HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > NHL Western Conference > Pacific Division > Vancouver Canucks
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

OT: Your Vancouver neighbourhood/area

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old
08-22-2012, 04:48 PM
  #101
Verviticus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6,939
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigcaulks View Post
Like I said, a good word.
i, too, hate poor people. i also (like you) wish they would just crawl somewhere and die, out of sight, cleaned up by my servants so i don't have to experience them.

you make good points!

Verviticus is online now  
Old
08-22-2012, 04:50 PM
  #102
craigcaulks*
Registered Luser.
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: East Van!
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,000
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verviticus View Post
i, too, hate poor people. i also (like you) wish they would just crawl somewhere and die, out of sight, cleaned up by my servants so i don't have to experience them.

you make good points!
I guess you could read the entire conversation.

craigcaulks* is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 04:51 PM
  #103
Verviticus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6,939
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigcaulks View Post
I guess you could read the entire conversation.
it's always been a 'good' word, though. poor people are the enemy!

Verviticus is online now  
Old
08-22-2012, 04:56 PM
  #104
canada1824
Registered User
 
canada1824's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Washington DC
Country: United States
Posts: 719
vCash: 500
Send a message via Skype™ to canada1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Swartzwelder View Post
I went to vancouver downtown today, just for an hour. I saw so many hipsters, much too high hipster saturation.

Not impressed!

I'd say it's even higher than victoria's saturation!!!!!!!!!!!!
my friends call me hipster so i guess i could reply to this:

vancouver isn't full of hipsters, vancouver is full of people who dress oddly.

canada1824 is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 05:06 PM
  #105
dave babych returns
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 4,500
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verviticus View Post
it's always been a 'good' word, though. poor people are the enemy!

dave babych returns is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 05:18 PM
  #106
Auger
Registered User
 
Auger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,936
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty Straka View Post
Random question... before I move out to Vancouver or the surrounding area I'd like to try and lign up some interviews/jobs.. Do you think being fully Bilingual gives me a leg up on others? Are their positions out there looking for Bilingual individuals like myself? How open do you think people would be to contacting me if im still in ottawa for an interview? Are phone interviews even used anymore? lol It's really weird looking for a job after being in a student position for almost 4 years at CRA here but now that im graduating it's time to look for greener pastures.
Back when I was still an undergrad I use to help manage the UBC career webpage (probably the best resource for finding a job for recent grads, but you have to be a UBC student). I wouldn't mind giving you some of the listings, if you told me what you were interested in. IMO being bilingual helps, but it's the wrong language in this part of the world. If you spoke Mandarin as well it would be helpful, but unless you're looking to be a French tutor, I don't know if it'll be such a definitive advantage. There are of course positions that I've seen, but they are quite rare.

Im sure you can request a phone interview, but for many of the better jobs, the career oriented ones at least, they have formal in person interviews. All in all, im sure you can find a job here, it's not that difficult if you look in the right places.

Auger is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 05:49 PM
  #107
Dado
Guest
 
Country:
Posts: n/a
vCash:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty Straka View Post
Do you think being fully Bilingual gives me a leg up on others?
Absolutely, yes, if you can speak Chinese as well as English, without question you have a leg up.

 
Old
08-22-2012, 06:09 PM
  #108
craigcaulks*
Registered Luser.
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: East Van!
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,000
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dado View Post
Absolutely, yes, if you can speak Chinese as well as English, without question you have a leg up.
Or just a couple of dialects of Chinese, sans English.

craigcaulks* is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 07:08 PM
  #109
LeftCoast
Registered User
 
LeftCoast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,006
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziploc View Post
Gentrification is a good or bad word depending on where your stand. If you are the person doing the gentrifying, or if your property values are skyrocketing, of course you like it. If you are getting priced out of a community that you have lived in for decades, and told that you have no real stake in the community, maybe not so much.
The problem is not that poor people make bad neighbours. The problem is that people who commit property crimes, engage in street level drug trafficing, run a grow op or bodello, or just in general trash their property and disrupt the neighbourhood, are generally poor.

Wealthy people have their own crimes, but they are generally not the type of crimes that affect their neighbours. If my neighbour is involved in fraud, embezzlement, tax evasion, etc., why would I care? But if he is running a crack house, grow op, or bordello next door, I'm going to see to it that he gets lots of attention from the police.

It's not that poor people are bad, it's that the type of bad people that degrade a neighbourhood, are generally poor. Gentrification pushes the poor out, and the bad with them.

So yes, from a home owners perspective, gentrification is a good thing.

LeftCoast is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 07:19 PM
  #110
Reverend Mayhem
I would be awesomer.
 
