HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

how to get kids into hockey

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
07-23-2012, 11:56 AM
  #1
rh71
Registered User
 
rh71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 561
vCash: 500
how to get kids into hockey

for some reason searching for this isn't resulting in anything... I have twin boys now 4 years old and I've taken them ice skating like 3 times the last year. Each time they'd get on and barely know how to skate but by the end of the session they can pretty much move around with just me holding 1 hand with random falls of course. It's also difficult since one has to sit while I take the other one around.

They have hockey programs but is it wise to just throw them out there with the instructors or do I get them into regular skating school first? Do I just keep doing what I'm doing for a bit longer and more frequent? They like hockey since we loosely play at home... just not sure how to best get them into ice hockey. Should I start with getting them their own skates - was reluctant because of the constant growth thing. I personally started at 17.

I recently played in a men's league with a 16 year old kid and he was flying around like the rest of us were standing still - and I'm not exactly slow. I want my kids to be him.


Last edited by rh71: 07-23-2012 at 12:02 PM.
rh71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 12:18 PM
  #2
oStealthKiller
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 170
vCash: 500
id recommend buying those skates that have two blades on them for a few skates to build up there confidence before getting them real skates. also, for the falling, just work on balance for now and eventually the technique will develop

oStealthKiller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 12:39 PM
  #3
esidebill
Registered User
 
esidebill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Long Island, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 365
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
for some reason searching for this isn't resulting in anything... I have twin boys now 4 years old and I've taken them ice skating like 3 times the last year. Each time they'd get on and barely know how to skate but by the end of the session they can pretty much move around with just me holding 1 hand with random falls of course. It's also difficult since one has to sit while I take the other one around.

They have hockey programs but is it wise to just throw them out there with the instructors or do I get them into regular skating school first? Do I just keep doing what I'm doing for a bit longer and more frequent? They like hockey since we loosely play at home... just not sure how to best get them into ice hockey. Should I start with getting them their own skates - was reluctant because of the constant growth thing. I personally started at 17.

I recently played in a men's league with a 16 year old kid and he was flying around like the rest of us were standing still - and I'm not exactly slow. I want my kids to be him.
You're a Long Islander? Do you skate at the Rinx? Anywho, I'd say find a nice accommodating program for them to learn how to skate better and maybe work into a hockey program as well. As far as skates, junior skates run cheap because of the fact kids feet grow quickly. Just buy a size where they have some growing room. I'm a firm believer that if they want to play, they will beg you to play.

esidebill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 12:46 PM
  #4
Rink Bum
Registered User
 
Rink Bum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 34
vCash: 500
I have two kids - a girl and a boy. I started them off with Learn to Skate programs.

Both my kids started off about four years ago with my son at the age of nine while my daughter started off at age five. My son was able to go on his own, whereas my daughter we signed up for a parent and child program. The programs would teach basic steps and also the ability to get up after falling down. After six sessions, my daughter was able to move about on her own as well as get up. She was walking and taking short glides. I was a bit skeptical thinking the Learn to Skate programs would not help much, but it helps alot based on how my kids developed their skating.

For my son, after some skating lessons, I signed him up for hockey lessons where the emphasis was to simply learn some skating, a scrimmage, and to have fun. My son was better than most kids since he was taking skating lessons, but I've seen kids who were walking on skates and eventually by the end of the season, they would be skating.

It is quite amazing at how fast kids learn. They'll fall, they'll wipe out, but they get up and keep going. They'll meet other kids, and friendships.

You can head to Play It Again shops or something similar where there are some used skates. I started off with used since the kid's feet are always growing. However, get proper fitting skates for your kids.

Helmets are mandatory. Get some cheap used elbow pads for your boys, and maybe some knee pads. Sign them for skating lessons and also a hockey program. At their age, pretty much all the kids would be walking on ice, eventually start gliding, and then skating. Since you are already playing some hockey at home, keep that up so they have fun and maintain their interest in the sport.

