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Old
11-19-2012, 09:12 AM
  #51
Stories
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Originally Posted by glovesave_35 View Post
AFAIK it is a Chinese/Korean "fusion" dish (you mostly find it in Chinese restaurants here). You can also get jajang-bap 자장밥 (the same black sauce with rice instead of noodles).
Korean style is better than Chinese style, IMO. Then again... I'm Korean-American... so take that for what it's worth. Just be sure to have a lot of water with it. It's extremely salty and you won't realize it until later how much salt you just ate.

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11-19-2012, 07:02 PM
  #52
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Korean style is better than Chinese style, IMO. Then again... I'm Korean-American... so take that for what it's worth. Just be sure to have a lot of water with it. It's extremely salty and you won't realize it until later how much salt you just ate.
It is pretty salty. I can't say I've had it any other way than Korean style it just happens to be sold primarily in Chinese-fusion restaurants.

Have you been to Mara-do in Jeju? Apparently the jajang-myeon on the island is semi-famous; good stuff.

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11-19-2012, 11:47 PM
  #53
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Incredibly timely thread!

I just signed a contract to teach in Daegu, can anybody in here tell me about the teaching experience or that city in particular? I've got two good friends who have been/will be teaching in the same city so we're all pretty pumped about that.

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11-20-2012, 01:07 AM
  #54
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Incredibly timely thread!

I just signed a contract to teach in Daegu, can anybody in here tell me about the teaching experience or that city in particular? I've got two good friends who have been/will be teaching in the same city so we're all pretty pumped about that.
Congrats! I live and teach about an hour east of Daegu. PM me if you have questions I can probably help you out a bit.

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11-20-2012, 06:49 AM
  #55
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Been living here since late February. OP, what exactly do you want to know and what are your interests? Are you interested in seeing as much contemporary culture as possible or are you a fan of history? Are you interested in Buddhism, etc? Also, where are you right now and when you say "free time" do you mean afternoons available or chunks of days at a time? Also, what kind of food do you like? How old are you? What nationality? Military, yes/no? Are you alone or with friends, family?

I highly recommend going to the DMZ, but if you do don't make the mistake I did and only go to Paju. You want to see the JSA as well (where the guards are, etc.). One of the coolest things I've ever seen though was at a lookout tower overlooking the border where you can see a dummy city the North constructed. As far as I know nobody actually lives there and from what I saw that appeared to be the case; kind of post-apocalyptic feeling.

I'm going to just assume you're in your 20's or at least drinking age. If that's the case you should check out Hongdae area of Seoul at night (especially on the weekends). It's near a university and is a pretty happening place with an interesting feel to it. If you want to see something weird go to Itaewon. It's the foreigner capital of Korea and is like stepping into another world (relative to what I'm used to in a smaller city). I haven't personally partied in Itaewon but have heard mixed things about it. I re-read your OP and judging by your username you're military. This may keep you out of certain places, especially in Hongdae, where US military has sort of, shall we say, worn out it's welcome. Some places ID and most do if you look like military. Some places are specifically more western-friendly and thus you will party the night away with people who may be like any other Jack, Dick, or Harry where you're from.

Busan is the second largest city and my personal favorite of the big cities. On the ocean near Japan, the city has a distinctly different feel than Seoul, the feeling of a port city. Beach season is no more but it's still nice to be near and the city is just pretty cool. Party in Haeundae.

So, there's some lowdown on the big cities. I live in the historic capital city of Gyeongju (nearish to Busan). Full of UNESCO heritage sites. Not a big city by any means but Koreans tour here all the time because it's so important to the nation's history. If you like history and/or Buddhism it's well worth it, otherwise I would skip.

There's a lot of good Korean food, more than I care to sit here and list but I'll answer anything I can.

I'm a veteran of this country by no means but I've been here long enough to figure a few things out. If you have any general questions feel free to ask in here. If you have more specific or personal feel free to PM me and I'll try to help out.

Cheers
Pretty interested in the culture, the food, the history. Basically as much as I can take in while I'm here. It's my first time out of the US and I want to utilize the time here and not just sit on my ass.

By free time I'm not quite sure exactly sure how much I'm gonna have until the next few days but right now I can assume I'm mainly gonna have weekends off and I'll be able to take leave eventually to have bigger chunks of days off when I don't have to be back on base for the curfew. And to that yes I'm in the military.

I really want to take the tour of the DMZ. That's one of the first things I want to do since I'm already really close to it. I just need to find one or two more people who would possibly want to go that haven't yet cause were advised not to go out by ourselves.

I wish I was drinking age but I just have a little bit longer to go. I'll be turning 21 while I'm here in May and will be able to get to see the drinking/party side of Korea more for about 6 months(half the time I'm here). I could get away with drinking, so I've heard, but I don't want to chance it and get in any trouble while I'm here especially for something easily avoidable.

I appreciate you taking your time and typing that out. If I have any questions I'll be sure to send you a message if I can't find the answer with a google search.

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Old
11-20-2012, 09:41 AM
  #56
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Pretty interested in the culture, the food, the history. Basically as much as I can take in while I'm here. It's my first time out of the US and I want to utilize the time here and not just sit on my ass.

