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Skating with the puck or tendency to pass first

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Old
06-26-2012, 06:01 PM
  #1
rayau
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Skating with the puck or tendency to pass first

I seem to have a bit of a problem. During games, I tend to look for a person to pass to who's either ahead of me or is on the fly (skating up the ice quickly). This is beginning to bug me since its not like I can't skate with the puck myself. And when I do skate with the puck, I feel a bit selfish since I can move the puck up the ice faster with a pass.

Do you think this is just a mental barrier? Has anyone else felt similar? If so, what did you do to overcome it?

Thanks

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06-26-2012, 06:09 PM
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Pointteen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rayau View Post
I seem to have a bit of a problem. During games, I tend to look for a person to pass to who's either ahead of me or is on the fly (skating up the ice quickly). This is beginning to bug me since its not like I can't skate with the puck myself. And when I do skate with the puck, I feel a bit selfish since I can move the puck up the ice faster with a pass.

Do you think this is just a mental barrier? Has anyone else felt similar? If so, what did you do to overcome it?

Thanks


I can think of two things.
A few years ago I broke my collar bone (Well, the guy buttending me to avoid a check did). I missed a month and when I came back my shot was awful. I should've worked the muscles but didn't.
For the rest of that season I almost refused to shoot.
Then most of the season after. One of my ex teammates was Reffing my game and he asked me 'why aren't you shooting? You could snipe it on this goalie easy'. ironically, I said 'this is why' and then next shift I put one right inside the post. Just like that, my shot was back.

I believed I lost it, got an injection of confidence. Everything worked out from that.
Do you practice? If so, work on moving up ice with the puck. Refuse to pass until you hit their blueline unless you can giftwrap a goal.

Other theory is you're playing with guys who you think are better than you. If so, why are they better neutral zone players? Think the game out slowly in retrospect. Notice what they do, try and implement it into your own game. If it doesn't work immediately, work on it.

It sounds like you need confidence. Having the skill sounds like it isn't the issue. You just need to believe you can do it. You can will things to happen with sheer effort out there. Thats half of Mike Richards' game.

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06-26-2012, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rayau View Post
I seem to have a bit of a problem. During games, I tend to look for a person to pass to...
...I feel a bit selfish since I can move the puck up the ice faster with a pass.

Do you think this is just a mental barrier? Has anyone else felt similar? If so, what did you do to overcome it?

Thanks
nothing to overcome...
really a situational thing
a puck always moves way faster than a skater, and in game play you want to create advantage, not dangle.
dependin
if in the defensive zone, sometimes you gotta make the safe pass, sometimes you gotta grunt it up.
if anything, feeling guilty might be a small issue
if you're lookin for an opportunity as you move it up ice - heads-up play is never a bad thing.
...if you're not movin to support or cover, after you make the pass, then that's a problem.
most of the game is played off the puck

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06-26-2012, 07:30 PM
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TwistedWristah
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Sounds simple, but just go with your gut. Don't start passing all the time just to pass. Usually your first instinct on whether to pass or carry it instead is right. I had this issue years ago when I was much younger. Started to just pass if someone was wide open ahead of me to overcome it.

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06-26-2012, 08:54 PM
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johnjm22
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Are you a newer player?

Sounds like you're a little uptight, and it's causing you to over think.

As you gain more experience you'll learn to relax a little more and trust your instincts.

I think playing as often as possible (against other people, not by yourself) is the solution. Play a lot of pick up games, and allow yourself to be a little bit selfish with the puck sometimes. You'll learn some composure this way, and it won't really matter if you make glaring mistakes or turn overs because it's just a pick up game.

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06-27-2012, 09:29 AM
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Stickchecked
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I vote for being a little selfish as well.

I often feel this dilemma. But I've come to approach it from a different direction than debate "pass or skate more?" I try to focus more on being aware of where the other skaters are before getting to the puck. Because there are times you need to skate. And there are times you need to pass. Work at recognizing the difference and you'll stop the internal debate and focus more on doing the right thing.

But even in this context, I would err on the side of skating because your natural instinct will be to pass too often.

This situational awareness will also allow you to apologize to the better players when you should have passed. Everyone makes bad plays so people appreciate when people acknowledge it. It also starts a dialogue and shows that you're thinking and trying to do the right thing out there.