Rink Bum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 01:29 PM
  #5
ComradeChris
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 573
vCash: 1004
How to get your kid to love the game:

1) Chase your dream to make the NHL as far as you can go. (Can't be a parent until you honestly try pursuing your dreams)
2) Have kids with a wife with a big uterus. (Gives your kid a size advantage starting from conception)
3) Let hockey stay your life's biggest passion. More than the women.
4) Play hockey with your kids as soon as they can hold a mini stick.
5) Be a goalie and let them score. Scream and holler to get them to love your appraisal for doing something. Positively reward their behavior when playing.
6) Teach your kids how to ice skate. Be there with them on the ice.
7) Continue playing hockey with them and get their friends in the neighborhood to get into it.
8) Take them to NHL games while doing all of this RARELY. Do not take them to every game. It has to be a special thing, a privilege for them.
9) Continue to tell them they have what it takes to go wherever they want to with hockey. If they want the NHL they can do it. Be there supporting them 100% of the way.
10) In the end it is their choice. Get them started with hockey. Let them play as long as they want and continue standing by their side.
11) If they wish to travel and work on making it to the NHL. Be there to challenge them to take their game to the next level always. Positive reinforcement needs to come a lot less here. BUT there still needs to be some appraisal. He started hockey to prove something to you so let him prove it.

The kid will become a great hockey player and could end up making it into the NHL. It all starts with your passion as a father though. Just some thoughts from a guy with 17 years of hockey experience.

P.S. Bonus points if you start off as his coach.

ComradeChris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 01:49 PM
  #6
beth
Registered User
 
beth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Bellevue, WA
Country: United States
Posts: 538
vCash: 500
You really have to let them come to it themselves. Just go out and have fun. Get them their own skates (that fit, not with room to grow) and also padding will make learning less painful. Don't push them, let them rest as much as they want, just make it really fun.

My son was the first hockey player in the family, we thought it would be perfect for him as he's sort of rough and tumble. He loved it for about a year and was awesome, but once his mom and sister got into it, he quit. I think he sees it as a girl thing now. lol! My daughter came into it on her own. She was older and she still needs to catch up, but she likes being able to call herself a hockey player.

Also, if you take away the tv and computer games as entertainment options, they'll be on the lookout for something to do. Just toss them outside with some street sticks instead.

beth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 02:14 PM
  #7
krax
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 231
vCash: 500
All very valuable inputs. Special mention to ComradeChris.

Coaching your own kids can be very rewarding. Though it can get problematic once it becomes competitive.

If your boys ask for hockey, just go for it. Ask them after the first practice if they liked it. If they do, let them continue. There are a lot of kids starting at 3 or 4, having a lot of fun.

Skating lessons are a plus. Not sure if they're going to like it.... it's not always fun...

I'd recommend the full hockey equipment. It's fun to put on and to fall with it. I know of places where you can rent the equipment. Maybe you can buy it used from other parents.

I'd recommend their own skates. My boy started organized hockey at 3.5. I bought really cheap skates until the age of 9. Neither him nor me liked the high-end stuff, which are basically small adult skates. I think soft skates helped his development.

Between 9 and 12 we bought mid range skates (Bauer Vapor XXII, Bauer Vapor X40). He got his first pro model this year (Bauer X60 on sale for 200$) at age 13.

I'll come back once he's 18 to tell you how all this turned out ;-)

krax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 02:26 PM
  #8
AIREAYE
Registered User
 
AIREAYE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: China
Posts: 3,133
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by oStealthKiller View Post
id recommend buying those skates that have two blades on them for a few skates to build up there confidence before getting them real skates. also, for the falling, just work on balance for now and eventually the technique will develop
Noooo, those bob-skates are detrimental in learning how to skate.

AIREAYE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 02:29 PM
  #9
Steelhead16
Registered User
 
Steelhead16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Boise, ID
Country: United States
Posts: 1,529
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by oStealthKiller View Post
id recommend buying those skates that have two blades on them for a few skates to build up there confidence before getting them real skates. also, for the falling, just work on balance for now and eventually the technique will develop

As someone who has taught beginners skating as well as beginning hockey PLEASE DO NOT DO THIS! This would be like teaching your kids to walk backwards at first and then sending them out into the world. Don't make an instructor undo this, it will frustrate your kids and they will quit skating.