Reverend Mayhem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Port Coquitlam, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 20,812
vCash: 500
Send a message via Skype™ to Reverend Mayhem
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Canucklehead View Post
Depends on the field you're looking to go into. If you're in any kind of position that involves dealing with clients/customers, then yes, being multi-lingual is a big, big asset.
Especially if it's Chinese or Japanese. Although if you are dealing on a national and not an international level, pick French.

Reverend Mayhem is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 07:26 PM
  #111
ziploc
Registered User
 
ziploc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,496
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftCoast View Post
The problem is not that poor people make bad neighbours. The problem is that people who commit property crimes, engage in street level drug trafficing, run a grow op or bodello, or just in general trash their property and disrupt the neighbourhood, are generally poor.

Wealthy people have their own crimes, but they are generally not the type of crimes that affect their neighbours. If my neighbour is involved in fraud, embezzlement, tax evasion, etc., why would I care? But if he is running a crack house, grow op, or bordello next door, I'm going to see to it that he gets lots of attention from the police.

It's not that poor people are bad, it's that the type of bad people that degrade a neighbourhood, are generally poor. Gentrification pushes the poor out, and the bad with them.

So yes, from a home owners perspective, gentrification is a good thing.

"Sure, not all poor people are bad, but most bad people (bad people that are noticeably inconvenient to me anyways), tend to be poor, so it is good for poor people to be moved on."

Wow. Yeah, I understand that from a strictly property values point of view gentrification is certainly good financially, if you already own and can afford the property taxes. But that is not the only value that matters. It is that kind of selfish attitude that wrecks civic culture.

I love my neighbourhood because the people add great value to it. Most of those people are poor. Most of those people are friendly and will share and will talk to you and have lived in the neighbourhood for a long time. All of that brings incredible value to a neighbourhood. But it is hard to add that value to a bottom line, and hard to account for that value in a hyper-individualistic, profit-driven culture. And we can say, well that's just the way it is, and it works for me, but that only flies so long as you have secure work and housing. You would think differently if you were the person being pushed out, and we should be able to think differently even if we're not currently in that position.

Besides, white collar crime certainly costs tax payers (neighbours) more money than that grow-op down the block. But it's not noticeable, because the perpetrators aren't poor, and don't keep down property values.

ziploc is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 07:57 PM
  #112
RobertKron
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 8,657
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by canada1824 View Post
my friends call me hipster so i guess i could reply to this:

vancouver isn't full of hipsters, vancouver is full of people who dress oddly.
Can anyone actually come up with a definition of a hipster? I see so many people with no subcultures in common labelled as hipsters. It's bizarre. My best attempt would be "someone engaging in youth culture that I'm not familiar with, which upsets me as I do not want to realize that youth might be passing me by."

RobertKron is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 07:58 PM
  #113
Verviticus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6,939
vCash: 50
^^^ what the ****

Quote:
Originally Posted by canada1824 View Post
my friends call me hipster so i guess i could reply to this:

vancouver isn't full of hipsters, vancouver is full of people who dress oddly.
what exactly is a hipster and why is it bad

but most importantly, what is a hipster

Verviticus is online now  
Old
08-22-2012, 07:58 PM
  #114
RobertKron
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 8,657
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftCoast View Post
The problem is not that poor people make bad neighbours. The problem is that people who commit property crimes, engage in street level drug trafficing, run a grow op or bodello, or just in general trash their property and disrupt the neighbourhood, are generally poor.

Wealthy people have their own crimes, but they are generally not the type of crimes that affect their neighbours. If my neighbour is involved in fraud, embezzlement, tax evasion, etc., why would I care? But if he is running a crack house, grow op, or bordello next door, I'm going to see to it that he gets lots of attention from the police.

It's not that poor people are bad, it's that the type of bad people that degrade a neighbourhood, are generally poor. Gentrification pushes the poor out, and the bad with them.

So yes, from a home owners perspective, gentrification is a good thing.
...assuming said home owner considers ther home primarily as an investment rather than a home within a community. Which is problematic in its own right.

RobertKron is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 08:00 PM
  #115
RobertKron
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 8,657
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verviticus View Post
^^^ what the ****



what exactly is a hipster and why is it bad

but most importantly, what is a hipster
The next time someone who wore their ****ing pants backwards as a teenager tries to complain about "hipsters" I'm going to ****ing scream.

RobertKron is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 08:11 PM
  #116
LeftCoast
Registered User
 
LeftCoast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,006
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziploc View Post
"Sure, not all poor people are bad, but most bad people (bad people that are noticeably inconvenient to me anyways), tend to be poor, so it is good for poor people to be moved on."

Wow. Yeah, I understand that from a strictly property values point of view gentrification is certainly good financially, if you already own and can afford the property taxes. But that is not the only value that matters. It is that kind of selfish attitude that wrecks civic culture.

