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What's the best post secondary program?

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Old
12-07-2012, 10:55 AM
  #51
guest1467
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Originally Posted by WhipNash27 View Post
Honestly, these days the best jobs are "hourly" wage jobs. Electrician, cop, firefighter, plumber, or something. Why? Because corporations will require you to work as many hours as they want you to and you won't get paid an extra penny. You can work 40 hours or 60 hours and you'll get paid the same. It's quite common to work a corporate job and work 10+ hour days regularly. Meanwhile if you have an hourly job, anything above your 40 hours gets you time and a half. Those companies typically want to kick your ass out the door anything above 40 unless they have no choice.
What is this? I don't even....

The best jobs have always been salaried jobs.

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12-07-2012, 12:06 PM
  #52
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Salaried jobs are generally better paying jobs, and physically they tend to be less demanding that hourly jobs.

But I think he's just pointing out that hourly jobs tend to have fairer labour practices. And to some people being expected to work 60+ hours/week isn't worth the increase in pay.

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Old
12-07-2012, 12:11 PM
  #53
WhipNash27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 View Post
What is this? I don't even....

The best jobs have always been salaried jobs.
Yes, typically salaried jobs pay better, but if you got to choose between two jobs:

1. 73K salaried position
2. $35/hr hourly position

Which would you take? I'd take the $35/hr job without blinking.

Also there are plenty of non-salary jobs that make tons of money. There are plenty of electricians out there who make $100K+ easily. I know cops who within a few years will be making close to 100K as well (plus OT).

It depends on what you categorize as best. If you value not having to do manual labor, then yes, you won't find much that will pay well that's not salaried. If you don't mind manual labor, there are plenty of high paying jobs that aren't salaried and those jobs will pay you extra for working more than your typical 40 hour week unlike salaried jobs.

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12-07-2012, 12:40 PM
  #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusk Soldier View Post
Salaried jobs are generally better paying jobs, and physically they tend to be less demanding that hourly jobs.

But I think he's just pointing out that hourly jobs tend to have fairer labour practices. And to some people being expected to work 60+ hours/week isn't worth the increase in pay.
This makes no sense. Salaried jobs typically are accompanied by employment contracts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WhipNash27 View Post
Yes, typically salaried jobs pay better, but if you got to choose between two jobs:

1. 73K salaried position
2. $35/hr hourly position

Which would you take? I'd take the $35/hr job without blinking.

Also there are plenty of non-salary jobs that make tons of money. There are plenty of electricians out there who make $100K+ easily. I know cops who within a few years will be making close to 100K as well (plus OT).

It depends on what you categorize as best. If you value not having to do manual labor, then yes, you won't find much that will pay well that's not salaried. If you don't mind manual labor, there are plenty of high paying jobs that aren't salaried and those jobs will pay you extra for working more than your typical 40 hour week unlike salaried jobs.
I categorize best as something that has the highest of these variables: job security, pay, and benefits.

A salaried worker will typically have higher outcomes in every category. Because of employment contracts, their job is often more protected. Because salaried jobs are in the professional and tertiary sector, pay is often higher. Salaried workers have access to much greater benefits than wage earners through stock options, personal expense accounts, pension plans, and better dental/health benefits.

I'll take the salary option almost every time. Furthermore, because of contracts, you get the benefit of negotiating the terms yourself. If you are an hourly wage worker, who is not in a union, you are on the lowest rung of employment in any job sector.

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12-07-2012, 10:02 PM
  #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 View Post
This makes no sense. Salaried jobs typically are accompanied by employment contracts.



I categorize best as something that has the highest of these variables: job security, pay, and benefits.

A salaried worker will typically have higher outcomes in every category. Because of employment contracts, their job is often more protected. Because salaried jobs are in the professional and tertiary sector, pay is often higher. Salaried workers have access to much greater benefits than wage earners through stock options, personal expense accounts, pension plans, and better dental/health benefits.

I'll take the salary option almost every time. Furthermore, because of contracts, you get the benefit of negotiating the terms yourself. If you are an hourly wage worker, who is not in a union, you are on the lowest rung of employment in any job sector.
Lol, what an absolutely asinine comment to make. You're clueless my friend. I'm salaried with overtime payed at double my wage. They calculate OT on an hourly basis. Some of my former co-workers left the company I'm with to go work "low rung" non union hourly jobs @ anywhere between $59-$120+. Their benefits are outstanding.

