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Has anyone purchased a Tour Des Canadiens condo?

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Old
10-30-2012, 02:45 PM
  #51
coolasprICE
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Originally Posted by OpenIceHit View Post
I don't think prices will go down. They can stagnate for a few years but he doesn't risk anything buying one of these condos at that price. And renting it or using Airbnb will certainly help him make a little profit while waiting for the price of housing to go up again a few years later.
A 20 percent correction is realistic possibility. if we talk about stagnation why put money in real estate if one believes the market will weaken.

If one believed there will be stagnation in the near future a better investment approach would be to buy a unit off desperate sellers.

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10-30-2012, 08:07 PM
  #52
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Went to check it out today. I made an appointment two weeks ago through the website. All but four units are sold as of now EXCEPT they are opening up four more floors worth of condos on Saturday to the public. Way it works is they want 5000$ to hold you're place. You have ten days to come up with the mortgage approval from the bank and have 5 percent (minus the 5000k you put down). Then another 5 percent 60 days from then. Then another 5 percent 90 days from then and finally another 120 from that initial date. Oh and the option to buy parking (for 60k) isn't available to the smaller units. I think the minimum you need to be purchasing goes for around 360k.

Awesome perks however were 10 percent off all merchandise and at the cage in the bell centre. Also first dibs on purchasing season tickets and they have tons of raffles every season for games and jerseys and so on.

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10-30-2012, 08:30 PM
  #53
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Originally Posted by overlords View Post
Didn't want to start a new thread, but has any one bought one of them solid gold toilets?
This sums it up.

If anyone wants to throw their money out the window, go for it.

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10-30-2012, 08:43 PM
  #54
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This sums it up.

If anyone wants to throw their money out the window, go for it.
Yeah, it's not like gold isn't the most highly convertible precious metal or anything.

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10-30-2012, 09:14 PM
  #55
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Hmm, would I pay more money than I will make in the next decade to live in my worst nightmare, the middle of the city in a place packed with people who will no doubt be partying all the time (let's face it, that's what that place will be)?

Yeah, seems like a great idea!

Hell, I couldn't even stand living in Longueuil because the city was too loud for me.

I seriously don't understand how that amount of money is considered reasonable. I rent an apartment of similar size than that for 550 a month and have done so everywhere I've been before. Most younger people room so it's more like 350-400 each a month for a 2 people apartment and that's a reasonable price.

Even in a place like Montreal with high prices, you can rent an apartment for 550-600 a month (granted you'll be taking the metro or driving a while but that's not a huge deal). This price tag would get me a complete house in NB, with a big yard and peace & quiet! I can only dream of the day I have that much money.

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10-30-2012, 10:23 PM
  #56
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I'll just say that people have gotten used to the low interest rate and if/when it goes up again ....many people will suffer

I see this kind of condo as the perfect trap for these people.

also, I assume many are seeing this as an investment . if they have the money for it , fine. if they are taking on debt , I see a risk.

I'm very conservative. Like many have said, if a business man is looking for a small place or something and he has the money ...why not. better that then thousands in hotel rooms.

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10-30-2012, 10:42 PM
  #57
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Originally Posted by Woland View Post
I'll just say that people have gotten used to the low interest rate and if/when it goes up again ....many people will suffer

I see this kind of condo as the perfect trap for these people.

also, I assume many are seeing this as an investment . if they have the money for it , fine. if they are taking on debt , I see a risk.

I'm very conservative. Like many have said, if a business man is looking for a small place or something and he has the money ...why not. better that then thousands in hotel rooms.
I don't think many of us have 400k cash in the bank.

The condo market in Toronto has fallen off by over 20% but all the perks this particular building offer might actually hold its value better than any other local condo. Granted it's gonna be like a 2nd home for the wealthy.

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10-31-2012, 10:56 AM
  #58
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Originally Posted by CN_paladin View Post
I don't think many of us have 400k cash in the bank.

