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Forward to backward direction reverse... how!

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08-10-2012, 02:02 PM
  #1
mistrhanky
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Forward to backward direction reverse... how!

I have been digging around on youtube looking for a good video on how to transition between a forward skate to a backskate that changes directions 180 degrees. Not doing a mohawk and continuing in the same direction, but continuing to face forward while reversing direction. Most of the videos all want to show the same direction/pivot to backwards skating technique. I can do that one, but I need to be able to reverse my direction without turning my back on the attacker. Total newb obviously. Are there any good instructional videos anyone would recommend?

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08-10-2012, 03:00 PM
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ponder
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I'm guessing you play d? If you're skating forwards towards and attacker, and he's skating towards you with the puck, you basically have 2 options:
1) Quickly stop and start skating backwards, your first couple backwards strides should be backwards crossovers, that's the quickest way to accelerate backwards from a stop. It doesn't need to be a full stop, it can be a sort of partial stop/turn that leads immediately into a backwards crossover
2) Just keep skating forwards, and try to aggressively strip the puck from the attacker

Honestly, neither are great options if an attacker is bearing down on you under full control of the puck. Changing directions means you lose too much time/speed, and stripping him straight up will be tough if he's a good player. Just try to avoid this situation, you should only be aggressively skating forwards to get the puck if you're pretty sure you can get it, otherwise you should be playing safe, positional hockey.


Last edited by ponder: 08-10-2012 at 03:15 PM.
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08-10-2012, 03:05 PM
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ponder
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This video basically shows how to quickly accelerate backwards out of a stop.



You need to be a strong backwards skater, with strong backwards crossovers. Even if you are a strong skater, you're going to need a significant amount of space to get up to speed, if the attacker is close to you it's still too slow, he'll just blow by you.

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08-10-2012, 03:58 PM
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mistrhanky
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I did find this video which basically shows what I am trying to do, I just really don't understand the mechanics of it I guess. I just end up doing a hockey stop instead of maintaining momentum and getting moving backwards.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5q2H0EPyCD4

In fact, it is just this drill that my coach was working with us on, and of course, I was struggling mightily with. I am still learning it all(age 43, 5 months on skates, hockey classes with scrimmages, etc). I work at defenseman or center usually, as I am trying to figure out where I feel most comfortable. The skills use is obvious at defenseman, but I even find myself needing it more at center I think. There are times I move down with an attack and need to quickly pull up in front of the crease and back off into a position to handle a rebound or deflection. I end up doing option #1 that you mentioned earlier(like a dog chasing his tail) or a total stop and then shuffling around to move back. This is way too slow though and I end up being out of position/late to where I want to be.

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08-10-2012, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistrhanky View Post
I have been digging around on youtube looking for a good video on how to transition between a forward skate to a backskate that changes directions 180 degrees. Not doing a mohawk and continuing in the same direction, but continuing to face forward while reversing direction. Most of the videos all want to show the same direction/pivot to backwards skating technique. I can do that one, but I need to be able to reverse my direction without turning my back on the attacker. Total newb obviously. Are there any good instructional videos anyone would recommend?
your question is a bit unclear, can you clarify. What do you mean by turning your back to the attacker?

Ideally you should already be facing the attacker when he's attacking (pivot at the opposition blue line/centre ice red line). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rpf6p99vmU0

If he's going to get past you, you're going to have to pivot and chase him down while skating forwards. There's no other way to turn without switching your body position.

Perhaps you can only pivot turn one way? You can pivot turn facing your opponent if you can pivot turn both right and left.

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08-10-2012, 04:03 PM
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Assuming you can do a full hockey stop as well as backwards crossovers: combine the two.

While skating forward do a hockey stop motion where you get your feet facing perpendicular from your body. You don't want to actually stop dead but instead you're letting your blades grip the ice in the sideways position. Once you have that grip you can lean back towards your heels and go right into a backwards crossover which will send you backwards quite fast.

When you're ready to go into the backwards crossover you'll do a good push with the outside foot and then a big strong push with the inside skate to get you going. Once you get that one big push out of the way you can go at whatever speed you like with the crossovers.

