cup Finals. The guy plays to win and I became a Kings fan the day L.A. acquired him.

Vinh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:34 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2015 All Rights Reserved.