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Improving speed

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Old
09-08-2012, 01:56 AM
  #1
IHaveNoCreativity
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Improving speed

Hi guys,

For a hockey player im above average in speed...

But everyone I play with is faster than me...

I want to improve my speed, but I'm looking to build muscle on my arms and my shoulders...

I was told that jogging/running is counter productive as its a method to burn fat and lose weight.


What exercise and muscles should I be doing/targeting at the gym in order to get faster, more explosive and more agile ?

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09-08-2012, 10:33 AM
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Sabre123316
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Speed and explosiveness is nice to have.

This is one area I trained at in highschool extensively however I never played hockey I played foot ball. My coach was a firm believer a quick defensive line off the snap was essential to success, and he was right. our team led the league in sacks

How we increased foot speed was a combination of drills.

High Knees, short sprints in 10 yard increments, the tire drill.

Most effective for me was the short sprints, going full out for 10 yards and stopping. resting and going again.

As for the gym increase the strength of your glutes and legs through squats, lunges, and leg presses and calf raises.

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09-08-2012, 10:38 AM
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Ozz
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Yep, jogging won't help but sprinting will. Just think about it for a second: one is low-intensity/long-term and the other is high-intensity for short bursts at a time.

Other than the obvious choices for gym exercises, pullthroughs and cleans will give you some great explosive power as well. I also really dig doing pistols, especially to follow up a nice squat routine when your legs are beaten already. The extra effort you'll have to put into the balance and strength for them (and most who are new to them probably won't be able to do any when fresh, let alone with sore/tired legs) will do wonders for your legs. If you can't do them free-standing, help balance yourself slightly with a hand on the wall. And/or pause them out until you're able to do multiple reps. As you get more use to them, shorten the rest between reps and stop balancing yourself at the wall, and eventually you'll be able to do them free-standing.

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09-08-2012, 02:22 PM
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Jogging helps speed up your recovery period between shifts.

Sprinting helps elongate your burst of energy when you accelerate and hit top speed.

Exercises such as squat that help build your leg and thigh muscles will increase your strides power and quickness.

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09-08-2012, 09:11 PM
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Assuming you have good skating technique, I would really recommend squats. I think it's done more for me in terms of skating speed than any other exercise or drill.

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09-08-2012, 11:46 PM
  #6
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Interval bike workouts. Anybody can copy, paste, print this out. (short version on bottom) 25 minutes total.

10 mins of leg stretching, do what you will, but make it last 10 minutes before you get on that bike, this is a hard workout for professionals and they do this type of workout when they're not playing games to simulate games. Maybe some other people who already know this will scoff and say this is beginner's knowledge but hey I'll just share what I like and know what works for me.

I do this all on manual level changes with my fingers and pay attention to the time and make sure i press enough times before the clock gets to 0 and STAND UP TO SPRINT.

10 mins leg and core stretching. <===(THIS IS EXTREMELY VITAL, THE STRETCHING OPENS UP MORE TISSUE FOR BLOOD TO CARRY OXYGEN TO AND LEADS TO BETTER RECOVERY!!!)

5 minutes WARMUP on ZERO tension, nice relaxed movement, keep the cycles fast, warm up your legs.

Once you get to 5 minutes, click up your tension to 5 and stand up!

Sprint for a full 30 seconds (1st sprint)

Rest 30 seconds while pedalling, sit down and manually change your level to zero just when your time is up. 3 seconds before you need to sprint, click that dial up to 5 again.

Sprint level 5. (2nd sprint, make sure you get to 30 seconds)

Rest 30 seconds,

Sprint level 5, (3rd sprint, 25 seconds is acceptable)

Rest 30 seconds,

Sprint level 5 (4th sprint, try to get to 25 seconds)

Rest 30 seconds,

Sprint level 5, (5th sprint, you get a 5 minute rest after this one, so try for 30 seconds!)

5 minute rest at level 3 (yes, 3, not 0) sitting down.

You will do the sprints 5 more times after this resting period but the levels will increase and decrease for maximum power and speed increase.

Rest is over, sprint FIVE, 30 seconds. (6th sprint)

Rest 30 seconds.

Sprint level SIX, TRY 30 seconds (7th sprint, will be tough but push those pedals, 25 seconds is acceptable)

Rest 30 seconds.

