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Old
10-21-2012, 11:19 AM
  #26
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Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Exactly what happened with my two year old. Good start though I think.
Think might go again Tuesday.
I seen a little kid about the same on Bob skates givin' er around, but I've seen several people say not to use those and go right to skates. But it almost seems like it would be a good idea for atleast a couple times so they can see what it's like to stand on the ice.

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10-22-2012, 01:12 AM
  #27
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I have a 2 year old who hasn't touched ice yet, and a 3 year old who is the next Crosby (in his mind ). Here are some scattered suggestions from my experiences with the older boy a year ago:

1) First of all, maybe most importantly, remember to think about this as if you were the toddler. What part of this process would you like the most? Probably not the actual skating part, right?

I figured out fast that my boy really wanted to LOOK and feel like a real hockey player out there. I bought him a little Canes jersey, a hockey helmet (yes, they do make them that small), shoulder pads, gloves, the whole shebang. Every trip to the rink was like Halloween. He got to put all the pads on one at a time, and got a load of attention from strangers. If there were players or coaches around, they'd notice him and talk to him... one gave him a puck, which was a permanent memory. And when he fell, it wasn't painful or even cold. Finding the small equipment was a little difficult and mildly expensive, but it guaranteed he had fun with every trip to the rink.

2) Keep the skates on at home, because that's where he develops the ankle strength to stand up without wobbles. This plays right back into the dress-up aspect of pretending to be a player while running around the living room.

3) Save your back -- bring or find a very small, orange cone for him to push around. Back pain from bending to hold a child's hand is serious business, and it doesn't help him center his balance anyway. Do what you need to do to make him want to push that cone!

4) When it comes to fear of the ice, take it literally one step at a time.

What worked for me was asking him if I could put him on the ice and hold his hands while we sang his favorite song, then pick him up again. The song was like 20 seconds long, so by the end of it the fear was gone. Gradually we worked up to 1 hand, then no hands. Took 2 sessions to get rid of the fear altogether.

5) Take advantage of free previews for skating lessons. Most programs will give you a free first lesson to see if the child likes it. That's a free opportunity to check out their approach and see if it's based around having a fun experience. I am a believer in lessons, but the quality and philosophy of teaching is very hit or miss.

6) When he's old enough to hold a stick, take him to a stick and puck session... he won't really learn anything, but you'll both have a blast!

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10-23-2012, 03:44 PM
  #28
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Went today and went a lot better. He liked it a lot more.
Still wouldn't really try to stand too much... well was kinda stomping his feet, but was kinda leaning back so didn't really have any weight on his skates. But it was a good sign. I spun him around on the ice laying down, he really liked that.

I was going to sing his favorite song if he didn't want to be on the ice, but he was good to go. Also they had a bunch of push devices for kids, but he really didn't like it, going to have to get used to it.

My back and feet were absolutely killing me though. Seriously, like 10minutes and I was about done.

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10-23-2012, 04:13 PM
  #29
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A lot of rinks have those penguin things kids push around

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10-23-2012, 04:14 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheelhockey View Post
I have a 2 year old who hasn't touched ice yet, and a 3 year old who is the next Crosby (in his mind ). Here are some scattered suggestions from my experiences with the older boy a year ago:

1) First of all, maybe most importantly, remember to think about this as if you were the toddler. What part of this process would you like the most? Probably not the actual skating part, right?

I figured out fast that my boy really wanted to LOOK and feel like a real hockey player out there. I bought him a little Canes jersey, a hockey helmet (yes, they do make them that small), shoulder pads, gloves, the whole shebang. Every trip to the rink was like Halloween. He got to put all the pads on one at a time, and got a load of attention from strangers. If there were players or coaches around, they'd notice him and talk to him... one gave him a puck, which was a permanent memory. And when he fell, it wasn't painful or even cold. Finding the small equipment was a little difficult and mildly expensive, but it guaranteed he had fun with every trip to the rink.

2) Keep the skates on at home, because that's where he develops the ankle strength to stand up without wobbles. This plays right back into the dress-up aspect of pretending to be a player while running around the living room.

3) Save your back -- bring or find a very small, orange cone for him to push around. Back pain from bending to hold a child's hand is serious business, and it doesn't help him center his balance anyway. Do what you need to do to make him want to push that cone!

4) When it comes to fear of the ice, take it literally one step at a time.

What worked for me was asking him if I could put him on the ice and hold his hands while we sang his favorite song, then pick him up again. The song was like 20 seconds long, so by the end of it the fear was gone. Gradually we worked up to 1 hand, then no hands. Took 2 sessions to get rid of the fear altogether.

5) Take advantage of free previews for skating lessons. Most programs will give you a free first lesson to see if the child likes it. That's a free opportunity to check out their approach and see if it's based around having a fun experience. I am a believer in lessons, but the quality and philosophy of teaching is very hit or miss.

6) When he's old enough to hold a stick, take him to a stick and puck session... he won't really learn anything, but you'll both have a blast!
Awesome advice. Working on helping my 3 year old skate and this reads a checklist.

