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Old
11-18-2012, 12:46 AM
  #151
Dutch Frost
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In HS and College I was a huge Metal fan.. i then went strictly with classic rock. Now I am 33 and I listen to alot of folk music now, I have been really loving The Head and The Heart, The Lumineers, David Gray, Jack Johnson etc

When I was 15 I was listening to Megadeth's Rust in Peace now I am listening to Sigur Ros lol

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11-28-2012, 09:23 PM
  #152
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Not the biggest Metallica fan but I love For Whom the Bell Tolls and Fade To Black.

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11-28-2012, 09:47 PM
  #153
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In HS and College I was a huge Metal fan.. i then went strictly with classic rock. Now I am 33 and I listen to alot of folk music now, I have been really loving The Head and The Heart, The Lumineers, David Gray, Jack Johnson etc

When I was 15 I was listening to Megadeth's Rust in Peace now I am listening to Sigur Ros lol
Jack Johnson, David Grey and The Lumineers are all solid

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11-28-2012, 10:35 PM
  #154
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Ozzfest 2013 Slipknot, Tool, Stone Sour......(Black Sabbath, Deftones, Slash)

If only it wasn't in Japan, I'd fly anywhere in North America for that. I've always wanted to see Maynard James Keenan live. Guy is a musical genius.

Please tell me we have some Tool fans on this board besides "Forty-Six & 2"

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11-29-2012, 12:11 AM
  #155
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Just saw Hoodie Allen in NYC. LI kid with a lot of talent. Put on a great show.

Up next is Coldplay at Barclays on Dec 30.

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11-29-2012, 07:46 AM
  #156
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Finally getting a little more settled on this backpacking adventure......went to a club in the Wedding area of Berlin....this place is like an old factory or something called Staatbad.....tunnels and dj's and the longest queue for coatcheck.....didn't even know why.

Then you get into this one room and it's dj's at the deep end of an empty swimming pool with a dance area from the front up to the shallow end with a walkway rounding the space above it. I suddenly realized I recognized the damned dj. It was freaking Lindstrom. (If anyone else here listens to any current quality non-cliché electronica, you may know the name.)

Party went until like 10am. These Berliners don't stop. Awesome show.

In Berlin for another 4 days and then I'm hitting up my buddies in Bielefeld (western Germany), doing some audio mastering for them and I should have a gig there next week.

With the exception of my supposed-to-be-unlocked iPhone being a pain in the ass (no pocket translator or google maps, the traveler's two best friends in a new place,) the trip is starting to level out to good.

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11-29-2012, 08:01 AM
  #157
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Finally getting a little more settled on this backpacking adventure......went to a club in the Wedding area of Berlin....this place is like an old factory or something called Staatbad.....tunnels and dj's and the longest queue for coatcheck.....didn't even know why.

Then you get into this one room and it's dj's at the deep end of an empty swimming pool with a dance area from the front up to the shallow end with a walkway rounding the space above it. I suddenly realized I recognized the damned dj. It was freaking Lindstrom. (If anyone else here listens to any current quality non-cliché electronica, you may know the name.)

Party went until like 10am. These Berliners don't stop. Awesome show.

In Berlin for another 4 days and then I'm hitting up my buddies in Bielefeld (western Germany), doing some audio mastering for them and I should have a gig there next week.

With the exception of my supposed-to-be-unlocked iPhone being a pain in the ass (no pocket translator or google maps, the traveler's two best friends in a new place,) the trip is starting to level out to good.
Awesome! I hope the rest of the trip is as good as what you've experienced so far.

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12-04-2012, 06:14 AM
  #158
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Awesome! I hope the rest of the trip is as good as what you've experienced so far.
Thanks much. ....been a fun and interesting trip so far, though interspersed with a little of the old "hurry up & wait." My label-mate buddy in western Germany is on the road with his day job, so I'm right back at the hostel..........so it's a case of "hurry up and wait" until I can either get a freelance visa figured out (much more potential for good audio work here) or decide that I'm just on holiday and 'go with it.'

I hate making decisions sometimes.

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12-07-2012, 07:23 AM
  #159
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Anyone reading or read the Pete Townshend memoir? A couple of observations -

(i) it's amazing how little he has to say about the construction of particular songs and how much he has to say about the construction of albums as a whole, and with the technical production of collections of songs. I suppose he left the details of working out the songs to his bandmates, which explains why his solo stuff is pretty weak. He's certainly no Paul McCartney.

(ii) He had this concept of himself as a person divided between his family life and his life as a self-obsessed drunk musician. When you read his own account of his life, it becomes pretty clear that his felt pull to his family was pretty much a vanity.