Here's a video that kinda shows how it's done. I couldn't find any kind of tutorial sadly.



Edit:

Found a couple tutorials





Last edited by kr580: 08-10-2012 at 04:10 PM.
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08-10-2012, 04:05 PM
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It's called pivoting... try looking videos of that up. It's something taught at a fairly young age but can be difficult if you're not comfortable on your skates.

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08-10-2012, 04:15 PM
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goonx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistrhanky View Post
I did find this video which basically shows what I am trying to do, I just really don't understand the mechanics of it I guess. I just end up doing a hockey stop instead of maintaining momentum and getting moving backwards.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5q2H0EPyCD4

In fact, it is just this drill that my coach was working with us on, and of course, I was struggling mightily with. I am still learning it all(age 43, 5 months on skates, hockey classes with scrimmages, etc). I work at defenseman or center usually, as I am trying to figure out where I feel most comfortable. The skills use is obvious at defenseman, but I even find myself needing it more at center I think. There are times I move down with an attack and need to quickly pull up in front of the crease and back off into a position to handle a rebound or deflection. I end up doing option #1 that you mentioned earlier(like a dog chasing his tail) or a total stop and then shuffling around to move back. This is way too slow though and I end up being out of position/late to where I want to be.
It takes a lot of practice. It's a transition between a hockey stop and cross-over. Do those separately and slowly you'll be able to transition. It's all about edge control for this skill. you need to push with your outside foot (inside edge) into a backward cross over while you're stopping.

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08-10-2012, 04:25 PM
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Wilch
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You have to pivot. I'm sure you misunderstood the term because pivoting is what exactly you want to do if you're to change your direction without turning your back to your opponent.

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08-10-2012, 05:12 PM
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Some tips from my beginner-not-too-long-ago perspective who can still remember learning the basics:

The hockey stop part, while legit, can be a bit misleading/confusing.

What you need to be able to do is quickly reverse the direction of your skates and then complete the turn which will set you going backwards. The "hockey stop" part mimics the movement that your skates need to make but anyone who pivots well isn't stopping at all but aggressively riding their edges to make the turn.

Keep it simple. Do not aim for an apex/cone. Do not, at first, try to do a tight turn. Just focus on getting your skates to turn the right way. Until you get the feel of it down, just go for a wide turn, as wide as you need without a hockey stop until you get comfortable. Then start to tighten it up by leaning into your edges to make your turn tighter and tighter.

And don't (over)THINK about backwards cross(unders) if you can't already do them. Put them out of your mind. Once you get the hang of the initial phase of the pivot and start tightening up your arc, you'll probably start doing a cross(under) as a matter of keeping your balance. As your turn becomes tighter, it will probably feel unnatural to NOT do a cross(under) and it will just happen.

It's funny, I was able to do pivots with cross(unders) long before I felt comfortable skating backwards in a circle for a prolonged period of time with crossovers. A BIG help to me was an instructor calling backwards crossovers "cross(unders)" because it's your back foot powering under your front foot. It was a total light bulb moment for me which is why I've been using that term.

Hope this helps.

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08-10-2012, 06:36 PM
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How comfortable are you with your two foot hockey stop?

The reason I ask is the way I learned how to do that pivot (as an adult) was working my way through it, first starting out by doing a hockey stop and allowing my lower body to keep turning through into the pivot. Over time with more & more reps building confidence and balance with the movement, my body figured out what it was doing so it spent less & less time stopping and more momentum carried through the pivot. Eventually you'll get to a point where you won't do any stopping, your feet will just hop into the right angle.

Important point, pick a spot on the boards/wall ahead of you to keep your eyes focused on. Don't look down at the ice or at your feet. Keeping your eyes & head up helps maintain your balance.

Also, keep your knees bent and hips low so you have better balance.

Don't worry about crossovers/unders.

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08-10-2012, 08:26 PM
  #12
beth
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Say you're pivoting around a cone. The biggest mistake that my kids make when practicing these is that they go around the cone too far first and then try to make that pivot on the opposite side. But you want to start your pivot just as you're coming up to the cone and swing your butt towards it. Then let your butt's momentum carry you around it. Bend your knees.