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Old
11-02-2012, 11:05 PM
  #31
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Been going once or twice a week now. He seems to like it. His favorite part is lying on the ice and me spinning him though lol.
My back is killing me too.

He doesn't really seem to be getting the concept, but towards the end of it, he seems to be a lot better. Sometimes he just gets lazy and just lets his feet go, not trying to pick them up to stand up. Gets frustrating.

I try to get him to march, but he doesn't really get the concept of it. He marches his feet, but does it fast, so he's not really getting a chance to balance. Obviously still very young and have to be patient, but his buddy who is four months older, is doing very well, and me being competitive...

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11-06-2012, 05:32 PM
  #32
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We used "walking Wings" to hold the kids up when we were teaching them to skate.

http://www.toysrus.ca/product/index....ductId=2852945

It really saved on our backs. It also was easier to help them find their balance as they were not holding on to something. To start with I would recommend just getting him to stand. Once he can stand get him to take little steps. If little steps is too hard, just get him to move one foot.

When they are getting tired of standing, I skate with them in my arms or hold them up with the walking wing straps and get them to point their feet out in front while I am skating. I hold most of thier weight but have a little weight on their legs so they can stear.

I have the straps on my wrists and try to never let them fall onto the ice untill they can actually do some movement on their own. One hard fall can set them back a lot.

Make sure it is fun for them or they will not want to do it.

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11-07-2012, 10:16 PM
  #33
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What about starting a 3-4 yr old out on inline skates?

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11-07-2012, 10:21 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by deadphish23 View Post
What about starting a 3-4 yr old out on inline skates?
If you want to steer them into ice skating/ice hockey then I wouldn't think so. Don't want to develop bad habits I guess.

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11-07-2012, 10:45 PM
  #35
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One tip I've figured out, my kid gets very dismayed about falling, even if he doesn't end up with an owie. But it's inevitable that at some point they will take a tumble.

So every time we're on the ice at the rink, I've started to make it a habit of doing a few "ohh no, I'm falling!" tumbles to the ice to demo that it's okay to fall down and get back up again. When he does fall, he isn't as mentally shaken and sometimes even laughs about it. He's also more willing to try more things because he's not as afraid of falling down.

Picked up some knee/elbow pads (in addition to a manditory helmet) for the kid so he isn't as likely to get hurt.

I also wear a pair of volleyball kneepads under my jeans to protect my old bones from the pretend falls and when I need to down on a knee to help him. But that's just me being an old wuss.

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11-07-2012, 11:57 PM
  #36
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I agree with the stick n puck once he's got his legs and he's a year or so older. I've personally never gone (don't have a kid to bring!) but there are tons of family stick n puck times at all my local arenas where it's meant to be mom/dad with son/daughter shooting around a soft puck.

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11-08-2012, 12:28 PM
  #37
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I would say no, tie the skates tight and let him get use to that. Watch Gretzky as a kid, research how Gretzkys father taught him the game.

let him enjoy it, let him have fun. But teach him values and importance.

I would like to also suggest start him with a wood stick to grasp a better feel for the puck. And as straight as a blade as possible, seriously

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11-11-2012, 12:31 AM
  #38
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Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
If you want to steer them into ice skating/ice hockey then I wouldn't think so. Don't want to develop bad habits I guess.
That makes sense. There is a pretty nice outdoor inline rink in our neighborhood though. Both my sons want to there everyday if possible. My 6 year old who is a mini-mite will skate inline maybe 1-2 times per week, and is on the ice for practice/games 3 times per week.

It'd be hard to say "No, we can't go play roller hockey" when it is fun for me, too...and the time I can really teach and reinforce what his coaches teach.

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11-11-2012, 09:57 AM
  #39
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Originally Posted by deadphish23 View Post
That makes sense. There is a pretty nice outdoor inline rink in our neighborhood though. Both my sons want to there everyday if possible. My 6 year old who is a mini-mite will skate inline maybe 1-2 times per week, and is on the ice for practice/games 3 times per week.

It'd be hard to say "No, we can't go play roller hockey" when it is fun for me, too...and the time I can really teach and reinforce what his coaches teach.
In the end though, what's more important? Having fun I hope.

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11-11-2012, 12:35 PM
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isbrant View Post
We used "walking Wings" to hold the kids up when we were teaching them to skate.

http://www.toysrus.ca/product/index....ductId=2852945

It really saved on our backs. It also was easier to help them find their balance as they were not holding on to something. To start with I would recommend just getting him to stand. Once he can stand get him to take little steps. If little steps is too hard, just get him to move one foot.

When they are getting tired of standing, I skate with them in my arms or hold them up with the walking wing straps and get them to point their feet out in front while I am skating. I hold most of thier weight but have a little weight on their legs so they can stear.

I have the straps on my wrists and try to never let them fall onto the ice untill they can actually do some movement on their own. One hard fall can set them back a lot.

Make sure it is fun for them or they will not want to do it.
THanks a lot I will check that out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
One tip I've figured out, my kid gets very dismayed about falling, even if he doesn't end up with an owie. But it's inevitable that at some point they will take a tumble.