I love my neighbourhood because the people add great value to it. Most of those people are poor. Most of those people are friendly and will share and will talk to you and have lived in the neighbourhood for a long time. All of that brings incredible value to a neighbourhood. But it is hard to add that value to a bottom line, and hard to account for that value in a hyper-individualistic, profit-driven culture. And we can say, well that's just the way it is, and it works for me, but that only flies so long as you have secure work and housing. You would think differently if you were the person being pushed out, and we should be able to think differently even if we're not currently in that position.

Besides, white collar crime certainly costs tax payers (neighbours) more money than that grow-op down the block. But it's not noticeable, because the perpetrators aren't poor, and don't keep down property values.
There's very little "community" when people live behind iron gates and are afraid to walk the streets. There's very little community pride when the buildings are all tagged, the streets strewn with trash and you can't walk three blocks without being propositioned for sex or drugs. When you have to sweep the park for needles, you can't really enjoy taking your kids there.

Look at Yale Town 20 years ago versus today. Unless you made your living polishing a brass pole with your thighs, you would never want to live or work in the old Yale Town. The old Yale Town was indistinguishable from the Downtown East Side. It was affordable, but most of the housing was SRO. The new Yale town is vibrant, but expensive. Choose your poison.

It's not gentrification that drives the working poor and families out of neighbourhoods, its crime. Poor neighbourhoods still have economic value. I know this because I'm also a landlord. It's quite possible to make a business, as a land owner, providing affordable housing to the working poor. Crime however drives out good tenants and destroys the property and property value. At a certain point, the only solution is to redevelop and with the cost of new construction, nobody is building new housing for the poor.

If you want to know who to blame for that, look no further than the City and Province. It's easier to deliver services to people who need it - low socio-economic status if they are concentrated in one area. They argue that you provide the services where the population is, but Iargue that the services define the population. Rather than buying up all of the SRO hotels on the DTES (and maintaining them as SRO rooms), BC Building Corp should be developing integrated coop and market housing in East Vancouver, Richmond and Burnaby where the residents are further from the pushers, hookers and street crime and their children have a chance to grow up without being lured into these vices.

But instead we put coop housing in the Athlete's Village so the poor can have water front property and mountain views.

And white collar crime does NOT cost the neighbourhood more. The cost of white collar crime is born by all taxpayers. Property crime is very local.

LeftCoast is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 08:15 PM
  #117
RobertKron
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 8,657
vCash: 500
Nice example. Yaletown is probably the crappiest neighborhood in the city. It feels like someone opened their "neighborhood in a box" and plunked it down. You could not pay me to live in yaletown.

RobertKron is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 08:33 PM
  #118
ziploc
Registered User
 
ziploc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,496
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftCoast View Post
There's very little "community" when people live behind iron gates and are afraid to walk the streets. There's very little community pride when the buildings are all tagged, the streets strewn with trash and you can't walk three blocks without being propositioned for sex or drugs. When you have to sweep the park for needles, you can't really enjoy taking your kids there.

Look at Yale Town 20 years ago versus today. Unless you made your living polishing a brass pole with your thighs, you would never want to live or work in the old Yale Town. The old Yale Town was indistinguishable from the Downtown East Side. It was affordable, but most of the housing was SRO. The new Yale town is vibrant, but expensive. Choose your poison.

It's not gentrification that drives the working poor and families out of neighbourhoods, its crime. Poor neighbourhoods still have economic value. I know this because I'm also a landlord. It's quite possible to make a business, as a land owner, providing affordable housing to the working poor. Crime however drives out good tenants and destroys the property and property value. At a certain point, the only solution is to redevelop and with the cost of new construction, nobody is building new housing for the poor.

If you want to know who to blame for that, look no further than the City and Province. It's easier to deliver services to people who need it - low socio-economic status if they are concentrated in one area. They argue that you provide the services where the population is, but Iargue that the services define the population. Rather than buying up all of the SRO hotels on the DTES (and maintaining them as SRO rooms), BC Building Corp should be developing integrated coop and market housing in East Vancouver, Richmond and Burnaby where the residents are further from the pushers, hookers and street crime and their children have a chance to grow up without being lured into these vices.

But instead we put coop housing in the Athlete's Village so the poor can have water front property and mountain views.

And white collar crime does NOT cost the neighbourhood more. The cost of white collar crime is born by all taxpayers. Property crime is very local.
I live in the DTES now and would not move my family to Yaletown. The DTES is a far more vibrant and family friendly neighbourhood. And you're just not right about why people move, or at least not fully right. People move from the DTES because they can no longer afford to live there, because of gentrification. And you're very wrong about community pride. There is way more of it in the DTES than any other neighbourhood I've ever been a part of.

