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Newly sharpened skates are an issue

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Old
12-03-2012, 08:30 AM
  #1
nystromshairstylist
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Newly sharpened skates are an issue

I am 5-10.5" and weigh 168 lbs (just lost 36 pounds ) and have have skated/played for 2.5 years.

The issue is that after I get my skates sharpened, I have to grind down the blades for about 20 minutes by side-scraping them on the ice so that I can easily hockey stop. When I try to hockey stop on either side, the back foot "chucks" on the ice and does not flow smoothly like the leading skate.

I originally started with a 7/16" cut and now use a 9/16th" but think I should try a 5/8" or even flatter so that the skates are comfortable right after a sharpening. I've read that there should not be an adjustment period needed after they are sharpened. I have to admit that I might be waiting too long between sharpenings, but it is this initial discomfort period that I am trying to avoid.

Am I using too deep a cut and should go flatter to say, the 5/8", or could it be my technique? I realize without video this will be a guess but I was hoping to gain some thoughtful insights.

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12-03-2012, 08:33 AM
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AIREAYE
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You shouldn't need to do that to 'dull' the blades. Try the 5/8ths and if that's still a problem, check your steel for levelness, maybe your holders too and even your technique if it comes to it.

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12-03-2012, 08:39 AM
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Jarick
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Yes the typical approach is to go with a flatter hollow. I found most of my skate sharpening issues went away when I went to FBV sharpenings, so you may want to try that as well.

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12-03-2012, 09:12 AM
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The Tikkanen
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I second the FBV cut but if that's not available I'd go with the standard 1/2 cut and work your way back towards 7/16 to find where you need to be. If you can't slide stop or have to dull your blades you're not getting the right cut, good way to get hurt too.

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12-03-2012, 09:19 AM
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izzy3
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FBV +1

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12-03-2012, 09:21 AM
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Propane Nightmares
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Getting a flatter grind is just the easy option to fix a personal problem. You may want to look at your technique, good skaters can don't have problems even with very sharp grinds.

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12-03-2012, 09:41 AM
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There's an even more obvious answer here than the ones already discussed.

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12-03-2012, 10:00 AM
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Jarick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats View Post
Getting a flatter grind is just the easy option to fix a personal problem. You may want to look at your technique, good skaters can don't have problems even with very sharp grinds.
While that may be true, not everyone has the talent, time, and coaching to become very good skaters. I'd say it's better to adjust your equipment to your skills and enjoy your time on the ice.

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12-03-2012, 11:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats View Post
Getting a flatter grind is just the easy option to fix a personal problem. You may want to look at your technique, good skaters can don't have problems even with very sharp grinds.
Most good skaters are skating on a flatter hollow, 1/2" or lower.

To OP, the hollow on your skates is too deep. Try 5/8". Don't worry about an adjustment period, once you go out and skate for 5-10 minutes you will know if you like it or not.

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12-03-2012, 11:21 AM
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Pog Form
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I used to always dread getting my skates sharpened until a few years ago when I discovered the glory of different hollows. It's a great feeling getting a fresh grind and knowing you'll be at your best as soon as you step on the ice. I'm all the way up to 3/4" and loving it.

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Old
12-03-2012, 11:27 AM
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mgd150
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I'd try the 5/8 cut.

Also, I had some issues with the back foot chattering when trying to hockey stop, I fixed it by trying to put more weight on the middle-front of the foot rather than the back of the foot.

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12-03-2012, 11:53 AM
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TieClark
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Like others have said, sounds like you're using a radius too narrow for you. Go to 5/8 of a inch and see if it's any better (it almost certainly should be with what you described).

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12-03-2012, 12:15 PM
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Trl3789
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I know this is me being uniformed, but can someone explain to me why getting the FBV would help this situation? I've thought about getting FBV but don't understand it enough to see the benefit of getting it done.

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12-03-2012, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forbs02 View Post
Most good skaters are skating on a flatter hollow, 1/2" or lower.
No they're not, it's down to personal preference and the position you play.

When I was a bad skater I had problems stopping even after getting hollow grinds, because I was a bad skater. As time went on I improved and stopping was no longer a problem and I was comfortable getting sharper grinds. I get a 7/16 now and that's perfect for the first time I get on the ice, I could easily get a 3/8 if I wanted to.

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12-03-2012, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trl3789 View Post
I know this is me being uniformed, but can someone explain to me why getting the FBV would help this situation? I've thought about getting FBV but don't understand it enough to see the benefit of getting it done.
With traditional sharpening, the angle of the edges is tied to the hollow, but with FBV, you can independently adjust the angle of the edges as well as the "height" of the edges.

What that means is that when you are skating on a traditional hollow, you have to compromise between friction (bite) and glide. Too deep and it constantly digs into the ice and cuts down your glide. Too flat and you won't dig into the ice as much on your edges.