So every time we're on the ice at the rink, I've started to make it a habit of doing a few "ohh no, I'm falling!" tumbles to the ice to demo that it's okay to fall down and get back up again. When he does fall, he isn't as mentally shaken and sometimes even laughs about it. He's also more willing to try more things because he's not as afraid of falling down.

Picked up some knee/elbow pads (in addition to a manditory helmet) for the kid so he isn't as likely to get hurt.

I also wear a pair of volleyball kneepads under my jeans to protect my old bones from the pretend falls and when I need to down on a knee to help him. But that's just me being an old wuss.
That's what I was thinking too, when he fell I would just fall too. Not quite ready for that yet.

He got a lot better the last few times we went. He's starting to catch on. He hated the little helpers (made from PVC), but last couple times he's hanging on and pushing them. And when I hold him now he'll walk. He's had enough in about 15 seconds, but it's a good start.

He also loves the zamboni now and can't wait to see it when we go.

THanks for all the help.

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11-11-2012, 02:00 PM
  #41
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Took my daughter skating for the second time this season (had to wait for my MCL to heal up.) We did the hand holding thing the whole time but I noticed that she did better when I kept my hand as low as possible to discourage her from hanging on it.

In the end she insisted on standing unassisted. We have one of those gliders she can hold onto so we'll take that to the rink next time. I think we're just a few sessions away from her skating on her own. Just in time for the outdoor rinks to open.

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11-12-2012, 09:00 PM
  #42
tarheelhockey
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Originally Posted by Thesensation19 View Post
I would like to also suggest start him with a wood stick to grasp a better feel for the puck. And as straight as a blade as possible, seriously
At that age, anything other than wood is throwing money down a hole.

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We did the hand holding thing the whole time but I noticed that she did better when I kept my hand as low as possible to discourage her from hanging on it.
100% true. Keeping your hands low forces your kid to find their natural balance... unfortunately your back might have something to say about it!

I have had some success skating backwards in front of my kid with a low knee bend and hands out. That puts him in a natural skating position, hands relatively low, and I don't bend my back quite as much.

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11-14-2012, 08:16 AM
  #43
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The local rink here does toddlers right. They gear them up in hockey pads so they can't hardly hurt themselves. Then the set them loose on the ice with an instructor who keeps it very fun and light. He hauls a huge stuffed tiger around that they try to jump on. He uses the pads they use to break up the ice for cross-ice as a big choo-choo train. He makes sure the kids have a riot and want to come back for more. If you can find something similar in your neck of the woods, I would go that route.


Last edited by reecardo: 11-14-2012 at 08:16 AM. Reason: the->they
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11-14-2012, 08:57 AM
  #44
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That's brilliant stuff! Will keep an eye out for something like that.

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11-14-2012, 09:57 AM
  #45
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He also loves the zamboni now and can't wait to see it when we go.
My kid loves the zamboni too. He loves any big machines like construction. Always let him have plenty of time watching it clean the ice while I get my skates off. Another carrot to make the experience fun.

We also have a routine of going for Arby's lunch afterwards. Nice reward for a good effort.

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11-15-2012, 09:10 AM
  #46
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Just found this, sounds like a good read for the youngsters and parents out there!

http://www.itsokaytofall.com/

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11-15-2012, 08:41 PM
  #47
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Thanks for the advice.
The skating lessons I'm iffy about. That's how I started out, and I absolutely hated it, which is why I dropped it all together, and never played hockey until later on in life. One of my biggest regrets in life, though obviously it wasn't something I could really control at the time.
Though I wouldn't be surprised if skating lessons are completely changed now, and the kids actually enjoy it. Back then it was meant as a lesson and not fun, I'm guessing they try to make it funner now.
I think in general that most places these days have figured out that they'll bring in more kids/be more successful if they make the lessons fun. Pretty much any lessons or physical activity for kids 5 and under should be this way.

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11-15-2012, 11:55 PM
  #48
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I think in general that most places these days have figured out that they'll bring in more kids/be more successful if they make the lessons fun. Pretty much any lessons or physical activity for kids 5 and under should be this way.
Wish they figured this out when I was younger! All I remember is that I hated it, and dreaded it. I think it was early morning or something. I don't know why I hated it so much. My dad played hockey too, so you'd think I would have wanted to play.

Any recommendations for helmets? I'm using a bike helmet now, but I'm worried about him falling on his face. I think another week and I want to show him how to fall and what it's like to fall.


Last edited by bazaaa*: 11-16-2012 at 12:13 AM.
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Old
11-16-2012, 10:34 AM
  #49
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Bauer helmet + cage - that should work

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11-16-2012, 03:21 PM
  #50
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Thanks. I actually think that's the one we just tried on a couple hours ago.
Is a cage that important? I see it as important, as they have poor balance and can fall face first.
But I see so many helmets and videos of kids with helmets with no cages?


Last edited by bazaaa*: 11-16-2012 at 03:29 PM.
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