(iii) I've never ready an autobiography where the author makes himself out to seem like such an awful person. Clearly his honesty is his strength.

Cheers,

Dan-o

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12-07-2012, 08:05 AM
  #160
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Dude I listen to Sigur Ros (There Iceland's Radiohead before Radiohead went to crap) People think I am weird because I listen to a band that speaks no English.
Heck, they rarely even sing in Icelandic. Jónsi Birgisson's favorite singing practices revolve around gushing out and falsettoing sounds inspired by the musical accompaniment, or something like that...

Here's even an attempt to, uhh, 'define' it...
>>>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigur_R%C3%B3s
Vonlenska

Vonlenska is the non-literal language that forms the unintelligible lyrics sung by the band,[41] Jónsi in particular. It is also commonly known by the English translation of its name, Hopelandic. It takes its name from "Von", a song on Sigur Rós’s debut album Von where it was first used.

Vonlenska has no fixed syntax and differs from constructed languages that can be used for communication. It focuses entirely on the sounds of language; lacking grammar, meaning, and even distinct words. Instead, it consists of emotive non-lexical vocables and phonemes; in effect, Vonlenska uses the melodic and rhythmic elements of singing without the conceptual content of language. In this way, it is similar to the use of scat singing in vocal jazz. The band's website describes it as "a form of gibberish vocals that fits to the music";[42] it is similar in concept to the 'nonsense' language often used by Cocteau Twins singer Elizabeth Fraser in the 1980s and 1990s. Most of the syllable strings sung by Jónsi are repeated many times throughout each song, and in the case of ( ), throughout the whole album.
<<<

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12-07-2012, 08:11 AM
  #161
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Have a question for some of our Canadian contributors.

Over here, Arcade Fire is pretty doggone big. They've had some huge success over the past 5+ years, particularly in Northern Europe.

Are they a band that is well-known in Canada, much less considered fairly mainstream, at least with respect to getting air time?

The singer and his brother are from the States (Texas, I believe), but the band is based in Montreal and Win Butler's wife, also one of the female singers, is French Canadian.

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12-07-2012, 08:36 AM
  #162
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Originally Posted by Dan-o16 View Post
Anyone reading or read the Pete Townshend memoir? A couple of observations -

(i) it's amazing how little he has to say about the construction of particular songs and how much he has to say about the construction of albums as a whole, and with the technical production of collections of songs. I suppose he left the details of working out the songs to his bandmates, which explains why his solo stuff is pretty weak. He's certainly no Paul McCartney.

(ii) He had this concept of himself as a person divided between his family life and his life as a self-obsessed drunk musician. When you read his own account of his life, it becomes pretty clear that his felt pull to his family was pretty much a vanity.

(iii) I've never ready an autobiography where the author makes himself out to seem like such an awful person. Clearly his honesty is his strength.

Cheers,

Dan-o
I haven't picked up the Townshend book yet, but as a massive Who fan, I most certainly will at some point. But from what I know of the man and how the book was developed, I think I can respond to your points.

i)Post Tommy, Townshend was more concerned with making albums that work as concepts or at least have a prevailing theme as opposed to just writing stand-alone songs. Who's Next was supposed to be a concepual piece called Lifehouse, Quadrophenia is another rock opera, majority of the tracks on The Who By Numbers all have a common theme, etc. Even in his solo career, he's presented pieces like The Iron Man and Psychoderelict which are also conceptual. So, it makes sense to me that he would talk about the bigger picture (meaning albums) as opposed to smaller pieces (meaning songs). The book was also scaled down from the original manuscript which was well over a thousand pages, so I'm sure a lot of things had to be glazed over in order to reduce it's size to about half.

As far as letting the rest of the Who work out the details of the individual songs, while there's no denying that the rest of the band's ability as individual musicians and their combined chemistry made them bigger and better than Pete could ever be on his own, he was clearly the mastermind behind everything. Part of Pete's writing process was to present very elaborate demos with fully realized songs to the band when they were about to work on new material. If you ever get the chance tp hear any of these, you'd be surprised at how complete they sound, as if they were outtakes of the band in the studio as opposed to Pete working on his own. These demos were released in the 80's and 90's under the titles of Scoop, Another Scoop, and Scoop 3 and spawned a lot of discussion amongst Who fans as to whether the rest of the band influenced Townshend's playing on these demos or whether Pete's playing on the demos influenced the rest of the band! I mean, if you're not a die-hard fan, these collections may not be of interest. But they are still an interesting look into the man's writing process.