With FBV you figure out what you like with the height and angle of the edges, which for me makes the biggest difference when leaning on the edges. It feels easier to control my edges at different lean angles and my sharpenings feel more consistent and seem to last longer.

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12-03-2012, 12:45 PM
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The conditions of the ice can be a factor. If you're skating on cold, hard ice, sharp blades are fine. If you're on soft summer time ice, sometimes your skates will feel too sharp.

Assuming good ice, try doing some hard turns (the kind where you can hear your skates cutting the ice) in warm ups to take dull that initial bite. If that's not enough, stand on the blue line, take a few hard strides left, stop hard, then do the same to your right, repeat as necessary. That will dull the edge down, while giving you some crossover/acceleration practice.

Also, FYI. When you're playing hockey, it's just called stopping.

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12-03-2012, 12:59 PM
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forbs02
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats View Post
No they're not, it's down to personal preference and the position you play.

When I was a bad skater I had problems stopping even after getting hollow grinds, because I was a bad skater. As time went on I improved and stopping was no longer a problem and I was comfortable getting sharper grinds. I get a 7/16 now and that's perfect for the first time I get on the ice, I could easily get a 3/8 if I wanted to.
There are benefits to skating on a shallower hollow: more glide, an edge that will last longer, less fatigue. A deep hollow is a crutch for a poor skater. It allows a skater to get bite without using proper technique. Most collegiate/pro skaters are in 1/2, 5/8, or 3/4". You will occasionally get a player in 7/16, but with the exception of goalies, hardly anyone uses 3/8".

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12-03-2012, 01:08 PM
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Propane Nightmares
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forbs02 View Post
There are benefits to skating on a shallower hollow: more glide, an edge that will last longer, less fatigue. A deep hollow is a crutch for a poor skater. It allows a skater to get bite without using proper technique. Most collegiate/pro skaters are in 1/2, 5/8, or 3/4". You will occasionally get a player in 7/16, but with the exception of goalies, hardly anyone uses 3/8".
No, it's a trade off between speed and turning ability, it's personal preference. You also have to factor the type of ice into account, whether it is hard or soft.

In the NHL, most guys get a 1/2 but that's only because they can get them done for them by the equipment manager before every game. Lower level pro players will get them done less often so will go for a sharper grind to make it last longer.


Last edited by Propane Nightmares: 12-03-2012 at 01:28 PM.
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12-03-2012, 01:28 PM
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Quote:
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While that may be true, not everyone has the talent, time, and coaching to become very good skaters. I'd say it's better to adjust your equipment to your skills and enjoy your time on the ice.
Totally agree with Jarick here. Find that sweet spot that works for your skill and comfort level. For me, 5/8 is perfect with the just the right amount of bite for the ice I skate on. I never fear a new edge.

Also, not all shops are created equal. Find one you like with a good reputation, stick with it, and you will get consistent results.

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12-03-2012, 01:35 PM
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Jive Time
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I forgot to add this. I'm pretty sure someone posted this a while back but it's interesting to note:

Pittsburgh Penguins Skate Cut Chart

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12-03-2012, 01:35 PM
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That was another part of it. With regular sharpenings, even at the same shop it was somewhat inconsistent depending on who did it. With FBV, it seems much more consistent. I've only had two "bad" sharpenings with FBV the last few years. Many more than that with regular sharpenings.

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12-03-2012, 01:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Time View Post
I forgot to add this. I'm pretty sure someone posted this a while back but it's interesting to note:

Pittsburgh Penguins Skate Cut Chart
My favorite part of that chart was Chris Bourque's 263mm runners. Tiny skates (for the NHL)!

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12-03-2012, 01:38 PM
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Propane Nightmares
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Time View Post
I forgot to add this. I'm pretty sure someone posted this a while back but it's interesting to note:

Pittsburgh Penguins Skate Cut Chart
Interesting that Fleury gets a 3/4 while the other goalies get a 3/8

I also found this video with the Nashville Predators' equipment manager talking about skate sharpening http://video.predators.nhl.com/video...sole?id=101671

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12-03-2012, 01:53 PM
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I just switched to FBV a couple of sharpenings ago. I found that the glide is much better with FBV than it was with traditional.

The previous time I tried 5/8, but didn't feel that it was quite enough bite. On the FBV I got 100/50 the first time but yesterday it was a different shop and they didn't have the same system, so instead of 100/50 they said it was equivalent to a 7? The sharpening was fine, a little chattery at first on stops but that went away fairly quickly.

I was told by a teammate that FBV would wear down the blades faster on cheaper skates. The guy in the pro shop said it really wasn't any difference between traditional and FBV as far as wearing down the blades. Has anyone else heard that it does?

It really is a matter of preference. If you're not a great skater, you can certainly work on skating - but if having a different radius makes a difference, why not try it?

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12-03-2012, 02:04 PM
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I'm a meh skater...

And I absolutely HATE sharp skates...

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