The condo market in Toronto has fallen off by over 20% but all the perks this particular building offer might actually hold its value better than any other local condo. Granted it's gonna be like a 2nd home for the wealthy.
The Toronto market hasn't fallen in price yet YOY, sales are down, people are expecting prices to come down but so far prices are still flat or up vs last year.

I'm surprised at the prices though for the condos in Montreal, and parking at 60K a shot is crazy. $350-$400K is what a one bedroom is selling for in Maple leaf square front of the ACC in Toronto.

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10-31-2012, 12:35 PM
  #59
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I have been looking at condos lately, especially since I just bought one not long ago. Here's my though on these condos:

First of all, the location of these condos are in the heart of downtown. It might cost you 360k to get something decent with an indoor parking (I read that on this thread somewhere). But you have to think of it from outside the box.

I mean yes they are very expensive and small, but in 10 years...I think the value will almost double. And if you buy a condo you have to think about this because sooner or later (say 5-10 years max) you will either:
A) Rent it out and let your rental income pay the mortgage, or
B) Sell it and make some 100k+ profit that you can use as a downpayment for your next house.

The value is going up, some people might say that there will be a real estate market crash here in Montreal, I respond by telling them to look at the Vancover and the rest of Canada's real estate market. It will just keep going up. And if it does crash at a point...You keep it and you buy something else since houses will be cheap!!! buy low sell high.

Anyways...I would not be able to afford a condo like that at this point in my life, but if I had the money I would buy one just to rent it out and keep it as an investment. These condos are not only in a great location, but have potential to make you ****loads of money when you sell it in 5 years from now.

I bought me a Condo 2 months ago in Dix30...Very nice, modern, with alot of space for about 100k less. And the value of Dix30 real estate is going up at a fast rate right now so I dont regret my decision.

I'm the one who's going to be living with the players, they're all a street away from me!

*high fives Gorges*

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Old
10-31-2012, 08:20 PM
  #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaMMuT View Post

I mean yes they are very expensive and small, but in 10 years...I think the value will almost double. And if you buy a condo you have to think about this because sooner or later (say 5-10 years max) you will either:
A) Rent it out and let your rental income pay the mortgage, or
B) Sell it and make some 100k+ profit that you can use as a downpayment for your next house.
I see you have a lot of faith in this idea that the real estate market will double, and continuously grow, and get bigger. You do realize that such thinking is flawed, and this is what any real estate agent and developer would like you to believe.

It's this line of thinking that creates big trouble.

BTW: Montreal condo prices decline in August
http://www.montrealgazette.com/Montr...844/story.html

To some up my opinion quickly, condo is the riskiest of any residential real estate investment, because:

- If employment levels dip - condos lose out right away on single dwelling renters, who will either move back home, move out of the city etc.. This creates a sudden surge of supply and drastic vacancy jump and price drop.

Example. Two men have the same job. 1 is renting or paying off a mortgage on a condo in Montreal. The other is married with kids, and is paying off a mortgage on a house in NDG.

The man in NDG will have the abilty to rely on his wifes income, and has the obligation to keep that home since he has kids and packing up and moving is not as easy.

The man that owns the condo has a much higher chance of wanting to sell asap. Again - more people wanting to sell - more choice for buyer - less demand for each unite - prices stagnate or drop.


- Supply can be endless. This is true in the city but even more true in suburbs. Every time a new project is built on a piece of land you are adding hundreds of units.

Example, a condo in Laval, might seem like a gem today, but tomorrow there will be 5 equivalents with a block radius.

A safer investment is a home, sitting on precious land in the city, such as Cote-st.luc / NDG, Westmount, tmr etc.


Quote:
The value is going up, some people might say that there will be a real estate market crash here in Montreal, I respond by telling them to look at the Vancover and the rest of Canada's real estate market. It will just keep going up.
Vancouver Housing Bubble: Prices Decline By 25 Per Cent
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/09...n_1890553.html

Toronto condo sales plunge, prices stagnate

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...rticle4615396/


And the correction is not even complete - this is just the beginning.