That he's no Paul McCartney goes without saying, but let's face it, most artists have a certain amount of good years in them and after that, their work just begins to pale in comparison to to their prime. Hell, even a good portion of McCartney's post Beatles career is not very good! I'd argue that Pete lost his touch even before the Who broke up. It could just be the absence of Keith Moon, but I'm not a huge fan of those last two Who albums (Face Dances, and It's Hard). Still, that's an impressive 14 year run.

ii)He's most definitely torn between what he sees has his purpose in life and his duty (artist) and the trappings of a normal man (family). His work ethic is tremendous, he's extrememly dedicated to his trade, and feels totally compelled to create. There's undoubtedly a part of him that views his family as a diversion that has been keeping him from what he believes he's on this planet to do, but I have no doubt that he genuinely loves and is devoted to them.

iii)His honesty has always been a strength in most cases, but he's also said things that he's regretted because of whatever emotional state he was in at that particular time. Sure, these were honest feelings at the time, but his emotions skewed the reality of a lot of situations and he's had to make corrections over the years. But, he has always been consistent on how awful both he and his bandmates are as people. There are very few saints in this world, but I also don't think most people would be able to point out their own shortcomings like he does. And I'm not talking about superficial things like leaving the toilet seat up, I'm talking about being frank about the dark thoughts that we're all prone to have from time to time and those occasions where we actually carry them out.

For what it's worth, I've heard that the audiobook version of the memoir is amazing. Pete reads his own words, provides almost spot on impressions of others dialogue, and really gets the mood of certain stories across whether it be comedic or dramatic. If you wind up liking the book a lot, you might wanna check that out too.

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12-07-2012, 09:09 AM
  #163
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ii)He's most definitely torn between what he sees has his purpose in life and his duty (artist) and the trappings of a normal man (family). His work ethic is tremendous, he's extrememly dedicated to his trade, and feels totally compelled to create. There's undoubtedly a part of him that views his family as a diversion that has been keeping him from what he believes he's on this planet to do, but I have no doubt that he genuinely loves and is devoted to them.
I'll take your word on everything else, but I'm going to push back on this. It's one thing if he's just another Gauguin type, for whom the drive to make art leaves no attention available for anything or anyone else. I get that. It's not the choice I'd make, but I understand it. (The same was true of my previous profession, academic philosophy. It was so all-consuming that immersion in it created a immense distance in relationships. Great academic philosophers actually live like rock stars.)

But what gets me, and you'd have to read the book to get this, is how his expressions of regret for being a missing husband/dad are at the same time perfunctory and melodramatic. They're the only places in the book where I get the feeling that he's selling something.

Cheers,

Dan-o

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12-07-2012, 09:27 AM
  #164
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Have a question for some of our Canadian contributors.

Over here, Arcade Fire is pretty doggone big. They've had some huge success over the past 5+ years, particularly in Northern Europe.

Are they a band that is well-known in Canada, much less considered fairly mainstream, at least with respect to getting air time?

The singer and his brother are from the States (Texas, I believe), but the band is based in Montreal and Win Butler's wife, also one of the female singers, is French Canadian.
I can't tell you if they're big in Canada, but they were certainly big in the US. However, from my experience, bands like that can just explode in Germany in ways they won't in the US/Canada. I remember one winter I was in Germany (3-4 years ago?), and the radio basically alternated between Coldplay and the Killers. I found it a bit ridiculous.

Also, I don't think that I'm alone in feeling pretty ambivalent about the albums after Funeral. I liked the way they sounded like an orchestral ensemble on stage in that album, complete with noise and off-key notes. Neighborhood #2 (Laika) is one of my all-time favorite songs. Nothing quite like it since.

Cheers,

Dan-o

PS A tangent relating to Laika. Turns out that Arcade Fire is (at least) the 2nd Canadian band that wrote a song inspired by the space-faring dog. The other was written by Jian Ghomeshi in Moxy Fruvous. Back in college Moxy Fruvous played at our school, I was a fan, and I had the honor of smoking up the band, including Jian Ghomeshi, who now is on NPR and interviews prime ministers. Heh.

PPS That reminds me of another silly story. I went to a Moxy Fruvous show at The Bottom Line. You had to be 21 OR, it turns out, solemnly swear to Allan Pepper that you wouldn't order alcohol. I thought that was awesome how the owner of a legendary establishment like that still treated young people like people (our word was good enough).


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12-07-2012, 10:06 AM
  #165
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I'll take your word on everything else, but I'm going to push back on this. It's one thing if he's just another Gauguin type, for whom the drive to make art leaves no attention available for anything or anyone else. I get that. It's not the choice I'd make, but I understand it. (The same was true of my previous profession, academic philosophy. It was so all-consuming that immersion in it created a immense distance in relationships. Great academic philosophers actually live like rock stars.)