To build a strong house you need a strong foundation to start from. Same with hockey. I would highly reccomend that you give your kids skating lessons first. No sticks, no pucks. Hockey is hard enough to learn when you are having to learn to skate at the same time. As soon as they can skate well then move to the beginning hockey classes and they will have a much easier time learning all the hockey skills.

Most people who are teaching the beginner hockey programs are coming from a hockey background and aren't usually there to teach your kids how to skate. They naturally gravitate towards the kids who have the most ability and take to the hockey skills part. The kids who need the most skating help seem to get the least amount of attention and don't progress as fast. The instructors don't purposely ignore any kids but it's difficult to teach the other 10 kids when 1 of them needs so much attention.

My suggestion to you if you want to fast track this is to get them private lessons with a skating instructor. If cost is an issue then my second choice would be to enroll them in skating classes. Build a foundation and they will be flying around you by the time they are 10.

Steelhead16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 02:36 PM
  #10
TickleMeYandle
Not so fast,
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Jamaica
Posts: 1,256
vCash: 500
My daughter (almost 8 yrs old) just started. She's taking a hockey 1 class - they're doing forwards, backwards, stopping, falling and supposedly will get into crossovers a little bit towards the end of the 9-week class. After hockey 1 she'll take hockey 2 - crossovers, hockey stops, faster skating & gliding, transitions, etc.

Once she's done hockey 2, they have a class called initiation. This is where they do the basic stickhandling, shooting, passing, rules of the game, positions, etc. After that she should be ready to go into a league.

I've been taking her to public session and we'll be going to stick time this week. She's pretty excited to finally get to use her stick. I'll practice passing with her and just skating around with the puck a little bit.

It's amazing how fast they pick it up. She could barely skate 3 weeks ago. I am pretty sure that within a few months, she'll be a better skater than I am - certainly more confident!

TickleMeYandle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 02:50 PM
  #11
johnny1976
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 51
vCash: 500
That's the age I taught my son how to skate. I took him open skating and made a game out of it. I had him hold onto the boards and go at his own pace and after a while made a game out of it. Once I saw him able to skate ten or so feet I said I bet you can't make it from the goal line to the blue line without falling. Well after an hour he was making it around the whole rink. Make it fun for them, but let them get use to it on their own.

About the skates go buy entry model hockey skates. Don't buy anything more than a $40 to $50 skate because in my opinion you will be wasting money. Don't buy the double blades.

Look into local hockey programs and see what they are all about. If you're in Long Island I'm sure your program is apart of USA hockey and they are very firm about teaching kids how to skate at such a young age. Also I know when I coached I grouped our kids based on talent level so nobody would feel out of place and would spend extra time teaching kids that were new to skating or were having a tough go at it.

Just make sure they are having fun and don't worry about it because the best kid today might not be the best kid in the future.

johnny1976 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 02:53 PM
  #12
rh71
Registered User
 
rh71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 561
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by esidebill View Post
You're a Long Islander? Do you skate at the Rinx? Anywho, I'd say find a nice accommodating program for them to learn how to skate better and maybe work into a hockey program as well. As far as skates, junior skates run cheap because of the fact kids feet grow quickly. Just buy a size where they have some growing room. I'm a firm believer that if they want to play, they will beg you to play.
no we're at Bethpage - nice new(ish) rink there and that's where I also play pick up when not a league game.

to everyone thx for all the advice so far - will be taking them more often and get them some basic gear too. Two at a time is rough... money and time. Just hope that the hockey programs will take "hockey beginners" when they're like 5 or 6?

I do wish to coach kids at some point since that's a lot more fun than standing at the sidelines for an hour+.


Last edited by rh71: 07-23-2012 at 02:58 PM.
rh71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 02:58 PM
  #13
Canadiens1958
Moderator
 
Canadiens1958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 10,458
vCash: 500
Learn to Skate

The key is a Learn to Skate Program. The good programs admit kids from three onwards and are oriented to skating not a single sport like hockey. The program should be linked and supported by the various local programs, hockey, figure skating, ice dance, speed skating - long and short track.