However we can not compare the market to Toronto with Montreal. Toronto is a lot more global and foreign money is a lot more interested in Toronto than Montreal.




Now, if you believe that the our economic forecasts in the next 5 to 10 years is all rosey and that employment opportunities will be growing at a faster rate than they have been, than I can rationalize a purchase in todays market.

However if job growth remains stagnant and supply continues to grow this rate - I don't see prices doubling in 10 years. Surely not for condos, be it downtown or off the island.

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Old
11-01-2012, 05:54 AM
  #61
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As the title say's, did anyone go purchase a condo this past weekend? Prices were as low as $250 to $260K for 1 bedroom units.

Please discuss!

arent the ones starting at 250K 1 rooms? not 1 bedrooms. I think they are bachelor pads

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11-01-2012, 07:00 AM
  #62
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This forum has a lot of young pups hehehe. I'm much older than most of you, I guess. My kids have left home, my youngest just left to study at Ahuntsic, my 3000sq ft house is wayyyyy too big. Mind you, I'm not in the Montreal area, but we are thinking of selling the house and getting either a condo (which I prefer, less work to do) or a townhouse (which my wife prefers because bigger) closer to the 'action' (we live in Gatineau, so 'action' is a pretty big word).

If I had the cash and would be in Montreal, I would surely buy a condo downtown. I love big cities. I would move to NYC in a heartbeat.

The difference being: I have no kids at home anymore. Grass, inground pool, garden, cleaning up the house, snow blowing during winter...stupid chores for me right now. I'd rather spend my time travelling.

Oh! As for the groceries, when you're two and live in a big city (close to downtown), you do your grocery by the day, like in Europe. So having 5 bags is out of the question. It doesn't work that way. When you live there, you change your consuming habits A LOT.

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11-01-2012, 08:57 AM
  #63
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A concern I have about the downtown area is that the urban planning of Montreal points in the direction of less easy access to the city via automobile, and an increased emphasis on public transport. There are two problems here.

1- housing is getting so expensive on the island for young families, that they are forced to live off island.
2- public transportation is not geared for people who are off the island. You need to get onto the island, or at least very close to it to use public transport.

This makes the downtown core less attractive for employers with good salaried jobs looking for a employees. The extra costs involved for the business and for the employees makes areas like the South Shore, Laval, and possibly the West Island more attractive to set up a business. Less new businesses, less consumers downtown. That hits retailers and restaurants already suffering from traffic woes, parking headaches and protest after protest.

Add in a possible hike in interest rates...

I guess people who want the experience of living in the city cannot find a way to not think it is an awesome idea, and people who have already done it may find it just does not suit their goals regarding quality of life.

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11-01-2012, 09:00 AM
  #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deandebean View Post
This forum has a lot of young pups hehehe. I'm much older than most of you, I guess. My kids have left home, my youngest just left to study at Ahuntsic, my 3000sq ft house is wayyyyy too big. Mind you, I'm not in the Montreal area, but we are thinking of selling the house and getting either a condo (which I prefer, less work to do) or a townhouse (which my wife prefers because bigger) closer to the 'action' (we live in Gatineau, so 'action' is a pretty big word).

If I had the cash and would be in Montreal, I would surely buy a condo downtown. I love big cities. I would move to NYC in a heartbeat.

The difference being: I have no kids at home anymore. Grass, inground pool, garden, cleaning up the house, snow blowing during winter...stupid chores for me right now. I'd rather spend my time travelling.

Oh! As for the groceries, when you're two and live in a big city (close to downtown), you do your grocery by the day, like in Europe. So having 5 bags is out of the question. It doesn't work that way. When you live there, you change your consuming habits A LOT.
I did the exact opposite of what you are saying. Lived in the city, then moved to something less populated and bigger.

Shopping everyday for food, that gets old. It is an exercise in killing YOUR time.

