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Earthquake!!!

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Old
10-10-2012, 02:46 PM
  #126
Ollie Williams
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It felt and sounded like a really heavily loaded tractor trailer was about to slam into the side of my house.

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10-10-2012, 03:57 PM
  #127
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Sucks for you guys.

Here, in Ontario we felt nothing. Though, we had our earthquake last year.

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10-10-2012, 04:14 PM
  #128
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I don't see why people are startled by this minor earthquake. Montreal witnesses earthquakes between 3.5-5 almost every 5 years or so and lesser ones each day, 99% of them are never felt.

The Valley of the St-Lawrence river lies between two mountains chains: the Laurentians and the Appalachians which were formed years ago by volcanoes and tectonic plate convection and movements. Many ancient fault lines are too be found along the river reminiscent once of the different plates which were colliding once and producing heat. This heat melted rocks and created mountains which in form erupted, releasing magma and forming the igneous rocks of the Canadian Shield (Northern Quebec and the Laurentians mountains). These inactive fault lines can become active sometimes triggering minor tremors like the one we witnessed today after midnight. The Charlevoix region in Quebec, for example, can see earthquakes of up to 7.

The soil in the Valley was also compacted by years of glacial erosion. The land tends to lift which also causes minor tremors. Mont-Royal for example, is a volcanic intrusion caused by the uplift motion of the soil.

Montreal and the St-Lawrence Valley is the second most active seismic zone in Canada after BC. Tall Buildings in Montreal are designed to withstand earthquakes of 6-7 magnitude.

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10-10-2012, 04:23 PM
  #129
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Originally Posted by DumFries View Post
I don't see why people are startled by this minor earthquake. Montreal witnesses earthquakes between 3.5-5 almost every 5 years or so and lesser ones each day, 99% of them are never felt.

The Valley of the St-Lawrence river lies between two mountains chains: the Laurentians and the Appalachians which were formed years ago by volcanoes and tectonic plate convection and movements. Many ancient fault lines are too be found along the river reminiscent once of the different plates which were colliding once and producing heat. This heat melted rocks and created mountains which in form erupted, releasing magma and forming the igneous rocks of the Canadian Shield (Northern Quebec and the Laurentians mountains). These inactive fault lines can become active sometimes triggering minor tremors like the one we witnessed today after midnight. The Charlevoix region in Quebec, for example, can see earthquakes of up to 7.

The soil in the Valley was also compacted by years of glacial erosion. The land tends to lift which also causes minor tremors. Mont-Royal for example, is a volcanic intrusion caused by the uplift motion of the soil.

Montreal and the St-Lawrence Valley is the second most active seismic zone in Canada after BC. Tall Buildings in Montreal are designed to withstand earthquakes of 6-7 magnitude.
You're either a geologist, or whatever.
A nerd
Or you have one of those cards that tells you the history of a certain region.


It could have been caused by an under water volcano, but not likely.

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10-10-2012, 04:33 PM
  #130
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Originally Posted by DumFries View Post
I don't see why people are startled by this minor earthquake. Montreal witnesses earthquakes between 3.5-5 almost every 5 years or so and lesser ones each day, 99% of them are never felt.

The Valley of the St-Lawrence river lies between two mountains chains: the Laurentians and the Appalachians which were formed years ago by volcanoes and tectonic plate convection and movements. Many ancient fault lines are too be found along the river reminiscent once of the different plates which were colliding once and producing heat. This heat melted rocks and created mountains which in form erupted, releasing magma and forming the igneous rocks of the Canadian Shield (Northern Quebec and the Laurentians mountains). These inactive fault lines can become active sometimes triggering minor tremors like the one we witnessed today after midnight. The Charlevoix region in Quebec, for example, can see earthquakes of up to 7.

The soil in the Valley was also compacted by years of glacial erosion. The land tends to lift which also causes minor tremors. Mont-Royal for example, is a volcanic intrusion caused by the uplift motion of the soil.

Montreal and the St-Lawrence Valley is the second most active seismic zone in Canada after BC. Tall Buildings in Montreal are designed to withstand earthquakes of 6-7 magnitude.
I was under the impression that most Quebec earthquakes were the result of isostatic (or post-glacial) rebound.

