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How popular is hockey in Denmark?

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12-08-2012, 08:20 AM
  #1
BalticWarrior
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How popular is hockey in Denmark?

With good players like bodker,ellers,regin and plenty of young guys comming in, how popular is hockey in Denmark?

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12-08-2012, 11:58 AM
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Justinov
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Originally Posted by Helo View Post
With good players like bodker,ellers,regin and plenty of young guys comming in, how popular is hockey in Denmark?
With Danish players in the NHL and Denmark in the elitedivision Hockey actually get some coverage in newspaper, which almost never happened before.
So from once being an exotic sport, most people actually know it exists now

But in popularity meaning kids that want to play it, you run into the problem of finding a rink to actually play on and having parents with deep pockets since it's quite expensive.

If you come from one of the towns in Jutland that have a hockey-team, it's more likely that a kid would actually choose to play hockey on his/hers own accord. In Copenhagen I think it's more or less exclusively kids of hockey families that play or can get their close friends to play as well. There are so many other options that its still a very unlikely choice.
Then you have huge chunks of Denmark without any rinks at all, where it's not an option at all.
If you see the map of the pro-clubs on eliteprospect.com
http://www.eliteprospects.com/league...hp?leagueid=16

Clubs exist in the suburbs of Copenhagen -> Rødovre, Herlev, Copenhagen (Hvidovre). Then also five amateur clubs Gentofte, Gladsaxe, Rungsted, KSF, Amager, but outside of Copenhagen in the rest of Sjælland or the islands south of there......a big NOTHING.
It would also help a lot of we could get hockey more established in Århus (Denmark second largest town and on the eastcoast of central Jutland, just under the "snotty nose of the face of Jutland"), but it's still only a small amateur club. That creates also a big hole between Herning and Aalborg with no opportunities. (only Silkeborg and Aarhus amateur clubs, but they hardly will produce any NHL talents)

Anyways what a derby Aarhus-Randers could potentially be in hockey
A Vejle/Kolding club and Næstved + Slagelse could really fill out some of the blank holes in hockey Denmark.

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12-08-2012, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justinov View Post
With Danish players in the NHL and Denmark in the elitedivision Hockey actually get some coverage in newspaper, which almost never happened before.
So from once being an exotic sport, most people actually know it exists now

But in popularity meaning kids that want to play it, you run into the problem of finding a rink to actually play on and having parents with deep pockets since it's quite expensive.

If you come from one of the towns in Jutland that have a hockey-team, it's more likely that a kid would actually choose to play hockey on his/hers own accord. In Copenhagen I think it's more or less exclusively kids of hockey families that play or can get their close friends to play as well. There are so many other options that its still a very unlikely choice.
Then you have huge chunks of Denmark without any rinks at all, where it's not an option at all.
If you see the map of the pro-clubs on eliteprospect.com
http://www.eliteprospects.com/league...hp?leagueid=16

Clubs exist in the suburbs of Copenhagen -> Rødovre, Herlev, Copenhagen (Hvidovre). Then also five amateur clubs Gentofte, Gladsaxe, Rungsted, KSF, Amager, but outside of Copenhagen in the rest of Sjælland or the islands south of there......a big NOTHING.
It would also help a lot of we could get hockey more established in Århus (Denmark second largest town and on the eastcoast of central Jutland, just under the "snotty nose of the face of Jutland"), but it's still only a small amateur club. That creates also a big hole between Herning and Aalborg with no opportunities. (only Silkeborg and Aarhus amateur clubs, but they hardly will produce any NHL talents)

Anyways what a derby Aarhus-Randers could potentially be in hockey
A Vejle/Kolding club and Næstved + Slagelse could really fill out some of the blank holes in hockey Denmark.
Do you see this as problem in the future for Denmark? I mean it`s not all that different from Latvia except for the fact that hockey is very popular `round here (Dinamo Riga and KHL helps immensly in that regard) so parents are alot more likely to bring their kids to play,also fact that economic situation is getting better here more parents are able to afford this expensive sport.