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11-01-2012, 09:42 AM
  #65
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Originally Posted by coolasprICE View Post
I see you have a lot of faith in this idea that the real estate market will double, and continuously grow, and get bigger. You do realize that such thinking is flawed, and this is what any real estate agent and developer would like you to believe.

It's this line of thinking that creates big trouble.

BTW: Montreal condo prices decline in August
http://www.montrealgazette.com/Montr...844/story.html

To some up my opinion quickly, condo is the riskiest of any residential real estate investment, because:

- If employment levels dip - condos lose out right away on single dwelling renters, who will either move back home, move out of the city etc.. This creates a sudden surge of supply and drastic vacancy jump and price drop.

Example. Two men have the same job. 1 is renting or paying off a mortgage on a condo in Montreal. The other is married with kids, and is paying off a mortgage on a house in NDG.

The man in NDG will have the abilty to rely on his wifes income, and has the obligation to keep that home since he has kids and packing up and moving is not as easy.

The man that owns the condo has a much higher chance of wanting to sell asap. Again - more people wanting to sell - more choice for buyer - less demand for each unite - prices stagnate or drop.


- Supply can be endless. This is true in the city but even more true in suburbs. Every time a new project is built on a piece of land you are adding hundreds of units.

Example, a condo in Laval, might seem like a gem today, but tomorrow there will be 5 equivalents with a block radius.

A safer investment is a home, sitting on precious land in the city, such as Cote-st.luc / NDG, Westmount, tmr etc.




Vancouver Housing Bubble: Prices Decline By 25 Per Cent
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/09...n_1890553.html

Toronto condo sales plunge, prices stagnate

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...rticle4615396/


And the correction is not even complete - this is just the beginning.

However we can not compare the market to Toronto with Montreal. Toronto is a lot more global and foreign money is a lot more interested in Toronto than Montreal.




Now, if you believe that the our economic forecasts in the next 5 to 10 years is all rosey and that employment opportunities will be growing at a faster rate than they have been, than I can rationalize a purchase in todays market.

However if job growth remains stagnant and supply continues to grow this rate - I don't see prices doubling in 10 years. Surely not for condos, be it downtown or off the island.
Listen man, you have your opinion, and I have mine. If you believe that in 10 years prices of Condos will go down (lower than their actual value right now that is) then let me ask you this:

In the past 10 years, if you bought a condo at 100k, now it will be equal to at least 250k. If you bought a condo 15-20 years before that, the condo that was worth 75k is now worth 250K. People that bought their condos 30 years ago for I dont know how much, now they are worth at least 250k.

Land is becoming more and more scarce, population keeps on growing and aging. All the baby boomers that are gonna retire soon, where do you think they are going to live? in big houses? alot of them will actually start looking for condos. Not to buy only, but also to rent. An old man and woman will not want to cut grass, do the pool, clean a big house...they will want a little nice condo to settle in for the rest of their days. So even if prices do go down temporarily, renting it out will also be a good temporary option until the market prices readjust.

I agree with you that houses is a better investment. But for the prices they are being sold at right now it's why alot of people are opting to go for Condos. And the whole thing about unemployment causing high supply, I agree with you. But the baby boomers will increase the demand aswell causing it to go back to it's equilibrium point. But you do know that the last 5 years we've been going through a recession. We've had high unemployment rates and people were getting fired left and right. They still do! I even lost my job 2 years ago because of that but guess what? Condo prices are still high! they are higher than they have ever been and people are still buying them. There is alot of Condo constructions around the downtown area and we don't know how this will impact the Real estate market in the future for sure, but I think that the increase in Canda's aging population will increase that demand for condos in the near future. We might have that little bubble like Vancover is having right now, but overall, the price will still give you more than what you put in if you wait for the right moment to sell it. There always will be those fluctuations in prices but it will readjust. Just keep the condo and rent it out.

But then again, it's all a matter of opinion and speculation. I just dont see how prices will crash and stay low forever. There is that risk, of course, but in Canada and the way Canada has been handling it's economy, I think we're going to see a similar pattern than what we saw in the last 30 years.