By free time I'm not quite sure exactly sure how much I'm gonna have until the next few days but right now I can assume I'm mainly gonna have weekends off and I'll be able to take leave eventually to have bigger chunks of days off when I don't have to be back on base for the curfew. And to that yes I'm in the military.

I really want to take the tour of the DMZ. That's one of the first things I want to do since I'm already really close to it. I just need to find one or two more people who would possibly want to go that haven't yet cause were advised not to go out by ourselves.

I wish I was drinking age but I just have a little bit longer to go. I'll be turning 21 while I'm here in May and will be able to get to see the drinking/party side of Korea more for about 6 months(half the time I'm here). I could get away with drinking, so I've heard, but I don't want to chance it and get in any trouble while I'm here especially for something easily avoidable.

I appreciate you taking your time and typing that out. If I have any questions I'll be sure to send you a message if I can't find the answer with a google search.
My main advice is to get out of Seoul if you want to really see Korea. Other than that...if you are 20 right now you're drinking age in Korea. The only time I've ever been carded is going to clubs. If you go to bars, restaurants, etc. nobody will ask you your age. They serve foreigners alcohol. If it's your thing don't abstain because you're not of legal age in America. The laws are different here.

*None of my advice on drinking has anything to do with US Military. If they have different rules then that's up to you. I'm just saying you're legal age to drink here by a few years.

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11-21-2012, 12:30 PM
  #57
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Kimchi is delicious, get it at the asian market here all the time.
Just about to crack this box of deliciousness open.


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11-21-2012, 02:30 PM
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Lived in Seoul for more than half of my life and it was directly opposite for me. Maybe it's because I'm comparing them from people form West Coast (Seattle and Vancouver mostly) but they often push you, never say sorry after they bump into you, things like that.
When people push you, they are not being rude, it's part of the culture. Personal space isn't the same in Asia. Why would they say sorry if in their mind there is nothing wrong in pushing? You would have a hard time in Japan.

I still hate ajummas pushing everyone in the subway though, haha.

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Old
11-22-2012, 01:44 AM
  #59
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When people push you, they are not being rude, it's part of the culture. Personal space isn't the same in Asia. Why would they say sorry if in their mind there is nothing wrong in pushing? You would have a hard time in Japan.

I still hate ajummas pushing everyone in the subway though, haha.
I ****ing hate that about Korea. And they might be nice to foreigners (especially white people).

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Old
11-22-2012, 02:13 AM
  #60
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Originally Posted by Boardish View Post
When people push you, they are not being rude, it's part of the culture. Personal space isn't the same in Asia. Why would they say sorry if in their mind there is nothing wrong in pushing? You would have a hard time in Japan.

I still hate ajummas pushing everyone in the subway though, haha.
Totally depends on context for me. If I'm at home in Texas and someone bumps into me they will usually apologize. On the street or subway in Seoul or somewhere like that I feel no ownership of the space more than a few inches in front of my face; it's just not your property when you leave your home.

The ajummas pushing people out of the way is somewhere between absurdly hilarious and annoying for me.

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11-22-2012, 02:25 AM
  #61
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Just about to crack this box of deliciousness open.

I'm Asian, and i'm not gonna lie, I prefer Mr. Noodles.

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Old
11-22-2012, 07:20 AM
  #62
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Originally Posted by glovesave_35 View Post
My main advice is to get out of Seoul if you want to really see Korea. Other than that...if you are 20 right now you're drinking age in Korea. The only time I've ever been carded is going to clubs. If you go to bars, restaurants, etc. nobody will ask you your age. They serve foreigners alcohol. If it's your thing don't abstain because you're not of legal age in America. The laws are different here.

*None of my advice on drinking has anything to do with US Military. If they have different rules then that's up to you. I'm just saying you're legal age to drink here by a few years.
Unfortunately the drinking age for me is still 21. But soon enough in a few months I will be there.

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Old
11-22-2012, 09:45 AM
  #63
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Originally Posted by glovesave_35 View Post
Totally depends on context for me. If I'm at home in Texas and someone bumps into me they will usually apologize. On the street or subway in Seoul or somewhere like that I feel no ownership of the space more than a few inches in front of my face; it's just not your property when you leave your home.

The ajummas pushing people out of the way is somewhere between absurdly hilarious and annoying for me.
Completely agree with this. Personal space is the one annoyance you'll find with Korean people IMO.

I've had countless other experiences that outweigh these annoyances:

-Got locked out of my apartment one night when I came back from the bar really late. Was half asleep in the stairwell when my neighbour opened up her door and let me sleep on her couch. This was a month after I moved in too, so it isn't like she really knew me or had seen me more than a time or two.

-Once got overcharged by 10 cents at a bakery. A couple minutes later the owner came flying down the street and gave me the dime that he owed me.

-Was travelling to a National Park by myself and a man started chatting with me on the bus and eventually invited me out to dinner with him and his wife.

-Was pissing rain and I didn't have an umbrella and a man brought me in under his umbrella.

-Lost my wallet in a cab outside a supermarket and the manager of the supermarket spent an hour with me deciphering what was wrong, calling cab companies and finally the police.

-Was riding the Seoul Subway for the first time, map in hand, and 3 people on 3 different subway cars came up to me and asked if I needed any help.

So basically, you'll get pushed a time or two on the subway or you'll have a few people cut you in line now and then, but experiences like these will certainly make up for it.

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