Sprint level SEVEN. (8th sprint, maximum energy is needed here, try to at least go for 10 seconds as hard as you can and push until you need to sit down and breathe)

Rest 45 seconds (lol)

Sprint level 5 (9th sprint, second last one!)

Rest 30 seconds.

Sprint level 5 (10th and final sprint, feel proud and try to stand up for the full 30 seconds!)

Rest 5 FULL minutes on ZERO for a cool down warmup, flush all of the lactic acid out of your legs, they will feel like jelly when you get off the bike, don't walk around too much just get down on the floor and stretch those legs.

Stretch for 10 minutes again. <===(DO I HAVE TO TELL YOU AGAIN WHY THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART?!)

The whole short copy and paste version of the workout goes like this:

5 MINUTES WARMUP 0

30 secs sprint 5
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 5
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 5
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 5
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 5

5 MINUTES REST 3

30 secs sprint 5
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 6
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 7
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 5
30 secs rest
30 secs sprint 5

5 MINUTES COOLDOWN 0

This isn't the actual professional level workout, it's a dialled down version that is attainable in a short amount of time for the average player trying to get into shape. They do much higher intensity levels at the NHL level. The workout above is probably fit for an AAA player trying to make the jump to the CHL I suppose, or I could be way off, if an expert could clue me in, awesome.

For beginners aspiring to reach the next level, they should try to accomplish this workout in it's entirety, but to begin with, do 6 straight sprints and then a cool down. Increase the workout to 7 sprints, and when you're comfortable doing 8 sprints, incorporate the 5 minute rest.


Last edited by Happy Fan: 09-09-2012 at 12:38 AM.
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Old
09-09-2012, 02:36 AM
  #7
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Quick thoughts: There are three things you need to worry about: foot speed, strength, and explosiveness. And you also need to keep in mind that this is skating, not running. Different muscle groups.

Foot speed: you need to make your feet move quickly to fit more strokes in while skating, obviously. The way to build this up is to find ways of making your feet move really fast, it doesn't take anything terribly complex. Run up and down steps, taking every one. It makes your feet move really quickly. And have a hand on the rail for safety, if you hit a step wrong, you'll want something to grab. Those stepper things could work too, but they've always seemed a bit jazzercizy to me. Doing those while carrying weights a la a squat could be useful though.

Explosiveness: probably the best way to do it from a hockey standpoint are russian boxes, but those are specialized equipment and not really a practical option for most. Variations on squats are probably best for this- lighter weight, lots of quick reps.

Strength: Squats, obviously.


Interval bike routines are also good- get a lot of different power and quickness requirements in one routine, and biking uses a lot of the same muscle groups as skating.

But technique, technique, technique. You can always improve it, and it's the easiest way to make yourself much better. If your technique is good, even with an average body and no real effort in the gym, you will be a much better skater than most. With you saying that you're the worst on your team, I'd be willing to bet real money that your primary problem is one of technique. And on that front, I can't help you over the internet. You're gonna need to work with a coach who can see you skate and help you make the proper adjustments on the spot.

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09-09-2012, 04:17 AM
  #8
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attach weights to your legs and then run up a flight of stairs as fast as you physically can.

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09-09-2012, 06:51 AM
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I'm going to have to disagree with stretching before you warm up. Especially static stretching. Stretch after workouts, not before.

Speed is leg strength/power to weight ratio, flexibility/stride length, foot speed, anaerobic capacity, and skating technique.

Before you get into advanced hockey specific foot speed drills get yourself a good base

1) Build muscle/strength-squats, lunges, deadlifts, calf raise, hamstring curls.

2)Lose body fat if you need to- it's slowing you down

3) Get flexible- will facilitate a longer stride and prevent injury

4) Get your anaerobic(sprints) and aerobic fitness(20-45min sustained jog etc.)

Once you get your base fitness in order I would progress to foot speed drills, plyometrics, speed and agility drills, take a powerskating class.

Without being strong, flexible, and having a cardiovascular system that can adequately supply the oxygen to your muscles you'll never be fast, skating technique.

Don't underestimate fitness. Hockey is an athletic sport. The best athletes will eventually become the best players.

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09-09-2012, 07:24 AM
  #10
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And if you're going to squat, I recommend doing full squats to the floor. Olympic style. This will build a lot more power in a larger range of motion, plus it'll beef up your legs considerably if that's what you want.

