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The flip clear

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11-09-2011, 12:02 AM
  #1
Islander102
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The flip clear

Looking for some help guys. I have played forward all my life, and am now playing D on my men's league team because they are absolutely abysmal, and I am one of 2 guys that can backskate, skate with the puck, and make an outlet pass without panicking and slamming the puck along the boards or icing it.

One play that I never received any formal instruction on, but can be so vital is the flip clear. YOu have all seen it in NHL games, players are under pressure and they lift the puck at a fairly slow speed 20+ feet in the air over everyone's head and out of the zone. It works wonders on the PK because nobody can hold the puck in at the blueline, and it has a ton of hangtime, eating seconds off the clock. At even strength it works great too, because the puck usually dies when it comes back down to the ice, because it is flipping and has no momentum, so if youre pinned in your own zone, you can dump the puck out without taking an icing, or having to skate it to the redline.

Well, IMO this is such an underrated and beneficial play, yet I have no idea how to do it, nobody I play with or against uses it, and because its such a non descript play, there are no instructional videos on youtube for it. My abysmal team is pinned in their zone quite a bit, is shorthanded quite a bit, and I feel that me being able to flip the puck out instead of having to line up a slapshot out of the zone that takes longer, and has a chance of being picked off out of the air anyway would greatly benefit us, and would benefit my game as a D. Anyone that uses this play a lot, I would appreciate walking me through how its done. I want to get the puck up as high as I can, while being able to send it as far down the ice as possible, and without much time to set it up. Velocity is not important, and neither is puck spin, as the aim is a wobbly puck that will die out when it lands.

Help is really appreciated guys!

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11-09-2011, 12:26 AM
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vapor11
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It is very easy to do.. all you do is use the end of your blade to scoop it up..lay the blade sorta flat on the back of the blade in the process.. practice it a few times..only beginner skill required

EDIT: beginner skill required to do it but to get it to go where you want..that is going to take some practice

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11-09-2011, 08:31 AM
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ChiTownHawks
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It is hard to describe the shot as it is more of a feel/finesse kind of thing. Just start playing around one day and you'll get it, especially if you are a pretty experienced player.

Make sure you practice like Kessel said though b/c I have done this successfully a bunch of times and have failed at it a bunch of times during a game, and when you fail you end up with this limp shot that goes three feet in the air and dies before your blueline.

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11-09-2011, 09:07 AM
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Jarick
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It's easiest to do if you pull the puck in first, then scoop with your wrists. I like to practice by lining up pucks near the goal line and roofing them, same thing. Using the toe of the blade is good advice too. The only downside is hitting the rafters of the rink when you're trying a flip pass. Although it's awesome when you successfully flip it past their D and your forward beats them to the puck for a breakaway!

Also once you get good at it, work on the backhand. I can't do it very well but I've played with guys who can chip it way up and out easily on the backhand and it's invaluable under pressure.

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11-09-2011, 10:51 AM
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Islander102
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Thanks a lot guys. I definitely have the skills to do it, I've been playing for 10+ years, I'll give it some practices at stick time tomorrow and Friday, and hopefully have some semblance of how to do it by Sunday.

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11-09-2011, 12:44 PM
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hyster110
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best thing is to go out and just practice with your stick and get the feel for it, bot forehand and backhand because both can come in handy

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11-09-2011, 03:19 PM
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berzark
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Don't need to pull the puck in. The key is lowering your bottom hand and making sure you're holding it tight. When starting the motion to scoop it in the air you need to have your blade in a neutral stance (not cupping the puck and not open), and go from that position to an open blade right before you start lifting your stick\the puck.

Practice this in warm-ups or outside with a skill-pad. I've mastered it in fairly short time. Just started practicing it 1 week ago and I can throw it on top of the net 4 times out of 10 from the top of the circles =P

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11-10-2011, 01:09 AM
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Islander102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berzark View Post
Don't need to pull the puck in. The key is lowering your bottom hand and making sure you're holding it tight. When starting the motion to scoop it in the air you need to have your blade in a neutral stance (not cupping the puck and not open), and go from that position to an open blade right before you start lifting your stick\the puck.