The DTES has been working class and poor for a long time, long before services came in. I agree that simply a concentration of services and sub-standard housing is far from a good thing, but it is possible to do mixed and blended housing in a way that gives dignity to people, and allows them to continue to live where they have already lived, where they have invested their lives, and doesn't price them out because the new owners don't like the look of poor people and want a 40th upscale coffee shop on their block.

Nobody was buying in Athlete's Village. The whole thing was a total mess. But it is beginning to seem as if you have a serious bias against the poor. Why would you object to poor families having a nice view? Should they only be allowed to look at back of factories?

It's fascinating. The rhetoric used to be: "Keep all the poor people in the DTES where they belong."

Now the rhetoric is: "Why should the poor people get to live in the DTES, which is a prime development area?"

And most people are only thinking about what makes them money, not what makes a good community. The residents of the DTES have done more work on thinking about and trying to enact what it means to be a good community than most places. They've done asset-based development plans, gathered huge public participation and support, outlined their desires, and are regularly advocating for the interests of all in the neighbourhood, particularly the most vulnerable. But again, none of that shows up on the bottom line, so I guess it should be ignored, and the poor should be once again relegated to "community-spoiling nuisances".

ziploc is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 08:38 PM
  #119
ziploc
Registered User
 
ziploc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,496
vCash: 50
But this is potentially getting political and stuff, and I'm not always certain where the line is drawn in threads like this. Sorry if I have crossed it. I'll stick to talking about why I like my neighbourhood from here on in.

ziploc is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 08:39 PM
  #120
Wilch
Unregistered User
 
Wilch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under your bed
Country: Taiwan
Posts: 10,243
vCash: 50
Being able to speak Chinese Mandarin and English will give you a big advantage in Vancouver. This place is flooded with Chinese immigrants.

(OT) Of course, dealing with them is an entirely different story. I speak, read and write Chinese fluently and I find them difficult to interact with at times due to a significant cultural gap.

Wilch is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 09:06 PM
  #121
trytobe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 407
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
Richmond.

Price: Inflated real estate prices because Richmond is Chinese immigrants top destination. Watching the non-Chinese folks in my block move out one after another, relocating in White Rock, Langley, Cloverdale, Coquitlam, etc. Housing price here more than doubled around where I live for the last decade. 5/10

Traffic: Sucks. I can crawl faster on No.3 Road from Granville to Cambie than driving.

Character: Sucks. People don't care about each other. No hellos. No nods. Hell, if your neighbour hears your home alarm going ******* they'd just ignore it and won't bother calling the cops even if they see that your house is getting robbed. Last time I went to McDonald's at Blundell Center, I saw some Chinese lady bargaining for a cheaper price with the staff like it's a bazaar. 0.5/10

Food: Decent. High restaurant density around No.3 and Alexandra. Lacking in proper western food. Has great Asian food. 8/10

Safety: 9/10. Asian people like staying home, watching TV or playing video games. Not much going on here. Anything serious goes down there's only 3 escape routes, Arthur Laing, Route 91 and Blaine.
Transit: Meh.

Amenities: Not too bad. 3 ice rinks, plenty of outdoor basketball courts, parks, the dike, the wharf, temples, churches, etc. 9/10.

Diamond in the rough: RIC's M-F 9AM-3PM $5 stick and puck sessions.

Gets an 8/10 overall if you don't care about interacting with your neighbours and strangers and/or already own a piece of real estate here.
Maybe "asian people" will warm up to you if you weren't so set on hating them from the outset. We love going out to eat, drink, and sing karaoke. I was fortunate enough to get rid of my asian accent after I immigrated here but speaking from experience, it's really daunting to approach people and strike up a conversation when you have an accent because we know that there are people like you judging us as soon as we open our mouths (quoting you: "You wan bowl of beeef rice? Faaive dalla").

I also think that Asian people in general are more likely to have a solid, longstanding group of close friends as opposed to a wide, loose network of friends. this combined with the cultural barriers can make it tough to become friends with an asian individual, but it's certainly not because we "dont care about each other." we're just more reserved in public.

TL;DR stop being a racist and understand that there is more to people than your first spot judgment of them.

trytobe is offline  
Old
08-22-2012, 09:21 PM
  #122
buddahsmoka1
Registered User
 
buddahsmoka1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: México, D.F.
Country: Mexico
Posts: 24,996
vCash: 500
This thread got ugly, wow.

buddahsmoka1 is online now  
Old
08-22-2012, 09:26 PM
  #123
Mr. Canucklehead
Mod Supervisor
The Modfather
 
Mr. Canucklehead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Kitimat, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 25,170
vCash: 50
I think this thread has run its course.

Closed.

Mr. Canucklehead is offline  
Closed Thread

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:26 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2015 All Rights Reserved.