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Wrist Shots: setup in practice versus game situation

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07-30-2012, 10:36 PM
  #1
rayuelo
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Wrist Shots: setup in practice versus game situation

I've been studying the wrist shot through books, youtube, etc, but am not quite sure about what I think is a key component ...

All the instructionals I've seen has the player in a static, 90 degree to the target position when they demonstrate and explain the wrist shot. This is all fine and dandy when practicing on dryland or on ice, and though far from perfect, I understand the mechanics.

My question is ... how does this translate to real playing situations. I mean, you are likely never to be in that static, perfect 90 degree position in a game situation, but would need to execute a wrister while skating up into the offensive zone.

What are some common steps to get you into that perpendicular position? I can think of turning (crossing over once or twice to the strong side, or a tight turn in the same direction) to get there but I'd love to hear explanations or see examples.

Can anyone help?

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07-30-2012, 10:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rayuelo View Post
I've been studying the wrist shot through books, youtube, etc, but am not quite sure about what I think is a key component ...

All the instructionals I've seen has the player in a static, 90 degree to the target position when they demonstrate and explain the wrist shot. This is all fine and dandy when practicing on dryland or on ice, and though far from perfect, I understand the mechanics.

My question is ... how does this translate to real playing situations. I mean, you are likely never to be in that static, perfect 90 degree position in a game situation, but would need to execute a wrister while skating up into the offensive zone.

What are some common steps to get you into that perpendicular position? I can think of turning (crossing over once or twice to the strong side, or a tight turn in the same direction) to get there but I'd love to hear explanations or see examples.

Can anyone help?
Honestly, your best bet is to just start slow, skate with the puck (do whatever moves you wish) and once you get to the net just shoot it. Then as you get good with that go faster and faster.

I mean the point of the wrist shot is that its suppose to be quick and surprising without a lot of set up. You don't necessarily have to be perpendicular, I can take one parallel to the net. Just practice, practice, practice

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07-30-2012, 10:55 PM
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Originally Posted by hlaverty06 View Post
Honestly, your best bet is to just start slow, skate with the puck (do whatever moves you wish) and once you get to the net just shoot it. Then as you get good with that go faster and faster.

I mean the point of the wrist shot is that its suppose to be quick and surprising without a lot of set up. You don't necessarily have to be perpendicular, I can take one parallel to the net. Just practice, practice, practice
That sounds doable ... I was under the impression from all the instructional stuff where they get you to practice perpendicular that you had to somehow get that way in game-play.

But ... when I see still photos of NHL players taking shots, I see that some get their leading skate perpendicular to the target. It seems to be the case in at least half of the photos of not only wrist shots, but also snaps and slappers.

Maybe I shouldn't focus so much on the "point in time" position of the body.

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07-30-2012, 11:55 PM
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not sure how much help this is but, most likely the pics. that have players perpendicular to the target are do to them "shooting in stride"...which, is something that all skaters should get good at....its just as effective as the "pull/drag" then snap/wrister...i would moreso focus on shooting in stride and pull/drag

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07-31-2012, 08:23 AM
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The 'stationary' wrist shot is just to get you into doing the motions and understanding how a wrist shot works.

When you can take a good hard, fast wrist shot standing still, start skating and taking a wrist shot while skating.

I'm right handed and find shooting off my right leg is easiest so find whatever is most comfortable for you and work on shooting a wrist shot off that leg while moving.

Finally do it on your 'weak' leg!
This is very important as you will then be able to fire great wrist shots off either leg, meaning you can shoot anytime, anywhere and are very unpredictable, it makes it harder for a goalie to get a read on you.

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07-31-2012, 09:33 AM
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In my opinion, the first step in learning the wrist shot is the mechanics and being able to load your stick, generate power, and maintain your balance.

You start to learn those three things from a "perfect" position at first, then start moving in to the shot.

Finally, once you can comfortably shoot in motion, start shooting from all angles and locations.

In practice, you almost never shoot from a "perfect" position, but off the rush, from the boards, even from the goal crease trying to chip it in (good to practice that as well).

The more situations you practice, the more you will execute without thinking in a game situation, which is critical for success.

Here's my video about the basics of wrist shots FWIW. I learned to shoot by learning these fundamentals off ice from a stand still, then walking in to the shot, then performing on ice, and finally shooting from all angles and locations.


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07-31-2012, 06:36 PM
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Thanks for all the tips everyone! All makes sense now. Now time to practice armed with all the good info!

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08-04-2012, 12:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
In my opinion, the first step in learning the wrist shot is the mechanics and being able to load your stick, generate power, and maintain your balance.

You start to learn those three things from a "perfect" position at first, then start moving in to the shot.

Finally, once you can comfortably shoot in motion, start shooting from all angles and locations.

In practice, you almost never shoot from a "perfect" position, but off the rush, from the boards, even from the goal crease trying to chip it in (good to practice that as well).

The more situations you practice, the more you will execute without thinking in a game situation, which is critical for success.