I'll say one more thing as a sort-of-beginner starting to feel semi-competent. I find that most of the good players on the ice (in pickups) are pretty "generous" in that they give a break to a player who's working to get better. A lot of that involves getting the confidence to skate with the puck, even if a pass is a better play. I doubt anyone will give you a hard time for skating with the puck. (Unless you've seriously overextended your shift. HA!)

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06-27-2012, 09:34 AM
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Jarick
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If you're hitting them with good passes as they are moving up the ice ahead of you or with more speed, that's a good thing. If you're dumping the puck just to get rid of it because you're afraid of losing it, that's a bad thing.

Which would you say it is?

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06-27-2012, 10:36 AM
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Devil Dancer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rayau View Post
If so, what did you do to overcome it?
I used to be a pass-first guy, to a fault. This might sound terrible, but I overcame it by playing for a terrible team with few scoring threats. Because I knew that passing it usually meant a turnover, I learned to be more selfish with the puck because I was much more likely to generate a scoring chance than my teammates were.

I still overpass when I'm playing up, but not as much as I used to.

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06-28-2012, 08:16 AM
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rayau
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Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
If you're hitting them with good passes as they are moving up the ice ahead of you or with more speed, that's a good thing. If you're dumping the puck just to get rid of it because you're afraid of losing it, that's a bad thing.

Which would you say it is?
I'm definitely not dumping the puck just to get rid of it. I make a decision based on teammates on the move and target them with passes to get the puck up the ice faster. Maybe I 'think' I see them moving faster and opt to hit them with passes. I've just been noticing that I do that a lot.


Quote:
Originally Posted by johnjm22 View Post
Are you a newer player?
I wish I could say I'm a newer player, but the truth is I'm not. I've played for years

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Old
06-28-2012, 08:23 AM
  #10
rayau
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnjm22 View Post

I think playing as often as possible (against other people, not by yourself) is the solution. Play a lot of pick up games, and allow yourself to be a little bit selfish with the puck sometimes. You'll learn some composure this way, and it won't really matter if you make glaring mistakes or turn overs because it's just a pick up game.
I think that's a good suggestion. I have been attending stick & puck sessions, but haven't had a lot of time for drop-in games due to my schedule. I'll have to make an effort to go out for a few games; and maybe just be a little selfish

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06-28-2012, 09:07 AM
  #11
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Sounds like your playing good hockey to me. The thing I like to see teams doing is crossing the blue line with speed. Knowing how and when to headman is important.

What I like to do is if the defense is stepping up on me... lure them in, chip it past them or make an east/ west pass to a supporting player. Sounds so simple but the lure is the important part as your opening up lanes for supporting players.

If they back off you, build up speed and back that defender up. It will open up the entire top of the defensive zone for you to get off a shot or drop to team mate.

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06-28-2012, 12:51 PM
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hockeyisforeveryone
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^I agree. No need to overthink, just make the best play. It may be a dump in, or back to the D, there's no way to plan the split second decisions we have to make in the game. More often passing is the way to go, but if you have the opportunity take it. Whatever works, score a goal!

Watching hockey in the 1950's, the theory was every player tried to deke through all 5 opponents and score the goal. Only when that wasn't working out would they dish off a pass. It keeps the other team honest. Every player is a threat and thinking 1st of driving the puck into the net. Players today need to be a little more "selfish" like Bobby Orr. Pass-first players (like myself) are actually weaker and incomplete if they miss a better chance to score in favor of passing it to someone else.

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06-28-2012, 12:58 PM
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Jarick
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Yeah I don't see what the problem is, some guys are selfish goal scorers (like me) and some guys are smart play makers (like you). I can't think like you do, and you can't think like I do. Find a good selfish guy and team up and rack up the points!

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06-28-2012, 11:44 PM
  #14
WithOutPaperss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
I used to be a pass-first guy, to a fault. This might sound terrible, but I overcame it by playing for a terrible team with few scoring threats. Because I knew that passing it usually meant a turnover, I learned to be more selfish with the puck because I was much more likely to generate a scoring chance than my teammates were.

I still overpass when I'm playing up, but not as much as I used to.
This is what happened to me too. For my whole hockey 'career' I've never had more than maybe 10 goals a year, but a ton of assists. I passed it too much though, almost refusing to shot.

One year I played on a team that won a total of 3 games all season and playoffs. This is how I started carrying it up. I was one of the best players on the team (yeah sounds cocky), so I started carrying it a bit more, I wasn't a huge ****** though, I still passed it.

Nice to see someone with the same 'fix'

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