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12-08-2012, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Helo View Post
Do you see this as problem in the future for Denmark? I mean it`s not all that different from Latvia except for the fact that hockey is very popular `round here (Dinamo Riga and KHL helps immensly in that regard) so parents are alot more likely to bring their kids to play,also fact that economic situation is getting better here more parents are able to afford this expensive sport.
It's a problem that the two big cities are not that hockey interested. In Århus the population 250.000 in the town and 318.000 in the greater commune and Copenhagen has 1,213 mil). That's around 1,5 mil out of 5,5 mil that could be more awakened to hockey.

Instead of all the small suburb clubs a HC Copenhagen in style with FC Copenhagen in football could bring sponsor money, rink building, more press and more opportunities for kids. But for a rich guy to step in we need an economic boom. Can't see it happening with the current economic climate. Still Copenhagen has the suburbs clubs. Aarhus is where it could really give Denmark a boost of manpower.

Since our playing pool is so small it will be expected that talent production will become very uneven. We have had 1 NHL draft in average the last 10 years..pretty amazing, but it's not something that we can be sure will continue.
Im certain though that Oliver Bjørkstrand will be drafted in 2013 and Nikolaj Ehlers in 2014. After that it's way to early to tell.

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12-08-2012, 01:25 PM
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About danish young guns:

Danes developed and drafted out of Sweden: Lars Eller, Frans Nielsen, Philip Larsen, Morten Madsen.

Danes playing and developing in sweden before moving on: Peter Regin, Mikkel Boedker, Oliver Lauridsen, Frederik Andersen, Nicklas Hardt.

Drafted prospects playing in sweden right now: Nicklas Jensen, Thomas Spelling.

Draft eligible danes in sweden: Mads Eller.


Last edited by Hockeyfrilla: 12-08-2012 at 01:45 PM.
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12-08-2012, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Hockeyfrilla View Post
Danes developed and drafted out of Sweden: Lars Eller, Frans Nielsen, Philip Larsen, Morten Madsen.

Danes playing and developing in sweden before moving on: Peter Regin, Mikkel Boedker, Oliver Lauridsen, Frederik Andersen.

Drafted prospects playing in sweden right now: Nicklas Jensen, Thomas Spelling.

Draft eligible danes in sweden: Mads Eller.
Yes that is absolutely true. Without proximity to Sweden we wouldn't have risen as a hockey power.
Im talking about when the kids are younger than 14-15-16 years of age. Preferably you have to start as early as possible. Then when you have talent you move to Sweden...but you have to nurture that talent in Denmark from age 5 and up to the time leaving for Sweden and its hockeygymnasiums.
Especially Rødovre and Herning has done that extremely well though the years, and now other clubs start to follow.


Last edited by Justinov: 12-12-2012 at 12:47 PM.
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12-11-2012, 12:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfrilla View Post
About danish young guns:

Danes developed and drafted out of Sweden: Lars Eller, Frans Nielsen, Philip Larsen, Morten Madsen.

Danes playing and developing in sweden before moving on: Peter Regin, Mikkel Boedker, Oliver Lauridsen, Frederik Andersen, Nicklas Hardt.

Drafted prospects playing in sweden right now: Nicklas Jensen, Thomas Spelling.

Draft eligible danes in sweden: Mads Eller.
What is your point? That Sweden has a better hockey level than Denmark? We all now that. It has always been that way. It's no surprise and nothing new that the best players move to a better and more professional environment. But it doesn't change the fact that this didn't happen 15 year ago and that the change is largely due to the development of Danish youth hockey. So about the Danish young guns: They all played in Denmark before they went to Sweden.

That many of these players owe a great part of their development to Sweden is nothing new, but ask yourself the question: Why does Swedish teams even bother to bring them over when there are plenty of Swedish kids to take from? Because these players are high end talents when they leave Denmark, who have been so well developed in Denmark from they were 3 to age 15-18 that they can compare themselves with the best Swedish prospects in the same age group.

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12-13-2012, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Justinov View Post
Instead of all the small suburb clubs a HC Copenhagen in style with FC Copenhagen in football could bring sponsor money, rink building, more press and more opportunities for kids. But for a rich guy to step in we need an economic boom. Can't see it happening with the current economic climate. Still Copenhagen has the suburbs clubs. Aarhus is where it could really give Denmark a boost of manpower.
I was in Copenhagen over the weekend and I talked about hockey for a while with a friend, he said that they had already tried to create a "FCK"-style hockey club in Copenhagen and that it had failed.

