HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > Non-Sports > The Lounge
The Lounge "...Where the parking lot of the Igloo meets the concourse of the Nassau County Coliseum and the bathroom line of the Skyreach..." - Wickedbsfan

Math Degree: Where Does it Get You?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
12-13-2012, 09:19 PM
  #1
Kane One
Global Moderator
vBookie Bookie
 
Kane One's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Brooklyn, New NY
Country: United States
Posts: 26,143
vCash: 2800
Math Degree: Where Does it Get You?

I tend to keep switching my college major all the damn time, and since I just recently took pre-cal, I happen to love it. I'm wondering if I happen to switch my major to mathematics, what could I do with that degree?

__________________
++++++++++[>+++++++>++++++++++>+++>+<<<<
-]>++++++.>+.+++++++++++++++.>+++++++++.<-.
>-------.<<-----.>----.>.<<+++++++++++.>-------------
-.+++++++++++++.-------.--.+++++++++++++.+.>+.>.

NHL Standings Under Different Point Systems
Kane One is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 09:22 PM
  #2
KesselBuiltMyHotrod
Registered User
 
KesselBuiltMyHotrod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: MA
Country: United States
Posts: 20,026
vCash: 50
Job in a factory.

KesselBuiltMyHotrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 09:22 PM
  #3
Montag DP
Sabres fan in...
 
Montag DP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: ...Atlanta
Country: United States
Posts: 6,590
vCash: 500
You could take courses that are a lot harder than pre-calc.

Montag DP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 09:26 PM
  #4
StringerBell
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10,000
vCash: 500
I hate to be the guy who says it, but regardless of how much you enjoy pre-calc you better be really, really good at it if you want to major in math.

StringerBell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 09:26 PM
  #5
Jesus Teemu
Registered User
 
Jesus Teemu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Calgary
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,119
vCash: 500
Statistician, actuary, financial analyst, teacher, and of course Mathematician

I though I wanted to be a math major too, but it became far too abstract for me. Oh and hard.

edit: If you really like math, do it. It is a very, very respected degree.


Last edited by Jesus Teemu: 12-13-2012 at 09:31 PM.
Jesus Teemu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 09:46 PM
  #6
Kane One
Global Moderator
vBookie Bookie
 
Kane One's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Brooklyn, New NY
Country: United States
Posts: 26,143
vCash: 2800
Quote:
Originally Posted by StringerBell View Post
I hate to be the guy who says it, but regardless of how much you enjoy pre-calc you better be really, really good at it if you want to major in math.
I was always good at math, but this class just showed me how much I love it.

Kane One is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 09:58 PM
  #7
njdevscup30
Boom Boom
 
njdevscup30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Philthy Country
Country: United States
Posts: 3,443
vCash: 131
Pre-calc is not going to give you a good idea of what it's like being a math major.

Having a math degree allows you to do everything but won't be the most desired degree for most.

Are you interested in theoretical (professor) or applied (actuary)?

njdevscup30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 10:36 PM
  #8
Kane One
Global Moderator
vBookie Bookie
 
Kane One's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Brooklyn, New NY
Country: United States
Posts: 26,143
vCash: 2800
Quote:
Originally Posted by njdevscup30 View Post
Pre-calc is not going to give you a good idea of what it's like being a math major.

Having a math degree allows you to do everything but won't be the most desired degree for most.

Are you interested in theoretical (professor) or applied (actuary)?
Uh.. is there anything else?

If I had to choose one, I'd say actuary. At least in my current major, I still have to take actual calculus, so maybe that will help me make my mind if I want to switch.

Kane One is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 10:41 PM
  #9
brtriad
Registered User
 
brtriad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: The Loop
Country: United States
Posts: 13,004
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to brtriad
Financial engineering for one. You probably want to get through differential calculus with ease before you commit yourself to a degree in mathematics.

brtriad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 10:49 PM
  #10
Jesus Teemu
Registered User
 
Jesus Teemu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Calgary
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,119
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneone View Post
Uh.. is there anything else?

If I had to choose one, I'd say actuary. At least in my current major, I still have to take actual calculus, so maybe that will help me make my mind if I want to switch.
Economist, epidemiologist are a couple more.

Also, even if you don't want to do one of those careers, but would rather go into the military or something, having a math major is very useful. I've heard the canadian air force loves people with 'technical' degrees which include math, physics, comp sci etc. Would expect it to be the same in the states too.

Jesus Teemu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 10:49 PM
  #11
SuperJayMann
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Calgary
Country: Canada
Posts: 583
vCash: 500

SuperJayMann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 11:02 PM
  #12
Armond White
Go Sabres!
 
Armond White's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Oakland Zoo
Country: United States
Posts: 10,224
vCash: 500
Ex-girlfriend got a math degree. Apparently it gets you into a math grad program, and no longer talking to me.

Armond White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 11:31 PM
  #13
Fire Lindy
Trust the System
 
Fire Lindy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3,842
vCash: 500
If I was really good in math, I'd major in something like computer engineering. You are basically guaranteed a great job right out of college..of course you also have to be interested in computers.

Fire Lindy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 11:34 PM
  #14
Finnish your Czech
Jermain Defriend
 
Finnish your Czech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Toronto
Country: Finland
Posts: 42,220
vCash: 50
You should definitely take a college level calculus course before saying you'd like to major in calc.

What is pre-calc by the way? Is it just learning about what functions are?

Finnish your Czech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 11:35 PM
  #15
vBurmi
Blue-Line Dekes
 
vBurmi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Greater Detroit
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,262
vCash: 779
Advanced math courses are nothing like what you're doing now. If you like grinding through step after step of algebra, you'll miss that. They're extremely abstract. Read the wiki page on topology and as many related/linked articles as possible. You'll quickly get an idea of what I mean by abstract.