Here's my video about the basics of wrist shots FWIW. I learned to shoot by learning these fundamentals off ice from a stand still, then walking in to the shot, then performing on ice, and finally shooting from all angles and locations.

Good video Jarick, but every time I see it I just feel like I have to say that what stick flex you use shouldn't be completely dependent on your height OR weight. If I just went ahead and did what this video told me, I would be using at least an 85 flex because I'm 6'2", which is actually too stiff for me. I'm a pretty light-weight guy (only 165 lbs) so I have to go with something a little more whippier in a 70/75 flex. You really have to take into account how strong you are and how much weight you actually put into your shots.

Not disrespecting Jarick's video because he has a lot of good stuff in there, just trying to clear up something that might have seemed a little misleading in the video.

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08-04-2012, 07:41 AM
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It's a starting point for people who literally have no idea what they should be doing when buying a hockey stick.

I'd say at 6'2 you're probably more an exception to the rule. A buddy of mine is 6' even and your weight and he can't use anything under 85 because it whips too much, and he's not a strong guy at all. Just PP.

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08-04-2012, 07:49 AM
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Pretty much as already stated, get out there and throw the puck on net. Until you get to the point where you can do that the videos are really useless. You need to at least be able to get the puck on net before you need to start analyzing your shot.

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08-04-2012, 07:00 PM
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It's a starting point for people who literally have no idea what they should be doing when buying a hockey stick.

I'd say at 6'2 you're probably more an exception to the rule. A buddy of mine is 6' even and your weight and he can't use anything under 85 because it whips too much, and he's not a strong guy at all. Just PP.
How does he get any flex in his stick during wrist/snap shots? I mean, guys like Ovi and Kessel use 75 flex sticks because they know the whippiness will add power to their shots... and they're heavier and stronger than me and your friend lol. Maybe your friend just likes having a stick that is real stiff?

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08-04-2012, 07:48 PM
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This video might help you out rayuelo. I almost exclusively use what he calls the "quick release" wristshot for the reasons you mentioned in your original post. I'm rarely at a perfect 90 degree angle to the goalie when receiving the puck and it's tough to toss that style of wristshot while in stride.

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08-05-2012, 11:41 AM
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Thanks again for the ongoing tips all.

I've been practicing and already after a few days, I notice an improvement. I'm also getting more on top of the puck which seems to help with putting weight behind it when on skates.

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08-06-2012, 01:32 AM
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Hey guys, I have a question about my wrist shot so I figured I'd post it in here instead of making a whole new thread for it.. Up until the other day, my wrist/snap shots were flying nice and straight and not fluttering or "wobbling" too much in the air. Well, the other day I was skating on the ice alone just practicing my shots and I noticed that I couldn't really get the puck to stay flat in the air. Obviously, the puck's velocity was suffering from this. With slap shots the puck would stay perfectly flat, saucer passes as well... but with my wrist shot, it seemed as though something changed. I was making sure that I was following through and pointing at my target, and my shots were accurate because of this but the puck was still fluttering.

Any tips/suggestions?

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08-06-2012, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Fanned On It View Post
How does he get any flex in his stick during wrist/snap shots? I mean, guys like Ovi and Kessel use 75 flex sticks because they know the whippiness will add power to their shots... and they're heavier and stronger than me and your friend lol. Maybe your friend just likes having a stick that is real stiff?
He gets the "recommended" 1-2 inches of loading because he's tall enough to use the stick just barely cut down. He's a center and takes draws and is more of a playmaker so he likes a little stiffer stick, but honestly when I flex his stick it feels comfortable because it's 4-5" taller than mine.

Now what's crazy is a buddy who's 5'6 and uses 100 flex chopped down, Marty St Louis style. That stick doesn't flex or bend at all. He's a complete drive to the net and deke guy but still has a bomb of a slapper.

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08-07-2012, 12:36 AM
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He gets the "recommended" 1-2 inches of loading because he's tall enough to use the stick just barely cut down. He's a center and takes draws and is more of a playmaker so he likes a little stiffer stick, but honestly when I flex his stick it feels comfortable because it's 4-5" taller than mine.

Now what's crazy is a buddy who's 5'6 and uses 100 flex chopped down, Marty St Louis style. That stick doesn't flex or bend at all. He's a complete drive to the net and deke guy but still has a bomb of a slapper.
Yeah those dudes are nuts. I sold a 100 flex widow to a guy who couldn't be any taller than 5'6" last night. He seemed like an experienced player so I just asked him if that was the flex he wanted and he said yeah. I used my 85 flex Widow tonight and I can shoot fine with it, it's just that I don't actually feel any flex when I take my wrist/snap shots so I feel like I'm not getting the most out of it.

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08-07-2012, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Fanned On It View Post
Hey guys, I have a question about my wrist shot so I figured I'd post it in here instead of making a whole new thread for it.. Up until the other day, my wrist/snap shots were flying nice and straight and not fluttering or "wobbling" too much in the air. Well, the other day I was skating on the ice alone just practicing my shots and I noticed that I couldn't really get the puck to stay flat in the air. Obviously, the puck's velocity was suffering from this. With slap shots the puck would stay perfectly flat, saucer passes as well... but with my wrist shot, it seemed as though something changed. I was making sure that I was following through and pointing at my target, and my shots were accurate because of this but the puck was still fluttering.