Practice this in warm-ups or outside with a skill-pad. I've mastered it in fairly short time. Just started practicing it 1 week ago and I can throw it on top of the net 4 times out of 10 from the top of the circles =P
Thanks. I was doing this outside with a skill pad today and got the action pretty quickly. Before long I was able to flip the puck off my basketball backboard which is above my hockey net, with regularity. I am going to practice in warm up on the ice tomorrow, because I suspect it will be a bit more challenging when you dont have the traction of standing up on ground. All and all its a pretty simple motion that shouldnt take much time to master, but I never got around to learning it.

It can be such a big help on defense in a time sensitive situation and I cant wait to use it in a game.

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11-10-2011, 08:58 AM
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Jarick
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Yes the difference between the friction of outdoor and ice is huge when it comes to this stuff but the muscle memory is similar.

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11-11-2011, 09:38 AM
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mbowman
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I found the curve of my stick really helped. I used a lidstrom curve for years, which has a bit of a toe flare, which made it really easy to just use the toe of the blade to get up and under the puck to dump it high. a little trickier on the backhand though

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11-11-2011, 12:49 PM
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This was oddly enough a set play for one of my teams. I played defense majority of my playing years. When a puck was dumped in, I would get it, or receive a pass from the other D. One of our speedier forwards would immediately take off up center ice. I'd flip it as high and far as I could to the forward who would hopefully be behind the opposing D. It worked I'd say 60% of the time. It led to a few breakaway goals or at the very least set us up in the other zone. Underrated yet effective part of hockey.

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11-11-2011, 01:19 PM
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IslesZoso
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From what you describe, it sounds like you play for my Midnight Hockey team.

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11-11-2011, 01:47 PM
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remember that it is the bottom hand controls whether the puck goes in the air or stays on the ice. this is true on shots and passes, and of course clears. the top hand may open the blade and helps with the propulsion of the puck, but the bottom hand is actually transfering most of the energy to the stick and the puck and also doing the lifting off the ice.

in short, your wrists and hands should scoop the puck, but right after the bottom hand has to throw it into the air.

to see this in action, try do send the puck into the air using only the top hand. you can't. the stick is too long and too heavy. even if you somehow attach the stick in the middle through a fulcrum (like a bottom hand) you'll still struggle to send it more than a few inches off the ice with just the top hand, no matter how much open the blade or how hard you pull.

now grab the stick with just your bottom hand and try to flip the puck up into the air. you'll find that you can practice this rather quickly by scooping and throwing the puck. the stick is still long and uncomfortable, but feels much lighter. your hand is that much closer to the blade, which gives you more control. and the range of motion of your bottom hand is greater than your top hand. in fact the only thing your top hand is better at is dexterity, since most commonly it's your dominant hand.

good luck.

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06-19-2012, 02:01 PM
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uncleodb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berzark View Post
Don't need to pull the puck in. The key is lowering your bottom hand and making sure you're holding it tight. When starting the motion to scoop it in the air you need to have your blade in a neutral stance (not cupping the puck and not open), and go from that position to an open blade right before you start lifting your stick\the puck.

Practice this in warm-ups or outside with a skill-pad. I've mastered it in fairly short time. Just started practicing it 1 week ago and I can throw it on top of the net 4 times out of 10 from the top of the circles =P
I've been trying this, but can't seem to get the motion down. Are you moving your hands quickly for the scoop? I find that I'm losing traction, and all I get is either the puck sliding away from me, or a semi-wrister. Is this a really fast motion? Or is it a slower motion where you feel like your cradling the puck? Sorry, I'm not explaining this right. So far, I've lowered my bottom hand, tightened my grip and trying this from a neutral stance. I did try this before with just my blade fully flat (open) and coming in on the puck to try to lift it, but can't seem to do that with any success as well.

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06-19-2012, 02:41 PM
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Jarick
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It's got to be the hardest thing to describe how to do...

You want the puck "stuck" to the blade, like you were scooping it. Seems easier on the curved part (mid/toe) rather than the flat part (like the heel). I usually "chip" at it as well, digging into the ice and then rotating the wrists.

Pretend like you're starting a car. See how the wrist rotates with the forearm muscle? That's the kind of motion I'm talking about with the wrists. Put the blade up against the puck and do that motion to "scoop" it up in the air.

Hit a guy with one of these again Sunday. Flipped from the D zone past everyone and right in front of him as he was streaking out all alone. Then he missed on the deke so no point for me.

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06-19-2012, 05:51 PM
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Like this? You shovel the puck up. The puck is on the end of the blade and you keep the blade open so the heel and toe stay even and to the front.