And I don't think that Charlevoix has ever experienced a 7.0 magnitude earthquake. Especially not in recent memory - you'd probably have to go back hundreds of years. If they did, almost the whole province would feel it and that area would be close to devastated.

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10-10-2012, 04:34 PM
  #131
Rosso Scuderia
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Originally Posted by DumFries View Post
I don't see why people are startled by this minor earthquake. Montreal witnesses earthquakes between 3.5-5 almost every 5 years or so and lesser ones each day, 99% of them are never felt.

The Valley of the St-Lawrence river lies between two mountains chains: the Laurentians and the Appalachians which were formed years ago by volcanoes and tectonic plate convection and movements. Many ancient fault lines are too be found along the river reminiscent once of the different plates which were colliding once and producing heat. This heat melted rocks and created mountains which in form erupted, releasing magma and forming the igneous rocks of the Canadian Shield (Northern Quebec and the Laurentians mountains). These inactive fault lines can become active sometimes triggering minor tremors like the one we witnessed today after midnight. The Charlevoix region in Quebec, for example, can see earthquakes of up to 7.

The soil in the Valley was also compacted by years of glacial erosion. The land tends to lift which also causes minor tremors. Mont-Royal for example, is a volcanic intrusion caused by the uplift motion of the soil.

Montreal and the St-Lawrence Valley is the second most active seismic zone in Canada after BC. Tall Buildings in Montreal are designed to withstand earthquakes of 6-7 magnitude.
Last night earthquake was felt by 95% of the people I know living in Montreal. It even woke a couple of my friends. So not really a minor earthquake that 99% did not felt. It was actually the strongest one Ive ever felt in almost 30 years living Montreal. My house was literally shaking.

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10-10-2012, 04:39 PM
  #132
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Actually im not sure if anyone form my area has mentioned it or not (havent read the whole thread) but we actually felt it in the NCR (Ottawa and Gatineau) where I live so it must have been a decent earthquake woke up some people I know although I must have slept right through it

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10-10-2012, 04:39 PM
  #133
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Can someone provide me with a scientific explanation for why I didn't feel it? I'm scared.

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10-10-2012, 04:41 PM
  #134
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Originally Posted by Analyzer View Post
You're either a geologist, or whatever.
A nerd
Or you have one of those cards that tells you the history of a certain region.


It could have been caused by an under water volcano, but not likely.
I'm a geotechnical engineer actually. Not a nerd.

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10-10-2012, 04:45 PM
  #135
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Originally Posted by airic000 View Post
I was under the impression that most Quebec earthquakes were the result of isostatic (or post-glacial) rebound.

And I don't think that Charlevoix has ever experienced a 7.0 magnitude earthquake. Especially not in recent memory - you'd probably have to go back hundreds of years. If they did, almost the whole province would feel it and that area would be close to devastated.
There was 6 in Saguenay in 1988 and yes all the province felt it. Like I stated, earthquakes in the St-Lawrence Valley are caused by glacier rebound.

Historic Earthquakes

St. Lawrence Valley region, Quebec, Canada
1663 02 05 22:30 UTC
Magnitude 7.0

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquak...1663_02_05.php

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10-10-2012, 04:46 PM
  #136
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Originally Posted by Ollie Williams View Post
It felt and sounded like a really heavily loaded tractor trailer slammed into the side of my house.
lol yup that exactly what i described it as!

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10-10-2012, 04:58 PM
  #137
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Originally Posted by 68 View Post
Can someone provide me with a scientific explanation for why I didn't feel it? I'm scared.
'Cause you, like me, took a multi.

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10-10-2012, 05:04 PM
  #138
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Originally Posted by DumFries View Post
I'm a geotechnical engineer actually. Not a nerd.


slight need of humor dude.

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10-10-2012, 05:04 PM
  #139
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Originally Posted by DumFries View Post
There was 6 in Saguenay in 1988 and yes all the province felt it. Like I stated, earthquakes in the St-Lawrence Valley are caused by glacier rebound.

Historic Earthquakes

St. Lawrence Valley region, Quebec, Canada
1663 02 05 22:30 UTC
Magnitude 7.0

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquak...1663_02_05.php
OK cool. I remember the 1988 one because I was living in Quebec city. That was the biggest one I've ever felt. I believe it was felt all the way in NYC.

