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Voyager outside of the Solar System?

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Old
10-10-2012, 12:40 PM
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Fish on The Sand
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Voyager outside of the Solar System?

Looks like it

http://phys.org/news/2012-10-voyager-left-solar.html

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10-10-2012, 12:44 PM
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Masao
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Perhaps it's because of the Kuiper belt

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Old
10-10-2012, 05:35 PM
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I thought it''d left a while ago?

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Old
10-10-2012, 09:10 PM
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kingsholygrail
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Is it built to continue functioning that far out?

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10-10-2012, 09:24 PM
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Long Duk Dong
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsholygrail View Post
Is it built to continue functioning that far out?
Up until 2025 or so. Considering it was built in 1977, that's a hell of an achievement. That's how they know. That little ******* still sends back data. I'm not positive, but I think I read somewhere it takes 8 hours for NASA to receive info from it since its so far out. That's badass, and it kind of annoys me that major news networks don't do a story on it.

A man made object leaving our solar system to me is just as important as sending someone to the moon.

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10-10-2012, 09:48 PM
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This is an incredible achievement. We've sent our first object completely out of our solar system, with two more following behind it.

Man I wish Pioneer 10 was still functioning. It would be great if all three of them could still send back data.

Voyager 1 is almost 122 AU away. And it takes light almost 17 hours to reach it from the sun. It is astonishing that communication is even possible at those distances.

For comparison, Pluto, at its most distant point in its orbit around the sun, is only 49 AU away.

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10-10-2012, 10:05 PM
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This is one of those times that the article title confuses people because the layperson's definition of the solar system is different from what NASA is talking about.

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10-11-2012, 05:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Long Duk Dong View Post
Up until 2025 or so. Considering it was built in 1977, that's a hell of an achievement. That's how they know. That little ******* still sends back data. I'm not positive, but I think I read somewhere it takes 8 hours for NASA to receive info from it since its so far out. That's badass, and it kind of annoys me that major news networks don't do a story on it.

A man made object leaving our solar system to me is just as important as sending someone to the moon.
I don't know about it being just as important as getting a man on the moon. It's one thing to send out probes and another to transport a human being.

They should send another voyager though, with updated tech and all that.

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Old
10-11-2012, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by kingsholygrail View Post
They should send another voyager though, with updated tech and all that.
To get all the gas giants, a probe can only be sent when the alignment is correct. This happens once every 175 years.

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The Planetary Grand Tour was an ambitious plan to send unmanned probes to the planets of the outer solar system. Conceived by Gary Flandro of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the late 1960s, the Grand Tour would have exploited the alignment of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, an event that would occur in the late 1970s, and not recur for 175 years. A probe sent to Jupiter could use that planet as a gravitational slingshot to extend its trajectory to planets further out in the Solar System.
I always got a nerdy laugh when I watched a documentary on Voyager and they were interviewing one of the engineers. The engineer was describing how the alignment only happened rarely and that the last time it happened (early 1800s), the President totally blew it.

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10-11-2012, 04:15 PM
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I'd forgotten that Voyager I was launched two weeks after Voyager II. Silly NASA, releasing the sequel first. Somehow, Voyager I is the one that made it out of the Solar System first, though. Maybe it's due to the fact that Voyager II visited Uranus and Neptune, which probably slowed it down. Speaking of which, I wonder if Voyager I will move away faster now that it's not being affected by the Sun's or any of the planets' gravity... not that it really matters, since there's not really anything more to get to (in our civilization's lifetime).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brodeur View Post
I always got a nerdy laugh when I watched a documentary on Voyager and they were interviewing one of the engineers. The engineer was describing how the alignment only happened rarely and that the last time it happened (early 1800s), the President totally blew it.
It was likely Thomas Jefferson, too, that supposed great champion of science. Talk about totally dropping the ball in your event.

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Old
10-11-2012, 07:51 PM
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Neat, but I'm confused..... I was under the impression that the Oort Cloud was the barrier of our solar system, and Voyager's still billions of miles away from that hypothetically is located.

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Old
10-12-2012, 05:13 AM
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kingsholygrail
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Originally Posted by Brodeur View Post
To get all the gas giants, a probe can only be sent when the alignment is correct. This happens once every 175 years.
Ah okay. I have to remind myself that space is an apt name for it.

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Old
11-12-2012, 08:46 AM
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I didn't even know the Voyager existed (sadly) before i watched a documentary on Netflix. Very cool how it uses that "Gravitational Slingshot" to move around so efficiently.

What data is it collecting actually. Its not a telescope right?

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11-12-2012, 10:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xX Hot Fuss View Post
I didn't even know the Voyager existed (sadly) before i watched a documentary on Netflix. Very cool how it uses that "Gravitational Slingshot" to move around so efficiently.

What data is it collecting actually. Its not a telescope right?

Voyager 2 has a couple of cameras that is uses to send back photos. Some of the more famous pics of the gas giants come from the voyager program. It is also equipped with a couple of radio antennae that it uses to detect errant transmissions along it's trajectory (kinda similar to what the radio telescope arrays do). Plus, Voyager 2 carries the awesomeness that is the "Golden Record." A group of scientists (including Carl Sagan) designed a golden record and encoded it with as much data about earth as they could. Contained on it are greetings in 55 languages, images of earth and the solar system, a collection of sounds/music found on earth, and directions for playing the record.

(voyager 1 and 2 are pretty similar)

Here's one of my favorite shots from Voyager (Earth is the tiny blueish-white dot mid-right)


And here's a link to some more photos:http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/index.html
It's worth noting that some of these photos are incredible given that they were captured with 70s era tech.

<-- false coloring. they assign colors to different wavelengths, it helps identify different elements/compounds
Neptune being mysterious.
Jupiter, **** Yeah!


Last edited by TasteofFlames: 11-12-2012 at 10:44 AM.
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