Also, you can start off by pivoting on the circles, like in the Russian circles drill where you go around all the circles always facing the same side of the rink. Once you have those transitions down, just make the arc where you pivot narrower and narrower until its basically just up and back.

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08-10-2012, 11:37 PM
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mistrhanky
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Thanks for all of the advice folks. I definitely cannot do backwards crossovers yet though I can skate backward with marginal skill. As with most things skating related, I do think that nice I get the feeling of it once or twice it will click for me. This gives me a starting point to work with. I have never played a game that had so many different levels of technique and skill to master just to move properly, let alone all of the stick work and such. Those 7 year olds make it all look so easy

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08-11-2012, 01:34 AM
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hockeyisforeveryone
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I agree the ability to pivot is just as valuable to forwards. I see forwards pivot and wheel around to get open or escape with the puck a lot. It's a basic and necessary skating technique for all hockey players.

OP all the skating skills will become second nature over time. You won't think about your skating or need a ton of instruction because there's natural limitations to what you can do in skates. Those 7 year olds have been playing for 2 or 3 years, it really gets fun after 15 years. You need to catch up quickly. Get to open skates or to the pond as much as you can. In 2 years I've watched some older beginners make MASSIVE developments at sticks and pucks. A couple of them take their lunch break at the rink 5 days a week! Trust me it pays off in gold.

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08-13-2012, 07:33 AM
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While I use the same pivot technique in icehockey as described above, it does not work on rollers, so I kinda learned an outside edge mohawk turn from forward to backwards skating, to be able to face the attack at all times. Kinda like the figure skaters:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2Uy3ogtM2U

The only difference is of course is that I turn much sharper. Full desciption to the right: I go in an aggressive turn to the right, left inside edge and right outside edge. As I turn I keep my right edge on the ice and turn to the outside (facing the attacking forwards), kinda jumping to my left outside edge which is now sliding backwards. Then the same fast backwards crossovers to accelerate as above.

It's not as stable as the hockey stop slide pivot, but it is a very fast turn since you are not sliding sideways on your edges. I sometimes catch myself doing it on the ice too.

Just another skill to learn.

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08-13-2012, 09:49 AM
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mistrhanky
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I will try that too. Did a little work on it this weekend, but mostly I just ended up flat on my back in a serious hurry. Some things, can only be practiced with full gear it seems. I feel 99% certain my fundamental problem is not getting low enough with my knees. It always seems to start with the knees.

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08-14-2012, 07:48 AM
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tarheelhockey
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When in doubt, bend your knees a little more.

In this case, being a little lower to the ice will really help your balance and control while your blades are changing direction.

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08-14-2012, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheelhockey View Post
When in doubt, bend your knees a little more.
So true.

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08-14-2012, 12:53 PM
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Jarick
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For this I just go into a stop but instead of stopping fully, I push my weight onto my outside foot, dig in the edge, and use that momentum to push backwards. It's actually a really fun drill to practice, doing figure 8's.

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08-18-2012, 02:43 AM
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I haven't really thought about this in depth much in a very long time, but when i start thinking about it...i think there's actually 3 different techniques i use, depending on the situation.

Sometimes it's maybe a bit like a hockey stop transitioning to backwards crossovers. Other times it's more like a tight turn with a transition to backwards crossovers in the middle of the arc. And occasionally, it's more of a one-legged thing turning in, planting the outside leg, and transitioning to backwards crossovers. They're all a bit different though.

The biggest things i can think of as advice, are that it's important to be comfortable shifting your weight around, and that you'll probably want to be pretty comfortable just skating backwards before you delve too far into the transitions.

Best drills i can think of to practice it, are the figure8 that i'm sure you've done at some point - but always face one direction. Don't let yourself get past the hashmarks facing the wrong direction. Once you get more comfortable with the transitions, step it up - just drop your gloves on the ice and do tiny little figure-8s around them, always facing the same direction, try different transitions, combine it with edge drills. So much of it is just being comfortable on your skates and edges in a moment of (potential) panic.

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