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couple of skating questions

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09-17-2012, 05:47 AM
  #1
denace
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couple of skating questions

My friend, who is a respected hockeyplayer and coach over here, told me that because of my age (35) I will never be able to skate like players on a high level do. I have a little experience in hockey, I'm still learning the basics. Is this really true ? I'm realistic, so I know that I'll never skate like a John Tavares or something, but am I too old to skate fast with the proper technique ?

My second question is, I'm going to the gym 3 times a week to lose fat and to get in shape a little. Should I train my legs during the season ? After every workout, I'm planning to skate for at least an hour and a half and one time a week I play some pick up hockey.

During the summer, I've already lost 15 keys of fat, just by dieting, cardio and weighttraining. I've trained my legs before by squatting and doing lunges. I usually couldn't walk normally for four days ! Will this interfere with my skating ?

Thanks in advance

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09-17-2012, 07:10 AM
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TickleMeYandle
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I'm also an 'older' beginner and I don't think I'll ever skate at a high level. Simply because it takes years to get there, and that's years of dedicated practice and training. I may play hockey for the rest of my life, but since I have other things that require my attention, I won't be able to devote the hours necessary to get to that level.

That doesn't mean I can't be a good hockey player, or contribute to a team. Right now I'm D-league, maybe in a few years I'll be C-league. I'll never be as good as the higher league plays, they have a 20+ year head start on me.

Losing weight has made me faster. I still have quite a bit to go, but just losing 10-12 pounds has made a noticeable difference to my coaches and teammates. I may never be as fast as the top-level skaters, but I don't doubt that I will get much faster as I play and get lighter.

Consider your motivation for playing. At your age, is it really a goal to get into a high-level league? What will you get out of it that you can't get out of playing in a lower-level league? The teams in the D-leagues that I play for are having just as much fun as the teams in the A-leagues that I've seen. They pay the same amount in league fees, have the same number of games, get the same amount of ice time, etc. If you're enjoying yourself, does it matter what league you're in? I can understand if you're a young pup hoping to work his way into the NHL or something, but if it's just for fun, there's plenty of fun to be had in any level of play. Going into it with the goal that you'll be as good as the guys who have been playing since they were kids is going to be a lesson in frustration and disappointment.

Get better, work hard, have fun...but don't set yourself up for failure by setting goals that aren't really attainable without devoting 100% of your time and resources to meeting them.

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09-17-2012, 09:42 AM
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You can skate as much as your natural ability, practice, and instruction takes you. No you probably won't be able to skate like an NHL'er, but you should be able to get up to a respectable beer league level with a couple years of work and some coaching.

Congrats on the fat loss...that's really tough. I can't move the scale at all anymore although I used to be able to when I was younger. You should be a lot quicker on the ice. I know I was much quicker with squats and deadlifts, even though I was (and am) much fatter than my teammates who would run and bike all the time. They had the endurance but I had the speed. If you can do both, you'll be well ahead of the curve.

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09-17-2012, 10:05 AM
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Im planning to lose another 10 kilo, then I'll be satisfied I'm not aiming to play for a high level hockey league. We just started a beerleague team amongst friends. There are some high skilled players and there are some....lets say less gifted players like myself. My stickhandling is not bad at all, but my skating needs a lot of work. I was wondering if I train myself properly, will I be alble to keep up with the faster guys ? But like what Jarick said, it all depends on my natural ability.

Unfortunately my friend the well respected coach etc..is in Nigeria for 2 years Can I learn the proper tecniques with, let's say a Laura Stamm dvd with a lot of icetime or is it a must to join a skatingclass. We don't have those in my town, so I have to drive 2 hours to the nearest rink that has one..

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09-17-2012, 06:07 PM
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I'd say you probably can learn a lot but most people peak in speed / power around 21-28, so if you took all your knowledge and put it into your 25 year old body you'd be faster.

I've had a lot of guys email me saying they are 50 years old and just started playing hockey so don't think you can't do it because of your age!

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09-17-2012, 08:18 PM
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I started at 41 and I'm freakin' awesome.

You'll get out of it what you put into it. If you keep pushing yourself to improve, you'll just get better and better at least until your body starts falling apart. Don't let anybody tell you it's too late. 35 is still young! I never thought that I'd be able to do the things I can do now and I was way older than you when I started.

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09-17-2012, 09:36 PM
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JoeCool16
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Haha no, you probably won't ever get to a high level. That doesn't mean you can't become a very strong skater, especially for a beer league. When I started, a guy around your age was just starting too. 3 years later he's now a quite decent skater, while I, almost 20 years younger than him, haven't progressed as far. He's just more determined, and practices more. You can get there.

Still, you'll probably see 8 year olds skating around with more ability than you or I have, and it can be disheartening (in a funny sort of way).

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09-18-2012, 01:26 AM
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Thanks everybody ! I am determined and I have quite a lot of free time on my hands, so I'll get there eventually

Sooo....leg training during the season or not ?