I'm a bodybuilder so this is what I'm all about. Years ago I got hurt and laid off squats a while. I eventually got back into hockey after a LONG layoff, skated well but not great, and would tire in my legs easily. I can about guarantee no one in the league has stronger legs than I did, but strength alone doesn't translate 100% to skating. On the flipside, as a teen many years ago I had toothpick legs, didn't lift at all, didn't train whatsoever, but was easily one of the fastest in the leagues in which I played.

Anyway, after a year or so of playing again as an adult, now with 70 extra pounds on my frame from all the lifting, I decided to get back into doing serious squat routines. Not 2 weeks after doing so my skating had improved noticeably enough for some teammates to take notice without me bringing anything up.

Squats are definitely the king of leg exercises (as if it even needs to be said), but too many people do them incorrectly or in a way to be of detriment to both their leg and strength development. DO learn to do them correctly, and better yet as I said here make your range of motion as large as you can. Don't be that loser in the gym going down 4" with crazy weight. It won't help anything except your core from holding the weight up. There's some benefit to that as far as core strengthening goes, and even from a powerlifting perspective the mental drive of holding lots of extra weight into squat position (then racking it) helps your "true" squat weight feel lighter. Not that you'll find many (if any) people in a normal gym with a mindset like that, but hey... :p

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09-09-2012, 08:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
I'm going to have to disagree with stretching before you warm up. Especially static stretching. Stretch after workouts, not before.
YES, YES, YES. Do not stretch before a workout. Especially cycling, there is no point. Just add a longer warm up period.

I was a competitive cyclist for many years starting at age 16 and I'm going to have to disagree with using cycling to help develop explosiveness/speed in hockey. The bike does not work the same muscles as hockey, it is a very linear activity and really ignores the groin muscles. Personally, I've had to deal with significant muscle imbalances that have led to injury because my groin muscles and supporting muscles aren't strong enough to keep up with the power my quads can generate.

If the question is improving skating speed, squats, plyo, foot speed drills, on-ice sprinting, that's what you want to focus on first and foremost. I would also make sure your core is strong enough to support your leg power, especially transverse abs.

Not to say the bike can't help your hockey game a lot. But I would look at it from the cardio side. Personally, I focus on longer intervals, ~5min at my anaerobic threshold. This really helps keep me maintain a high effort level on the ice and avoid getting gassed on most shifts.

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09-09-2012, 05:50 PM
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When you skate, do you bend your knees and bend at the waist? I was self taught. I did receive that advice from one of the best NHL skaters, Eddie Shore, when I was twelve years old. I never took a skating lesson. Even though I was very small, 5'7" and 120 pounds, I worked the Memorial Cup and pro hockey, as a Linesman, when I was nineteen. I had a tryout with the NHL, original six, when I was twenty-one, all because of my skating speed. You not only get good speed, you also have better balance.

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09-09-2012, 06:49 PM
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I was watching the Canada-Russia tournie this past month and was struck with how low the players bent their knees. Man, they get low. Not sure why it strikes me more so with juniors than the pros...

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09-10-2012, 01:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank4Hart View Post
attach weights to your legs and then run up a flight of stairs as fast as you physically can.
Great way to strain your back and sit out for 3 weeks

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09-10-2012, 05:08 AM
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And if you're going to squat, I recommend doing full squats to the floor. Olympic style. This will build a lot more power in a larger range of motion, plus it'll beef up your legs considerably if that's what you want.

I'm a bodybuilder so this is what I'm all about. Years ago I got hurt and laid off squats a while. I eventually got back into hockey after a LONG layoff, skated well but not great, and would tire in my legs easily. I can about guarantee no one in the league has stronger legs than I did, but strength alone doesn't translate 100% to skating. On the flipside, as a teen many years ago I had toothpick legs, didn't lift at all, didn't train whatsoever, but was easily one of the fastest in the leagues in which I played.

Anyway, after a year or so of playing again as an adult, now with 70 extra pounds on my frame from all the lifting, I decided to get back into doing serious squat routines. Not 2 weeks after doing so my skating had improved noticeably enough for some teammates to take notice without me bringing anything up.