Any tips/suggestions?
A bad, different or damaged tape job may have a big impact on how your shot leaves the stick. I'm usually too lazy to retape my stick often enough, and my shots will eventually go as you describe as the tape gets messed up. Then after retaping the stick I'm back to normal shots.

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08-07-2012, 08:10 PM
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A bad, different or damaged tape job may have a big impact on how your shot leaves the stick. I'm usually too lazy to retape my stick often enough, and my shots will eventually go as you describe as the tape gets messed up. Then after retaping the stick I'm back to normal shots.
Idk maybe... my tape doesn't seem too messed up. I know both of my sticks' blades are starting to crack up a little bit, so maybe that has something to do with it.

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08-07-2012, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by bholcombe View Post
A bad, different or damaged tape job may have a big impact on how your shot leaves the stick. I'm usually too lazy to retape my stick often enough, and my shots will eventually go as you describe as the tape gets messed up. Then after retaping the stick I'm back to normal shots.
Curious ... do you use stick wax or no?

Do you think it would help in keeping the tape from being hacked up?

I started to use it, and as a noob, can only tell the difference when stickhandling. My shots seem the same (not that they are good).

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08-08-2012, 12:50 AM
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Curious ... do you use stick wax or no?

Do you think it would help in keeping the tape from being hacked up?

I started to use it, and as a noob, can only tell the difference when stickhandling. My shots seem the same (not that they are good).
I feel like it helps to keep ice from building up on your blade which in turn can get your tape damp and make it easier to rip/get messed up.

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08-08-2012, 07:04 AM
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Take a heat gun or hair dryer to your blade after taping. It will set the glue and prevent a lot of rips/tears.

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08-09-2012, 10:02 AM
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the greatest skill you can learn for shooting in hockey is learning to take a proper wrist shot in stride/75%-90% full speed. Rec hockey to top teir hockey it is a huge advantage. I play in 2 winter league and one summer and i bet there is only 10-15 guys in each league that can do this effectivley and they are the ones that score alot of goals.

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08-09-2012, 10:05 AM
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Yeah those dudes are nuts. I sold a 100 flex widow to a guy who couldn't be any taller than 5'6" last night. He seemed like an experienced player so I just asked him if that was the flex he wanted and he said yeah. I used my 85 flex Widow tonight and I can shoot fine with it, it's just that I don't actually feel any flex when I take my wrist/snap shots so I feel like I'm not getting the most out of it.
could be a preference thing as well, i use 102-110flex when playing defence and 85-95 flex when playing forward. im 5'10 185. mostly because i can clap with the stiffer sticks but my wrister and quick release arent as accurate. with the lesser flex my wrist and dangles feel better but my clap suffers a bit.

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08-09-2012, 07:24 PM
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This video might help you out rayuelo. I almost exclusively use what he calls the "quick release" wristshot for the reasons you mentioned in your original post. I'm rarely at a perfect 90 degree angle to the goalie when receiving the puck and it's tough to toss that style of wristshot while in stride.
For the loading shot, you don't really shoot it in stride. If you check out how pros use it, they usually take a split second or two to go into "shooting/gliding" position. They pick a corner and use accuracy/speed to beat the goalie rather then "surprising" the goalie with a quick release.

In reality, it's more a "snap shot". the shot coming off should be a lot faster than your typical quick release (unless you're an nhl sniper). It's good to learn two ways to shoot. You either surprise the goalie or you use a bit more time to find your accuracy and power.

The snap shot is better when you're in the slot whereas the quick release is more of a rush shot in tight spaces. In a game, your shots will probably be a mix between both..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfnDT11WudQ

check the slow-mo @ 1:20.


Last edited by goonx: 08-09-2012 at 07:31 PM.
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08-09-2012, 08:12 PM
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For the loading shot, you don't really shoot it in stride. If you check out how pros use it, they usually take a split second or two to go into "shooting/gliding" position. They pick a corner and use accuracy/speed to beat the goalie rather then "surprising" the goalie with a quick release.

In reality, it's more a "snap shot". the shot coming off should be a lot faster than your typical quick release (unless you're an nhl sniper). It's good to learn two ways to shoot. You either surprise the goalie or you use a bit more time to find your accuracy and power.

The snap shot is better when you're in the slot whereas the quick release is more of a rush shot in tight spaces. In a game, your shots will probably be a mix between both..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfnDT11WudQ

check the slow-mo @ 1:20.
Everything you say makes real sense. I'm beginning to see the need for variations in technique depending on one's approach, the specific tactic you want to use with the goalie, etc.

Only thing you mentioned that I'm confused about though is the terminology ... everything else I've read says that the "snap shot" = quicker release than wrist shot.

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