Take a close buddy of mine who left.

He get's $1500 a month towards his mortgage for 3 years.
Full benefits
Stock Options
RRSP matching @ 12%
6% shift bonuses
shift premiums (between $1.50-$3 an hour extra)
Semi-annual bonuses, 9% minimum up to 15% of his GROSS salary.
And much more that I'm forgetting.

My friend left our company even though he was on the verge of a nice promotion to the tune of $225k+ per year. Obviously not every job is like this, but man your ignorance is ridiculous. A lot of these hourly job workers will make 10 times of your wage when you graduate with that Poli-sci degree.

I've read your posts buddah, and I can tell you're a smart guy, but some of the crap that you spew is as laughable as it is ridiculous.

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Old
12-07-2012, 10:48 PM
  #56
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Any engineering but learn programming in spare time.

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12-07-2012, 11:54 PM
  #57
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Blah Blah Blah


Last edited by guest1467: 12-08-2012 at 12:20 AM.
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Old
12-08-2012, 02:51 PM
  #58
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Technically, M.D. is an undergraduate degree too so that would be the best answer, but of course, med school is way too competitive (especially in Canada).

Pharmacy. (but I may be biased)

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Old
12-12-2012, 05:19 AM
  #59
Astoria
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I had thought about getting an HR degree.... Until I discovered that an HR degree from an American university is pretty much worthless in Canada (which is where I'm hoping to move to).

So now I've decided to obtain an Accounting degree which seems to be pretty universal (at least from what I have been told).

And if anyone has any advice or insight, well, that would be much appreciated. ; )

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12-12-2012, 08:37 AM
  #60
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You're not approaching it in a stupid way, as others seem to think. It is logical to look at all your options and weigh them based on many criteria, the most important of which are 1) Whether you would enjoy it and 2) whether it will pay well when you get done. The two are not mutually exclusive, and honestly at this point in your life you probably don't know exactly what you like doing anyway.

However, there are some ways to make a good guess. Engineering is one of the top fields for getting a good job with a bachelor's degree, but you will need to be good at (and enjoy) math and science in order to get through the program. I can't speak too much for most of the other majors. I know that with any medical field you will need to be good at and enjoy biology and memorization, but most of those aren't four-year programs anyway.

Unless you or your parents are already rich, it simply doesn't make financial sense to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a degree that you enjoy but will not get you a good job after you're done. Remember, you can always (nay, should) have hobbies during and after school.

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12-12-2012, 08:58 AM
  #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 View Post
This makes no sense. Salaried jobs typically are accompanied by employment contracts.



I categorize best as something that has the highest of these variables: job security, pay, and benefits.

A salaried worker will typically have higher outcomes in every category. Because of employment contracts, their job is often more protected. Because salaried jobs are in the professional and tertiary sector, pay is often higher. Salaried workers have access to much greater benefits than wage earners through stock options, personal expense accounts, pension plans, and better dental/health benefits.

I'll take the salary option almost every time. Furthermore, because of contracts, you get the benefit of negotiating the terms yourself. If you are an hourly wage worker, who is not in a union, you are on the lowest rung of employment in any job sector.
Sorry to burst your bubble, but most salaried employees don't get half of what you're saying. At least not here in the US. You also need to stop comparing salaried jobs to the hourly jobs like retail and things of that nature. I'm not talking about wal-mart employees. I'm talking about people who do skilled work and go through specialization training and are licensed.

Job security? Unless you're a top performer you're always at risk of getting laid off especially in today's environment. I don't know anyone who works for any corporation that has an employment contract. Salaried corporate jobs are not union jobs anywhere.

As I said pay depends as well. There are people in certain specialized hourly fields that make $100k, $200K, etc. In general salaried jobs pay better than hourly jobs, however there are many specialized fields that pay hourly that pay better or the same as salaried jobs. Not everyone works on Wall Street.

Stock options - This is typically a benefit only for executives. Your typical employee rarely gets this benefit

Personal expense accounts - never heard of businesses giving this unless you're talking about people who travel for their jobs and have their expenses paid for them. Again, your typical salaried worker doesn't get this benfit.

Pension plans - Unless you work in a government job, pension plans pretty much no longer exist. I don't know of one company that offers them these days. 401K is the most prevalent these days. Many companies will match around 5% of your contributions.

Better dental/health benefits, this is also debatable. In general it's probably true, but I can't confirm that.

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