The linkage is important since it allows the various programs to contribute the older kids or coaches as instructors. This keeps the program going with access to knowledge about what is required for the different sports. The extra financing may be acquired from various job creation programs or foundations that promote positive youth activities.

A comment about "cheese cutters" - double bladed skates. Popular into the early 1960's, they actually produced some of the better NHL skaters during their time. Today there are better accessories that allow the little people to learn how to skate.


Last edited by Canadiens1958: 07-23-2012 at 02:59 PM. Reason: typo
Canadiens1958 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 05:04 PM
  #14
ArcataShark
Self/EnTitled
 
ArcataShark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Eugene
Country: United States
Posts: 653
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ComradeChris View Post
How to get your kid to love the game:

1) Chase your dream to make the NHL as far as you can go. (Can't be a parent until you honestly try pursuing your dreams)
2) Have kids with a wife with a big uterus. (Gives your kid a size advantage starting from conception)
3) Let hockey stay your life's biggest passion. More than the women.
4) Play hockey with your kids as soon as they can hold a mini stick.
5) Be a goalie and let them score. Scream and holler to get them to love your appraisal for doing something. Positively reward their behavior when playing.
6) Teach your kids how to ice skate. Be there with them on the ice.
7) Continue playing hockey with them and get their friends in the neighborhood to get into it.
8) Take them to NHL games while doing all of this RARELY. Do not take them to every game. It has to be a special thing, a privilege for them.
9) Continue to tell them they have what it takes to go wherever they want to with hockey. If they want the NHL they can do it. Be there supporting them 100% of the way.
10) In the end it is their choice. Get them started with hockey. Let them play as long as they want and continue standing by their side.
11) If they wish to travel and work on making it to the NHL. Be there to challenge them to take their game to the next level always. Positive reinforcement needs to come a lot less here. BUT there still needs to be some appraisal. He started hockey to prove something to you so let him prove it.

The kid will become a great hockey player and could end up making it into the NHL. It all starts with your passion as a father though. Just some thoughts from a guy with 17 years of hockey experience.

P.S. Bonus points if you start off as his coach.
So...how do you go about screening for this trait on dates? I would love to know..

ArcataShark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 06:01 PM
  #15
theFinn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 37
vCash: 500
I don't know how it works in the US but is there a local Minor Hockey Association? A group that runs local youth hockey under the over-arching umbrella of USA Hockey?

If so, find that group. Up here in Canada we start at the 'initiation' level that handles kids between 3 and 6, is there something like that? (Quick googling only shows the 'Mite' level as 8 and under... my kids started age 3 and 4, maybe we're spoiled up here..)

A learn to skate program is fine but I feel that kids learn faster at a structured hockey practice than they do in one of these programs, plus they're fully geared up so if they fall down it doesn't hurt and they quickly lose any fear of wiping out. Plus they're learning how to skate in the context of hockey and getting them into actually playing the game faster which develops an enjoyment of the game.

theFinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 06:20 PM
  #16
CLF4life
Bourque ** Lidstrom
 
CLF4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Niagara Falls.Ont
Country: Canada
Posts: 233
vCash: 500
My boy wanted to play soccer,"which I encouraged" I got him into hockey by just spending a lot of time with him taking shots against the garage door, many Ice Dogs games and visiting the HHOF did tons for him.
He now plays ball/ice hockey and lacrosse and loves it.

CLF4life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-23-2012, 08:13 PM
  #17
rwr
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 65
vCash: 500
The best advice I can give you is what has already been said.


LEARN TO SKATE program, this pains me to say but figure skaters WILL beable to teach you kid how to skate properly. He will learn balance and edges the easiest this way. Some of the best hockey players I know, learned to skate this way


Once he can skate, learning hockey is much easier

My 2 cents

rwr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-24-2012, 01:02 PM
  #18
Beardacus
Ice 1 - Brodeur 0
 
Beardacus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NYC
Country: United States
Posts: 1,278
vCash: 500
I took my boy skating just for something we could do together, and once he started seeing boys coming in and out for hockey programs he started asking questions. Once he was skating on his own I put him into an Atoms program, and now hockey is all that comes out of his mouth.