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11-01-2012, 09:50 AM
  #66
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I love the idea that properties are guaranteed to double in value in the next 10 years.

We have just lived through one of the biggest housing booms ever all due to low interest rates. over the next ten years I think you'll see a small increase in prices, but nothing like we saw since 2000. People have taken on large amounts of debt, our economy will be heavily burdened by interest rate fluctuation.

I don't think the floor will fall out on us in Montreal because our homes didn't increase in value like in Vancouver or Toronto. But you have to think long and hard before purchasing anything these days as there are better alternatives IE Rent & max out your TFSA every year or buy your own business and put your extra cash into it.

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11-01-2012, 10:00 AM
  #67
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Originally Posted by RaMMuT View Post
Listen man, you have your opinion, and I have mine. If you believe that in 10 years prices of Condos will go down (lower than their actual value right now that is) then let me ask you this:

In the past 10 years, if you bought a condo at 100k, now it will be equal to at least 250k. If you bought a condo 15-20 years before that, the condo that was worth 75k is now worth 250K. People that bought their condos 30 years ago for I dont know how much, now they are worth at least 250k.

Land is becoming more and more scarce, population keeps on growing and aging. All the baby boomers that are gonna retire soon, where do you think they are going to live? in big houses? alot of them will actually start looking for condos. Not to buy only, but also to rent. An old man and woman will not want to cut grass, do the pool, clean a big house...they will want a little nice condo to settle in for the rest of their days. So even if prices do go down temporarily, renting it out will also be a good temporary option until the market prices readjust.

I agree with you that houses is a better investment. But for the prices they are being sold at right now it's why alot of people are opting to go for Condos. And the whole thing about unemployment causing high supply, I agree with you. But the baby boomers will increase the demand aswell causing it to go back to it's equilibrium point. But you do know that the last 5 years we've been going through a recession. We've had high unemployment rates and people were getting fired left and right. They still do! I even lost my job 2 years ago because of that but guess what? Condo prices are still high! they are higher than they have ever been and people are still buying them. There is alot of Condo constructions around the downtown area and we don't know how this will impact the Real estate market in the future for sure, but I think that the increase in Canda's aging population will increase that demand for condos in the near future. We might have that little bubble like Vancover is having right now, but overall, the price will still give you more than what you put in if you wait for the right moment to sell it. There always will be those fluctuations in prices but it will readjust. Just keep the condo and rent it out.

But then again, it's all a matter of opinion and speculation. I just dont see how prices will crash and stay low forever. There is that risk, of course, but in Canada and the way Canada has been handling it's economy, I think we're going to see a similar pattern than what we saw in the last 30 years.
Where are these condos that sold for 100K 10 years ago?

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11-01-2012, 10:10 AM
  #68
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Originally Posted by RaMMuT View Post
Listen man, you have your opinion, and I have mine. If you believe that in 10 years prices of Condos will go down (lower than their actual value right now that is) then let me ask you this:

In the past 10 years, if you bought a condo at 100k, now it will be equal to at least 250k. If you bought a condo 15-20 years before that, the condo that was worth 75k is now worth 250K. People that bought their condos 30 years ago for I dont know how much, now they are worth at least 250k.

Land is becoming more and more scarce, population keeps on growing and aging. All the baby boomers that are gonna retire soon, where do you think they are going to live? in big houses? alot of them will actually start looking for condos. Not to buy only, but also to rent. An old man and woman will not want to cut grass, do the pool, clean a big house...they will want a little nice condo to settle in for the rest of their days. So even if prices do go down temporarily, renting it out will also be a good temporary option until the market prices readjust.