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10-10-2012, 05:35 PM
  #140
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After living in Japan for so long, I find it weird how long I've gone without feeling one since I've been back.

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10-10-2012, 06:21 PM
  #141
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Originally Posted by airic000 View Post
I was under the impression that most Quebec earthquakes were the result of isostatic (or post-glacial) rebound.

And I don't think that Charlevoix has ever experienced a 7.0 magnitude earthquake. Especially not in recent memory - you'd probably have to go back hundreds of years. If they did, almost the whole province would feel it and that area would be close to devastated.
They did in 1663.

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10-10-2012, 06:44 PM
  #142
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Originally Posted by DumFries View Post
I'm a geotechnical engineer actually. Not a nerd.
That definition translate to nerd I believe

But I'm an accountant, so who am I to say anything lol

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10-10-2012, 07:20 PM
  #143
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That definition translate to nerd I believe

But I'm an accountant, so who am I to say anything lol
If everybody was to call others nerds, then we would all be nerds.

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10-10-2012, 08:30 PM
  #144
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If everybody was to call others nerds, then we would all be nerds.
Not me.

I can't even read a picture book.

My intelligence is inferior to everyone else's, thus I'm jealous and call people nerds.

Now I'll have to leave this forum.

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10-11-2012, 12:52 AM
  #145
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Originally Posted by DumFries View Post
I don't see why people are startled by this minor earthquake. Montreal witnesses earthquakes between 3.5-5 almost every 5 years or so and lesser ones each day, 99% of them are never felt.

The Valley of the St-Lawrence river lies between two mountains chains: the Laurentians and the Appalachians which were formed years ago by volcanoes and tectonic plate convection and movements. Many ancient fault lines are too be found along the river reminiscent once of the different plates which were colliding once and producing heat. This heat melted rocks and created mountains which in form erupted, releasing magma and forming the igneous rocks of the Canadian Shield (Northern Quebec and the Laurentians mountains). These inactive fault lines can become active sometimes triggering minor tremors like the one we witnessed today after midnight. The Charlevoix region in Quebec, for example, can see earthquakes of up to 7.

The soil in the Valley was also compacted by years of glacial erosion. The land tends to lift which also causes minor tremors. Mont-Royal for example, is a volcanic intrusion caused by the uplift motion of the soil.

Montreal and the St-Lawrence Valley is the second most active seismic zone in Canada after BC. Tall Buildings in Montreal are designed to withstand earthquakes of 6-7 magnitude.
A magnitude 7 or even 6 earthquake would instantly kill hundreds if not thousands of people i.e in Haiti the earthquake was 6.5. Of course we would faire better since our buildings are well built.

In fact the last major earthquake in Quebec was in 1988 and was 5.0 so this 4.5 quake is still noticeable... Especially for someone like me who lives in a basement and that power got cut out when the quake happened,

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Old
10-11-2012, 09:14 PM
  #146
DumFries
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A magnitude 7 or even 6 earthquake would instantly kill hundreds if not thousands of people i.e in Haiti the earthquake was 6.5. Of course we would faire better since our buildings are well built.

In fact the last major earthquake in Quebec was in 1988 and was 5.0 so this 4.5 quake is still noticeable... Especially for someone like me who lives in a basement and that power got cut out when the quake happened,
The one in 88 hit Saguenay with 6.0 magnitude or 5.9. Our buildings are made to withstand 6.0 earthquakes. You can't compare Haiti with us when their buildings were made out of mud. Also, the type of soil plays a major role on how the waves are propagated and how damage can happen.

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10-12-2012, 08:41 AM
  #147
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A magnitude 7 or even 6 earthquake would instantly kill hundreds if not thousands of people i.e in Haiti
So wrong.

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10-15-2012, 10:44 PM
  #148
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Byfuglien was visiting and he fell down

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11-06-2012, 03:07 AM
  #149
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ANOTHER ONE!??! What the **** is going on.

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11-06-2012, 03:08 AM
  #150
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I was just about to ask... that one was smaller though... I guess I'm not crazy ! It didn't wake up my family this time so It's safe to say it was relatively weak .

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