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09-18-2012, 03:12 AM
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You can reach mastery in 10 years in anything if you devote time and effort. Skating is quite easy to learn, you will just have to skate and try things you can't do. I started at 36 and 3 years later I am one of the best skaters in my division (and I keep working at it). You'll be skating against other amateurs, so what's the point of your "friend"?

Sure you will not have the speed of a 25 year old NHL player, but no 35 year old has that, even if they play in the NHL.

I only train legs once in a week, and that seems to be enough. Anything more I overtrain. It will come down to your recovery speed, and that is a pretty personal factor, though at 35 you should be on the slower side.

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09-18-2012, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denace View Post
Sooo....leg training during the season or not ?
Don't fixate on leg training, focus on core strength. It's much more relevant and very important for avoiding injury.

Take my word on it, I'm dealing with it now.

And if you want to learn how to skate, find some power skating classes. It's the only way you're ever going to learn technique.

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09-18-2012, 04:51 PM
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I'm 38 and only started a few years ago and I think I skate pretty well for my level. I played roller about 14 years ago and knew crossovers and a few other things but ice was still a lot different. My suggestion is to pick a manuver that you would like to be able to do or that would serve you well in a game situation and work on it at a stick and puck time. I play defense so I really work on my backwards crossovers, pivots, and transitions.

In game situations speed is great if you know where to go and what to do. If you can fly down the ice but are never where you need to be then what good is it? Or if you can only skate fast without the puck. I've seen plenty of guys who wern't the best skaters but would still score goals because they read the play and figured out where they needed to be or managed to get to the net and knock in a rebound. I think I'm a good skater but I couldn't score a goal to save my life. That's why I play D.

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09-19-2012, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by izzy3 View Post
You can reach mastery in 10 years in anything if you devote time and effort. Skating is quite easy to learn, you will just have to skate and try things you can't do. I started at 36 and 3 years later I am one of the best skaters in my division (and I keep working at it). You'll be skating against other amateurs, so what's the point of your "friend"?

Sure you will not have the speed of a 25 year old NHL player, but no 35 year old has that, even if they play in the NHL.

I only train legs once in a week, and that seems to be enough. Anything more I overtrain. It will come down to your recovery speed, and that is a pretty personal factor, though at 35 you should be on the slower side.
Ok, thanks, I think once a week will be enough Core is also in my schedule, the weighttraining is for fatloss and general conditioning only.

My friend means well though, he just explained to me that I shouldn't focus too much on technique, but on the feeling of skating first:feeling comfy on my skates and the ice and trying to break out of that comfort zone.

Thanks everybody you've been very helpfull

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09-19-2012, 10:07 AM
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xX Hot Fuss
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My first day of Learn to play there were about 10 guys from a Beer League who showed up just for the hell of it. Most of them were 35+, some even in their mid/late 40's. Lots of them were about 35-45 lbs overweight and were skating fine. They were getting tired really fast but they were still able to do the things they wanted.

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09-29-2012, 01:13 AM
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Originally Posted by JoeCool16 View Post
Haha no, you probably won't ever get to a high level. That doesn't mean you can't become a very strong skater, especially for a beer league. When I started, a guy around your age was just starting too. 3 years later he's now a quite decent skater, while I, almost 20 years younger than him, haven't progressed as far. He's just more determined, and practices more. You can get there.

Still, you'll probably see 8 year olds skating around with more ability than you or I have, and it can be disheartening (in a funny sort of way).
I think this kinda touches on it.


It really depends on your definition of 'high level' i guess.

But at the end of the day, all of the really strong skaters i know, have been doing it since they were knee high to a grasshopper or whatever. Not trying to sound overly pretentious, but i think skating is a lot like learning a language. Kids who pick up other languages at a very young age tend to end up much more fluent in them. It all comes much more naturally to them.

Again, that's not to say that you can't pick up a language at 20, 30, 40, 50, whatever. But as much as you might devote yourself to the technical aspects of the project, it's probably never going to as natural as learning it as a youngin. There's something about learning things at that young age that just ingrains itself in a person, and it's just going to be easier for them from there on. Just like a person who learns Spanish at age 40 is probably going to have an easily identifiable accent that lingers...someone who starts skating at 40 is going to have the skating equivalent of an accent. It might be grammatically correct, but it's not going to be as fluid and natural as a native speaker/skater.

I don't mean that at all as a discouraging thing, and it's great seeing newcomers make the effort and really try to be the best they can be. It's just a realistic comment.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with not being a 'high level' skater...simply striving for that and doing everything you can to better yourself as a skater is admirable to the utmost degree.

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09-29-2012, 09:48 AM
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denace
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Originally Posted by biturbo19 View Post
I think this kinda touches on it.


It really depends on your definition of 'high level' i guess.

But at the end of the day, all of the really strong skaters i know, have been doing it since they were knee high to a grasshopper or whatever. Not trying to sound overly pretentious, but i think skating is a lot like learning a language. Kids who pick up other languages at a very young age tend to end up much more fluent in them. It all comes much more naturally to them.