I agree with you that houses is a better investment. But for the prices they are being sold at right now it's why alot of people are opting to go for Condos. And the whole thing about unemployment causing high supply, I agree with you. But the baby boomers will increase the demand aswell causing it to go back to it's equilibrium point. But you do know that the last 5 years we've been going through a recession. We've had high unemployment rates and people were getting fired left and right. They still do! I even lost my job 2 years ago because of that but guess what? Condo prices are still high! they are higher than they have ever been and people are still buying them. There is alot of Condo constructions around the downtown area and we don't know how this will impact the Real estate market in the future for sure, but I think that the increase in Canda's aging population will increase that demand for condos in the near future. We might have that little bubble like Vancover is having right now, but overall, the price will still give you more than what you put in if you wait for the right moment to sell it. There always will be those fluctuations in prices but it will readjust. Just keep the condo and rent it out.

But then again, it's all a matter of opinion and speculation. I just dont see how prices will crash and stay low forever. There is that risk, of course, but in Canada and the way Canada has been handling it's economy, I think we're going to see a similar pattern than what we saw in the last 30 years.
You also state that if I bought a condo for 75K 20 years ago it would have been worth 100K 10 years ago.....Suggesting a 33% increase over 10 years or a ROI of 3.3%, which, although acceptable today would have been laughed at as a ROI on the markets in the 90's.

Housing is never a bad investment, but to expect such a whopping return is laughable. You are buying in to the Real Estate dogma my friend.

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11-01-2012, 11:31 AM
  #69
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Originally Posted by Oleg Petrov View Post
Where are these condos that sold for 100K 10 years ago?
The first condos that got built in the Dix30 were being sold for 112k about 10 years ago. I went to check them out this year, and one guy wanted to sell his for 280k

I was also giving you guys estimations. I really don't know how much condos were exactly 20 years ago, but I do know that a HOUSE back then would cost around 100k to 150k. The big houses were going for 250 at the time and now these same houses go for at least 500k (I'm talking about the 250k houses) whereas any condo you look at nowdays will be at least 200k.

Look you guys believe whatever you want, but any property you bought 20 years ago will definately be worth selling and making at least 100k when the time is right.

My parents bought their house 10 years ago for 280k, now our house is valued at 500k by the bank and this was 2 months ago. Maybe prices might not double again in 10 years the same way they have but FOR SURE they will be much higher than what you would pay for right now. And to me this is good enough of an investment, way more safer than investing in stocks or RRSPs

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11-01-2012, 11:49 AM
  #70
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Originally Posted by RaMMuT View Post
Listen man, you have your opinion, and I have mine. If you believe that in 10 years prices of Condos will go down (lower than their actual value right now that is) then let me ask you this:

In the past 10 years, if you bought a condo at 100k, now it will be equal to at least 250k. If you bought a condo 15-20 years before that, the condo that was worth 75k is now worth 250K. People that bought their condos 30 years ago for I dont know how much, now they are worth at least 250k.

Land is becoming more and more scarce, population keeps on growing and aging. All the baby boomers that are gonna retire soon, where do you think they are going to live? in big houses? alot of them will actually start looking for condos. Not to buy only, but also to rent. An old man and woman will not want to cut grass, do the pool, clean a big house...they will want a little nice condo to settle in for the rest of their days. So even if prices do go down temporarily, renting it out will also be a good temporary option until the market prices readjust.
Okay, look at it this way:

House prices have gone up A LOT, based only on credit growth (read: cheap credit caused by low interest rates). Based on wage/income growth, it would never have moved in the last 10 years because it hasn't grown at all.

Now, credit growth is slowing, even though interest rates are still low. This means less sales now, and prices follow later (supply/demand anyone?).

If interest rates move even 0.5% higher, supply will go up and demand down because less first-time buyers will buy in. This will eventually cause prices to go down too.

I don't know much but I know this: Buying today, after this 100%+ increase on no fundamental reason, is buying the TOP (read: buying HIGH), to sell LOW. Not the other way around. There is NOTHING to fuel this further.... except if governments start GIVING first home buyers 10K+$ freely to keep the bubble alive, or some other trick like that.