Beardacus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-25-2012, 12:38 PM
  #19
ComradeChris
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 573
vCash: 1004
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcataShark View Post
So...how do you go about screening for this trait on dates? I would love to know..
Hips don't lie.

ComradeChris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-25-2012, 03:55 PM
  #20
TieClark
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 3,689
vCash: 500
Play hockey... seriously. Skating for kids can be very boring, but throw a stick and a puck into it and suddenly it's a whole lot of fun.

TieClark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-25-2012, 07:19 PM
  #21
TickleMeYandle
Not so fast,
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Jamaica
Posts: 1,256
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by TieClark View Post
Play hockey... seriously. Skating for kids can be very boring, but throw a stick and a puck into it and suddenly it's a whole lot of fun.
This is true for adults too, but for different reasons.

I took my daughter to public session a few weeks ago and she hung on to the wall the whole time. She was wearing full pads, but still was scared to move away. The next time I took her, I didn't skate with her but just sent her out there on her own (with pads). At first she hung on to the wall, but then a couple of the hockey kids out there started a little game of tag. She forgot about the fact that she was afraid and 'couldn't' skate and just started having fun. Now she's not afraid to skate and she's starting to really move out there. At her first LTS lesson she was probably one of the worst skaters, but at the second LTS she won both of the races the teacher had them do.

At the adult beginner class, we do about 1hr of drills - skating, passing, shooting, etc. We've been doing a lot of edgework, transitions, etc. During the drills everyone goes slowly and it seems they are almost scared to really push themselves. You can see some of the drills (esp. towards the beginning of the league - when about 50% of us had never played hockey before and had only done public session) and think NO WAY are these people going to be able to play an actual game.

Then once the game starts, everyone is so crazy for the puck that they forget that they don't really know how to skate. Things that were tentative and slow during drills just seem to happen naturally during the scrimmage. People don't worry about falling, they don't even think about it because they are so focused on the puck!

So I would say that once the kid has the basics down so that they won't kill themselves by constantly falling in front of oncoming skaters and being unable to get back up, let them try a game. It's 100 times more fun than drills and makes it much more addictive.

TickleMeYandle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-25-2012, 07:35 PM
  #22
Nazem Gretzky
Eller 4 Selke
 
Nazem Gretzky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Francais-land
Country: France
Posts: 9,936
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Nazem Gretzky
This sort of depends on your location but I speak from experience (as a kid) when I say:

If you can build your kid an outdoor rink, their skating and game will improve at a ridculous pace, especially if they love being out there.

Nazem Gretzky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-26-2012, 10:09 PM
  #23
Bruwinz37
Registered User
 
Bruwinz37's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Country: United States
Posts: 26,663
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by oStealthKiller View Post
id recommend buying those skates that have two blades on them for a few skates to build up there confidence before getting them real skates. also, for the falling, just work on balance for now and eventually the technique will develop
If they have been skating already DO NOT DO THIS.

Let the skate around, fall, get back after it...maybe use a milk crate for balance. Then if they like it sign them up for a learn to skate program or a Mite in house program. Bring them as often as they show that they are having fun and always smile at them no matter what.

Bruwinz37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-29-2012, 04:25 PM
  #24
judge301
Registered User
 
judge301's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 491
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
As someone who has taught beginners skating as well as beginning hockey PLEASE DO NOT DO THIS! This would be like teaching your kids to walk backwards at first and then sending them out into the world. Don't make an instructor undo this, it will frustrate your kids and they will quit skating.

To build a strong house you need a strong foundation to start from. Same with hockey. I would highly reccomend that you give your kids skating lessons first. No sticks, no pucks. Hockey is hard enough to learn when you are having to learn to skate at the same time. As soon as they can skate well then move to the beginning hockey classes and they will have a much easier time learning all the hockey skills.