But what gets me, and you'd have to read the book to get this, is how his expressions of regret for being a missing husband/dad are at the same time perfunctory and melodramatic. They're the only places in the book where I get the feeling that he's selling something.

Cheers,

Dan-o
Fair enough. Like you said, I guess I'll have to read what he wrote and the tone in which he wrote it in to get what you mean. I'll get back to you...

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12-08-2012, 07:38 AM
  #166
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I can't tell you if they're big in Canada, but they were certainly big in the US. However, from my experience, bands like that can just explode in Germany in ways they won't in the US/Canada. I remember one winter I was in Germany (3-4 years ago?), and the radio basically alternated between Coldplay and the Killers. I found it a bit ridiculous.

Also, I don't think that I'm alone in feeling pretty ambivalent about the albums after Funeral. I liked the way they sounded like an orchestral ensemble on stage in that album, complete with noise and off-key notes. Neighborhood #2 (Laika) is one of my all-time favorite songs. Nothing quite like it since.

Cheers,

Dan-o
Thanks Dan-o!

Yep, I've heard a number of folks mention that Funeral is their favorite, most particularly a Montreal native who was a teammate of mine who said several songs on that album are, for him, the pure description of nights out on the town in a snowy winter. I think some of the music magazines I've read still refer to it as their best album.

Then again, that's often the case with a band like this that arrives on the scene with an album that captivates and becomes a big indie hit, getting rave reviews in the process. I'd still say that the first albums by bands like Kings of Leon and the Killers were clearly their best, especially for what they offered in the moment and the wave they were part of, which might have gained more attention here than Stateside for that matter, especially in KofL's case.

I first discovered AF via 'Black Mirror', which immediately captivated me. Sure, it contains a level of naivity and pomp, but the build-up and the orchestral phase that sets in after the second "Une, deux, trois, une miroire noire", driven by the snare (I believe) beat just had me clicking on the repeat button regularly. Neon Bible became my album of the hour and thus, remains the most important piece they've created for me personally.

This said, I didn't care much for The Suburbs at first, but as time has gone by I've really come to appreciate it. I think from a technical standpoint, it's simply their best work and shows a certain maturity without completely abondoning their calling card.

Some of the last few concerts I've been to here were Kasabian, Doves (both UK), Interpol (NYC) and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (San Fran). How well-known might bands like these be stateside, or up in the NYC area at the nowadays?

PS) Your time in Germany: If that was when 'Human' was out, then you are sooooo right. They KILLED that song on the radio here, one I surely didn't care for in the least to begin with. But the 'dancefloor' direction offered by that song clearly allowed it to be a mainstreamer hereabouts.

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12-08-2012, 07:51 AM
  #167
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Have a question for some of our Canadian contributors.

Over here, Arcade Fire is pretty doggone big. They've had some huge success over the past 5+ years, particularly in Northern Europe.

Are they a band that is well-known in Canada, much less considered fairly mainstream, at least with respect to getting air time?

The singer and his brother are from the States (Texas, I believe), but the band is based in Montreal and Win Butler's wife, also one of the female singers, is French Canadian.
I don't know if they are popular in the rest of Canada, but I can tell you that they are very popular in the province of Quebec, especially in Montreal where I live.
And Yes, you can hear their music on the radio.

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12-08-2012, 01:54 PM
  #168
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Arcade Fire are pretty mainstream here in the US.

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12-10-2012, 11:25 PM
  #169
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Ozzfest 2013 Slipknot, Tool, Stone Sour......(Black Sabbath, Deftones, Slash)

If only it wasn't in Japan, I'd fly anywhere in North America for that. I've always wanted to see Maynard James Keenan live. Guy is a musical genius.

Please tell me we have some Tool fans on this board besides "Forty-Six & 2"
I saw Tool at Ozzfest in the mid-late 90s.

,
Mitch

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12-11-2012, 07:00 AM
  #170
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PS) Your time in Germany: If that was when 'Human' was out, then you are sooooo right. They KILLED that song on the radio here, one I surely didn't care for in the least to begin with. But the 'dancefloor' direction offered by that song clearly allowed it to be a mainstreamer hereabouts.
That was it. The tripartite German obsession that I observed: (i) that song, (ii) Coldplay, (iii) Twilight. In men.

Cheers,

Dan-o

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07-09-2013, 08:54 PM
  #171
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Extra tickets available for Bob Dylan, Wilco, Beck and Ryan Bingham at Jones Beach Sat Jul 27. 4 seats in 14R and 2 in 10R. Face value (including tm fees) = $74 each. PM me if interested.

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