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11-01-2012, 12:20 PM
  #71
coolasprICE
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Originally Posted by RaMMuT View Post
The first condos that got built in the Dix30 were being sold for 112k about 10 years ago. I went to check them out this year, and one guy wanted to sell his for 280k

I was also giving you guys estimations. I really don't know how much condos were exactly 20 years ago, but I do know that a HOUSE back then would cost around 100k to 150k. The big houses were going for 250 at the time and now these same houses go for at least 500k (I'm talking about the 250k houses) whereas any condo you look at nowdays will be at least 200k.

Look you guys believe whatever you want, but any property you bought 20 years ago will definately be worth selling and making at least 100k when the time is right.

My parents bought their house 10 years ago for 280k, now our house is valued at 500k by the bank and this was 2 months ago. Maybe prices might not double again in 10 years the same way they have but FOR SURE they will be much higher than what you would pay for right now. And to me this is good enough of an investment, way more safer than investing in stocks or RRSPs
Politics, and threat of separation, was one reason why prices were so cheap. Over 500,000 people left in a decade - in the 80s and most of the 90s, nobody was able to sell anything.

You were able to purchase a house in lower westmount for $220K

What happened after is that the job market and exodus stabilized, and for once, the province was even seeing slight population growth - instead of decline.

Couple that with all the facts already mentioned to you by posters and you have the great returns from the last 10 years.

Like others, I agree that we are not in a huge bubble but there will be a correction and I do believe that prices can go down moderately.

Regarding the baby-boomers - you are still forgetting that condo in the suburbs is not considered as precious land. Developers can build 5 minutes from Dix30 and cater to these people at any point in time, even branding it as retirement condos. The moment they have an opportunity and a green light to build, they will do so. And this hurts the resell market - because lets be honest, buying something new vs something already lived in...

This is the difference between buying a condo in the suburbs and buying a duplex near a metro line. Condo market is very risky for these reasons.

I also think we overstate the amount of retirees that want to move into condos - i know many that want to have a garden, a pool in the backyard, extra space for when the grandchildren come over etc..

Don't get me wrong, if you sustain an income and remain employed, you are not going to lose your shirt by owning a condo - I just hope that you enjoy living in a condo for the years to come and that's what counts.

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11-01-2012, 02:58 PM
  #72
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Think long and hard Montreal if you really want to densify your city. This what TO is suppose to look like in 2020. They trying to go the way of big cities in North America. But perhaps Montreal should follow the urban plan of major European cities.




And it doesn't even include these other 2 proposals.





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11-01-2012, 02:59 PM
  #73
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I did the exact opposite of what you are saying. Lived in the city, then moved to something less populated and bigger.

Shopping everyday for food, that gets old. It is an exercise in killing YOUR time.
Please. I buy most of my dry goods once a week (or less). About 4 or 5 times a week on my way home from school I buy my meat and vegetables that I need for dinner. This literally takes about 10-15 minutes tops.

Please explain to me how spending an hour or two shopping once a week is any different than splitting it up incrementally.

Of course, the biggest benefit of this method is that you are buying your produce and meat fresh and eating it that day.

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11-01-2012, 03:15 PM
  #74
swimmer77
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Well if I had the money to spend I would give it careful consideration, I really would. Have been a country bumpkin all of my life but have always enjoyed big cities with lots to do.

Actually ideally if I had the money and luxury to buy 3 properties one would be a waterfront (ocean, waterway) of some sort, another would be in a big city and another would be somewhere that I could get away from it all. LOL

And put me in the "shops everyday for groceries crowd". Nothing like fresh, fresh food instead of a bunch of preservative laden crap. I shudder to think at what chemicals have gone through my body. I'm hoping that beer is and always has been a good cleanser. LOL

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11-01-2012, 03:59 PM
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The MTL real estate market had been hit really hard by the separatist movement in the 90s hence most of houses probably doubled in value in the past decade or so. If the average house costs 400k now no way the same one will be worth 800k in 10 year.

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