Most people who are teaching the beginner hockey programs are coming from a hockey background and aren't usually there to teach your kids how to skate. They naturally gravitate towards the kids who have the most ability and take to the hockey skills part. The kids who need the most skating help seem to get the least amount of attention and don't progress as fast. The instructors don't purposely ignore any kids but it's difficult to teach the other 10 kids when 1 of them needs so much attention.

My suggestion to you if you want to fast track this is to get them private lessons with a skating instructor. If cost is an issue then my second choice would be to enroll them in skating classes. Build a foundation and they will be flying around you by the time they are 10.
Yup, this. I have been my son`s coach ever since he started playing. I also coached my daughter`s ringette team for about 8 years (until she got to be a better and faster skater than I). I started playing at age 3. Avoid the bob skates and let them learn right.

Also, Hockey USA has a great program for teaching kids the game. If you do a google search for `hockey USA practice plans`you`ll find great info on helping your kid learn. I am a level 3 coach in Hockey Canada and many times throughout the years have prefered and found I get better results from the kids when I employ Hockey USA development plans. 6 years coaching him and 4 league championships speak for themselves. There is nothing more rewarding than watching all the kids develop, not just your own. I do many things on my own initiative such as monthly skill progress reports that give each player a measure of his or her progress. I find it really helps to keep them motivated and working hard to see and be rewarded by the monthly progress. But most important is to make sure they are having fun learning. There are many ways to incorporate games into the learning process that make the child forget that he is on skates and just start moving.

Good luck.

judge301 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-30-2012, 01:59 PM
  #25
LateNightOilerFan
Registered User
 
LateNightOilerFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 880
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
to everyone thx for all the advice so far - will be taking them more often and get them some basic gear too. Two at a time is rough... money and time. Just hope that the hockey programs will take "hockey beginners" when they're like 5 or 6?
I was in the same situation having two at the same time - not twins but they were ages 4 & 6 and we started them together. At the time our daughter (age 6) just wanted to skate and our son (age 4) wasn't as keen for hockey so it was less intimidating for him to just do skating lessons.

The full hockey gear learn to skate programs are very good, but sometimes it depends on the child - I know a few parents who went that route and their kids hated the gear and hated the lessons as a result and you don't want that to happen.

Not sure if you have this option but the community rec centre learn to skate programs were perfect for our situation - we didn't want to push our son too much (he wasn't sure he wanted to be out there) and even though that was 10 years ago, those lessons are still only around $40 for 10 half hour sessions and the ratio was about 1 instructor to 5-6 kids so we figured if he didn't like it then we wouldn't have spent alot of money. We bought them the proper hockey helmets and good skates but just used elbow and knee pads under their snow pants/jackets and both our kids liked that they didn't have a lot of gear. Again, it depends on your kids. Some kids like the gear at an early age.

At any rate, our daughter got what she wanted out of it - being able to skate with her friends - and our son now plays high school hockey. He did lessons for a couple years before he was really interested in hockey (he was 7 when he started organized hockey) and then he did a lot of power skating after he was in hockey and the sport soon became his passion. I'm glad we went the route we did to ease him into it - but again that was what worked for him, other kids might jump into it with full gear right away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TieClark View Post
Play hockey... seriously. Skating for kids can be very boring, but throw a stick and a puck into it and suddenly it's a whole lot of fun.
I think an experienced, enthusiastic instructor can put the fun into skating lessons though and would caution that if you do that too early/right from the beginning, some kids will use their stick too much to balance themselves (they turn into little triangles/human pylons) and it's harder for them to learn proper balance when you take the stick away after they have been using it that way. Same as when you're teaching kids to ski, poles aren't introduced until they've learned to balance with just the skis. If you can get the kids walking, marching and then gliding on skates and pushing off with the least amount of support possible you're really helping the strength of their skating ability for the future.

The other point of caution is some kids are intimidated by the "swarm hockey" that results at an early age - my son was - he was so happy when he got to Novice and started to learn positioning because it wasn't 10 kids on the ice all going after the puck at the same time. He was smaller than most of the kids and it really intimidated him.

LateNightOilerFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:35 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.