Again, that's not to say that you can't pick up a language at 20, 30, 40, 50, whatever. But as much as you might devote yourself to the technical aspects of the project, it's probably never going to as natural as learning it as a youngin. There's something about learning things at that young age that just ingrains itself in a person, and it's just going to be easier for them from there on. Just like a person who learns Spanish at age 40 is probably going to have an easily identifiable accent that lingers...someone who starts skating at 40 is going to have the skating equivalent of an accent. It might be grammatically correct, but it's not going to be as fluid and natural as a native speaker/skater.

I don't mean that at all as a discouraging thing, and it's great seeing newcomers make the effort and really try to be the best they can be. It's just a realistic comment.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with not being a 'high level' skater...simply striving for that and doing everything you can to better yourself as a skater is admirable to the utmost degree.
Great answer and I think you are spot on with the analogy, thats what my friend was trying to say I think. Well put

I will be very pleased when I end up as a decent skater

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09-29-2012, 10:51 AM
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Great answer and I think you are spot on with the analogy, thats what my friend was trying to say I think. Well put

I will be very pleased when I end up as a decent skater
Having goals are good and this might sound trite, but you should just be enjoying the time on the ice, don't worry about what level you're at. I absolutely love ice skating. If not for my wonky groin, I'd skate far more often than I do now.

Having said that, one thing I remind myself during skating/hockey classes: Every drill is a chance to get better. You paid the money so don't "soft pedal" any of the drills. Focus on better form, technique, control, speed, whatever. No matter how well you can do a certain drill, you can be doing it better.

That will help speed your progression.

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09-30-2012, 09:11 AM
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TrueBlue86
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Originally Posted by denace View Post
My friend, who is a respected hockeyplayer and coach over here, told me that because of my age (35) I will never be able to skate like players on a high level do. I have a little experience in hockey, I'm still learning the basics. Is this really true ? I'm realistic, so I know that I'll never skate like a John Tavares or something, but am I too old to skate fast with the proper technique ?

My second question is, I'm going to the gym 3 times a week to lose fat and to get in shape a little. Should I train my legs during the season ? After every workout, I'm planning to skate for at least an hour and a half and one time a week I play some pick up hockey.

During the summer, I've already lost 15 keys of fat, just by dieting, cardio and weighttraining. I've trained my legs before by squatting and doing lunges. I usually couldn't walk normally for four days ! Will this interfere with my skating ?

Thanks in advance
I'm 26 but I finally got back into to the gym this summer and also started training my legs, largely inspired for my new love for playing hockey.

I lost 20 points and it's ALOT easier to move and skate!

I feel your pain with the leg workouts ahah Make sure you try to rub out the lactic acid if it hurts too much and get some good protein in. Also, you sort of have to figure out how much your legs can tolerate without crippling you for a week. It's a challenge, I know. Legs are so easy to overwork I find...

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09-30-2012, 09:52 AM
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Jarick
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Last year I started doing squats and deadlifts and my speed improved, even as I started gaining a lot of weight. So definitely keep those in the rotation, but try not to do them on game days or the day before, you'll be sore. And I think you'll want to do some stretching and warmups more than us young kids do to avoid muscle/groin injuries. I played with a guy in his 60's who had to do a lot more stretching as he got older.

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09-30-2012, 11:32 AM
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TrueBlue86
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Originally Posted by xX Hot Fuss View Post
My first day of Learn to play there were about 10 guys from a Beer League who showed up just for the hell of it. Most of them were 35+, some even in their mid/late 40's. Lots of them were about 35-45 lbs overweight and were skating fine. They were getting tired really fast but they were still able to do the things they wanted.
sure, they skated 'fine' but how much could have they been if they were in shape???

losing most of the extra fat is the single most important thing imo one can do for their heart health and general well being... not to mention how much it'll improve your athletic performance

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10-01-2012, 02:27 AM
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denace
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Having goals are good and this might sound trite, but you should just be enjoying the time on the ice, don't worry about what level you're at. I absolutely love ice skating. If not for my wonky groin, I'd skate far more often than I do now.

Having said that, one thing I remind myself during skating/hockey classes: Every drill is a chance to get better. You paid the money so don't "soft pedal" any of the drills. Focus on better form, technique, control, speed, whatever. No matter how well you can do a certain drill, you can be doing it better.

That will help speed your progression.
Yep, you're absolutly right there. The fun factor always comes first but I am a lot more focused than I used to be when I was younger. Setting goals is a great way to guide your energy and to have more succes in what you do. This improves the fun factor aswell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue86 View Post
I'm 26 but I finally got back into to the gym this summer and also started training my legs, largely inspired for my new love for playing hockey.

I lost 20 points and it's ALOT easier to move and skate!

I feel your pain with the leg workouts ahah Make sure you try to rub out the lactic acid if it hurts too much and get some good protein in. Also, you sort of have to figure out how much your legs can tolerate without crippling you for a week. It's a challenge, I know. Legs are so easy to overwork I find...
I'm aiming to be 85 kg by the end of the year. I know for a fact that legtraining is a metabolism booster. Squatting is my favorite exercise. I allways make sure I take a proteinshake before and after the workouts. I think I'll lower the weight and increase the reps tomorrow.

Thanks everybody for the help !

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