A saucer pass is sort of similar but the puck is on the heel or middle of the blade then you push it heel first and put a spin on the puck. Generally this pass is much lower to the ice and is designed to get it over stick blades.

It takes practice to get it right.





Last edited by Wooty: 06-19-2012 at 05:57 PM.
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06-19-2012, 06:06 PM
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nullterm
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Jarick does a great job on the small details. I'm not sure how to describe the subtle points.

Feels more like you are trying to sweep the puck, rather than shoot it. So the puck wants to stay on the blade of your stick as long as possible, start slowly pushing the puck and smooth accelerate through the full motion.

I'm guessing a bit not having a stick & puck to try and evaluate how I do it. I think you want to have the puck low on your blade and have it roll up towards the toe as you swing. If the puck is rolling against the blade from heel to toe, then when your stick comes up off the ice then the puck comes up too.

Roll your wrists, so the blade toe comes up, as you do it when your stick for more lift/loft.

Like a lazy wrist shot, trying to give it air, instead of speed.

If the puck is up on it's edge/side, you can also just put blade on one side of it and sweep it up. Doesn't happen often, but when it does makes it easy to launch.

Personally, I just prefer the ole snap shot bounce off the boards and out. Banking it at an angle off the boards eats up alot of the puck's speed and slows it down.

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06-20-2012, 08:52 AM
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Jarick
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Another thing to get the motion, start with a ball, any ball (tennis ball, etc), and work on scooping it up. It's not a perfect translation, but it's a start. You want to be able to scoop the ball up off the ground without shoveling underneath it. Then try with a puck.

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06-21-2012, 04:22 PM
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uncleodb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
It's got to be the hardest thing to describe how to do...

You want the puck "stuck" to the blade, like you were scooping it. Seems easier on the curved part (mid/toe) rather than the flat part (like the heel). I usually "chip" at it as well, digging into the ice and then rotating the wrists.

Pretend like you're starting a car. See how the wrist rotates with the forearm muscle? That's the kind of motion I'm talking about with the wrists. Put the blade up against the puck and do that motion to "scoop" it up in the air.

Hit a guy with one of these again Sunday. Flipped from the D zone past everyone and right in front of him as he was streaking out all alone. Then he missed on the deke so no point for me.
Wow, that's a pretty detailed explanation. I'll keep practicing it and give your technique a try. I'm assuming your motion is quick when you say that you "chip"/"dig" into the ice? That means your wrist rotation is pretty fast too? I was trying it like dragging the puck along as if I was going to do a wrister, but then rotate my wrist to try to lift the puck up in the air. Yeah, definitely hard to explain and do. Thanks for the tips.

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06-21-2012, 06:21 PM
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Skip to 2:25ish


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06-22-2012, 09:49 AM
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Jarick
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That's kind of what I do but without the toe drag. The toe drag helps the puck "stick" to the blade so you can get the height on it, but it takes an extra step and obviously if you're trying to clear the puck out of the D zone you don't want to screw up a toe drag. Notice he still uses a bit of wrist action to sail the puck up. It's just a lot of practice to get it all down.

Now the most impressive was a former teammate who was just ridiculous with the flip pass. He could do it on the backhand every time.

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06-22-2012, 11:25 AM
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Wilch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
That's kind of what I do but without the toe drag. The toe drag helps the puck "stick" to the blade so you can get the height on it, but it takes an extra step and obviously if you're trying to clear the puck out of the D zone you don't want to screw up a toe drag. Notice he still uses a bit of wrist action to sail the puck up. It's just a lot of practice to get it all down.

Now the most impressive was a former teammate who was just ridiculous with the flip pass. He could do it on the backhand every time.
It's a lot easier if you do it with a neutral curve. I used to use Sakic and found it slightly tougher to pull off. Right now I'm using Zetterberg/Cammy curve and I can really get a lot of height on my back hand passes/shots.

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06-22-2012, 11:37 AM
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Jarick
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I found the opposite. I learned it with neutral mid curves like the Reebok Bergeron and Bauer P88 but when I went to P92 I started hitting the rafters on the flip clear.

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06-22-2012, 11:49 AM
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Wilch
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Guess it all comes down to preferences.

Then again I never tried any aggressive curves before. Should do that one day.

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06-22-2012, 11:52 AM
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Jarick
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It's worth trying. You'll need to use different shot mechanics but for me everything improved.

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