If you want something more practical but still math-centric, try electrical engineering.

vBurmi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 11:35 PM
  #16
Finnish your Czech
Jermain Defriend
 
Finnish your Czech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Toronto
Country: Finland
Posts: 42,220
vCash: 50
Or any engineering really^

Finnish your Czech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-13-2012, 11:38 PM
  #17
Fire Lindy
Trust the System
 
Fire Lindy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3,842
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finnish your Czech View Post
Or any engineering really^
Truth, I just thought of comp engineering since I have interest in computers but didn't have the math ability to try to major in it. Plus, my buddy graduated from Cornell and got a job with Intel right out of college making $90,000 with a $15,000 signing bonus

Fire Lindy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 12:40 AM
  #18
Faute
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by vBurmi View Post
Advanced math courses are nothing like what you're doing now. If you like grinding through step after step of algebra, you'll miss that. They're extremely abstract. Read the wiki page on topology and as many related/linked articles as possible. You'll quickly get an idea of what I mean by abstract.

If you want something more practical but still math-centric, try electrical engineering.
I'm an electrical engineering graduate student. The reason I went into the program was because I liked applied maths and physics. Turns out, there wasn't a lot of either in the undergraduate program. Some of my classmates graduated without really knowing how to solve analytically very, very basic partial derivative equations. On the other hand, I have to admit that my undergraduate school is known to be very applied. I pretty much had to go into graduate school to get my fix of maths, which I did by taking classes outside my department (namely, numerical computation classes from the computer science department). Even then, I look like an oddity in my research group because I'm taking these classes by my own choice...

I think an applied mathematics degree could be interesting for OP, if he doesn't mind a lot of programming. There's a lot of interest in competent numerical "computationists" in many fields (finance, engineering, physics, and so on). Obviously, I don't think applied mathematics undergraduate degrees are too common.

Faute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 01:01 AM
  #19
G51 K81*
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,556
vCash: 500
Once you start doing calc/proofs/equations with no numbers, math starts to suck imo.

G51 K81* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 01:23 AM
  #20
Finnish your Czech
Jermain Defriend
 
Finnish your Czech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Toronto
Country: Finland
Posts: 42,220
vCash: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by G51 K81 View Post
Once you start doing calc/proofs/equations with no numbers, math starts to suck imo.
I disagree calculus is pretty fun if you enjoy math. It has some cool applications to it.

Proofs on the other hand are extremely abstract from what I know, and it requires someone to have a very strange love of math to enjoy.

__________________
http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=94272&dateline=135589  1618
Finnish your Czech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 01:32 AM
  #21
vBurmi
Blue-Line Dekes
 
vBurmi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Greater Detroit
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,262
vCash: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finnish your Czech View Post
Or any engineering really^
Not true. Civil engineering hardly requires any advanced math and I'm sure there are other disciplines with even less. Electrical and Computer are definitely the most mathematically intense engineering programs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faute View Post
I'm an electrical engineering graduate student. The reason I went into the program was because I liked applied maths and physics. Turns out, there wasn't a lot of either in the undergraduate program. Some of my classmates graduated without really knowing how to solve analytically very, very basic partial derivative equations. On the other hand, I have to admit that my undergraduate school is known to be very applied. I pretty much had to go into graduate school to get my fix of maths, which I did by taking classes outside my department (namely, numerical computation classes from the computer science department). Even then, I look like an oddity in my research group because I'm taking these classes by my own choice...

I think an applied mathematics degree could be interesting for OP, if he doesn't mind a lot of programming. There's a lot of interest in competent numerical "computationists" in many fields (finance, engineering, physics, and so on). Obviously, I don't think applied mathematics undergraduate degrees are too common.
I guess it depends on the school since my undergrad in EE required 6 math classes, plus Signal Processing (x2), Control Systems (x2), Communications (x2), Filter Design, and Electromagnetics, the majority of which were basically math classes. So really it depends on the kind of math he likes. If he wants to solve a ton of integrals by hand, that was my undergrad EE in a nutshell. I didn't see anything like topology until the graduate level and even then not enough of it that it could be a motivating factor.

vBurmi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 07:10 AM
  #22
graffix6x
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 14
vCash: 500
I started out in Mechanical Engineering and quickly figured out that it was something I was not interested in. I then changed to Mathematics because it was something that came natural and was interesting.

The school I went to made you select an "area of interest" in addition to your Math degree. This was essentially a minor. I cant remember them all but Actuary, IST, Statistics were a few of them.

The first year and a half to two years weren't too bad but it really begins to challenge you when you get into the theory and proof parts of it. You really have to dedicate yourself when it comes to certain areas like Game Theory and Calc2/Calc3 proofs.

I ended up getting into Reliability Engineering after college and have been doing it for 6 years now and love it. There are a lot of math majors in my field so that could possibly be another option.

graffix6x is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 07:44 AM
  #23
MatthewT
Registered User
 
MatthewT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Country: Canada
Posts: 16,588
vCash: 500
I have a BSc. in Pure Math, im doing education right now

MatthewT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 07:51 AM
  #24
Melrose Munch
Registered User
 
Melrose Munch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14,117
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneone View Post
I tend to keep switching my college major all the damn time, and since I just recently took pre-cal, I happen to love it. I'm wondering if I happen to switch my major to mathematics, what could I do with that degree?
Wall Street.

Melrose Munch is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
12-14-2012, 08:04 AM
  #25
beowulf
Poster of the Year!
 
beowulf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ottawa
Country: Canada
Posts: 33,732
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to beowulf
Card counter in Vegas and other casino towns.

beowulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:30 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.