Squats are definitely the king of leg exercises (as if it even needs to be said), but too many people do them incorrectly or in a way to be of detriment to both their leg and strength development. DO learn to do them correctly, and better yet as I said here make your range of motion as large as you can. Don't be that loser in the gym going down 4" with crazy weight. It won't help anything except your core from holding the weight up. There's some benefit to that as far as core strengthening goes, and even from a powerlifting perspective the mental drive of holding lots of extra weight into squat position (then racking it) helps your "true" squat weight feel lighter. Not that you'll find many (if any) people in a normal gym with a mindset like that, but hey... :p
Those that can go all the way down, more power to them. I go to parallel and that has worked well for me. Old back and knee injuries remind me that's as far as they like to go.

The other thing is watch nhl players skating. Even the ones with the deepest knee bends aren't going past 90 degrees of flexion in their knees. If some are it's very slightly past 90.

A big reason you were faster years ago is the 70 lbs of bodyweight. It's relative strength(strength/body weight) that matters not absolute strength.

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09-10-2012, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
Those that can go all the way down, more power to them. I go to parallel and that has worked well for me. Old back and knee injuries remind me that's as far as they like to go.

The other thing is watch nhl players skating. Even the ones with the deepest knee bends aren't going past 90 degrees of flexion in their knees. If some are it's very slightly past 90.

A big reason you were faster years ago is the 70 lbs of bodyweight. It's relative strength(strength/body weight) that matters not absolute strength.


I never would have thought.

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09-10-2012, 10:12 AM
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A big reason you were faster years ago is the 70 lbs of bodyweight. It's relative strength(strength/body weight) that matters not absolute strength.
Small plug here: I recently lost 30 pounds, 20 of it in the first 2 months, by following the 4 Hour Body diet. I went from 174 to 144 and my energy level remained high throughout. This was important to me because I play sports 4 times a week and workout regularly. In fact, because of how great I feel, I still "follow" the diet's general structure 3 months after hitting my target.

Something to point out: I just turned 40 and have worked out very regularly for the past 4 years and weight loss has been difficult to achieve and maintain.

144 might sound light but that's my build. That's what I weighed 10 years ago. So it was all fat loss, I lost no muscle or strength. My stomach is completely flat without extra exercises, I just watched the fat get sucked out of my body. Again, I work out regularly, but my workouts did not change during this period so it was 100% from the diet.

And yes, my skating speed has definitely improved. Of course, I'm far easier to move out of the crease than before. But my muscles are just as strong if not stronger.

Oh, and none of my clothing fits anymore. I went from a 34 waist to 31. I actually needed to buy smaller Coreshorts.

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09-10-2012, 10:55 AM
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I'm not going to start a new thread about it so I guess I'll ask here.

I'm right around middle aged and coming off of an injury. I took about 3 months off and I just don't feel strong on the puck anymore. I know I'll have to build myself up again but I felt that slipping even before the injury. Anyone know anything that can help my strength and balance?

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09-10-2012, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IHaveNoCreativity View Post
Hi guys,

For a hockey player im above average in speed...

But everyone I play with is faster than me...

I want to improve my speed, but I'm looking to build muscle on my arms and my shoulders...
I was told that jogging/running is counter productive as its a method to burn fat and lose weight.


What exercise and muscles should I be doing/targeting at the gym in order to get faster, more explosive and more agile ?
This screams 5x5 full body program to me. I've been on one this summer & have never seen better gains. Full body focuses on compound (using multiple muscles per lift) lifting, & will increase strength/size over your entire body.

I'm on this 3x a week (I've done mostly split type routines before, I really wanted to hit it hard this summer & this is just simple explanation of my program as I've plateaued on a few of the exercises & had to reset etc):

-squat (alternate deadlift) 5x5 straight (alternate ramp)
-mp (alternate bp) 5x5 straight (alternate ramp)
-pullups to fail x3 (alternate dumbbell row)
-weighted situps ( alternate dumbbell sidebends)
-add an optional wo if you need to (ie: dumbbell side raise for lateral delts, shoulder work since you mentioned it /alternate calf raise etc)
-dumbbell forearm curls (alternate squeeze gripper)

+protein & glutamine & SLEEP!

Moderate cardio is fine on off days as long as your getting enough calories etc. to maintain muscle growth. I've been doing speed rope a few times a week, it's crazy how challenging/ intense of an exercise it is, great for timing too.


Last edited by sanityplease: 09-10-2012 at 11:44 AM.
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09-11-2012, 05:49 AM
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[/B]

I never would have thought.
I figured

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