Creating a big "superclub" isn't going to change anything if there isn't already an established fan base and media interest in the sport. It's not some magic solution that'll instantly solve all problems.

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12-14-2012, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Franck View Post
I was in Copenhagen over the weekend and I talked about hockey for a while with a friend, he said that they had already tried to create a "FCK"-style hockey club in Copenhagen and that it had failed.

Creating a big "superclub" isn't going to change anything if there isn't already an established fan base and media interest in the sport. It's not some magic solution that'll instantly solve all problems.
It's actually a bit more long term what I had in mind. It doesn't have to be a hockey powerhouse internationally right away, but just a modern arena with tons of opportunity to get kids to play.
Hockey is really in a little bit of crises in Copenhagen. Only three teams have pro-teams. Rødovre is 6'th, Herlev 7'th and Copenhagen (Hvidovre) is 9'th out of the 9 pro teams in Denmark.
Rungsted went bankrupt and only have an amateur team. Gentofte once had pro-hockey, but is only amateur. Gladsaxe, KSF, Amager also only amateur.

Having a strong central Copenhagen team could build a new fan basis. Like FC Copenhagen in football that is from 1993 or the now bankrupt shortlived handballclub AG Copenhagen that still played for over 20.000 people against Barcelona. Their bankrupcy was financial mismanagement...not lack of spectators.
Off course hockey wont get so many spectators as football or handball but if it's an FC Copenhagen equivalent I'm sure it would be possible to get a solid fan basis fairly fast. The financial crises just put any such ideas on hold.
Actually you could spice it with some "Øresund tornament" where you invite Malmö and/or Rögle that could get something established.

Conclusion: More kids to play...and more parents and friends will also go to see them. Then the puck is sliding.

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12-14-2012, 04:03 PM
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My 2 cents:

Trying to get people from inner Copenhagen to play will be a tough mission.

A) Hockey is not a very urban sport. It's a suburban sport. A lot of equipment to buy and handle. It's not a accessible as football(soccer) to city kids from small means. Nor is it fancy enough for the families with some money to spend on their kids.

B) It's not like a lot of sports outside of football has strong Copenhagen-cores. Handball is mainly a Jutland-sport. In floorball there's elite league club in CPH but again it's Jutland and Rodovre(Funny coincident? ) dominating the league. Swimming are doing alright i guess but the elite talent comes from suburban areas. Little sports are doing just fine without having Copenhagen as it's core.

So I don't see the big potential in invading inner Copenhagen so to speak. Btw: Skaterhockey is doing okay in there with some ex-icehockey players so that might be a way...

Whether or not it's a big problem or not... I don't know. Having the sport grow out of little environments like Herning and Rodovre hasn't stopped us going from Div C in 1990 to a spot in the quarterfinals at the WC in 2010(I think?). I think we're reaching the potential that Denmark has. All we can do is tweaks and maximizing. Denmark will never be a hockey-country nor a hockey-force

And yes yes I know there's a lot of people we could get to play hockey and a couple of them could be the next Frans Nielsen but if Danish hockey has one lesson to the world it is that quality in development beats quantity. I'm not saying it woundn't be easier to develop elite talent with more kids playing hockey - just saying it isn't impossible

With the means we have now we're doing alright. We have to optimize the development of the kids we've got and hope they pan out.

And to hockeyfrilla> That list tells very little about the reality both in the past and in the present

Some of the players you mention spend some of their junior years in Sweden. Mikkel Boedker. Lars Eller. Philip Larsen. Morten Madsen

Some of the names went to Sweden to play pro. after completing junior years in Denmark and then spending a year or two in the Danish League. Thomas Spelling. Peter Regin. Nicklas Hardt.

Then there's some of the names who just have spend a year or less in Sweden during pro. development. Frederik Andersen. Nicklas Jensen.

Frans Nielsen and Jannik Hansen some combos of the three.

I'm not gonna get into a Sweden vs. Denmark claim of talent because that's not how it works i my mind. But some of the routes to hockey in NA are very different and some involve Sweden a lot, some involve Sweden very little in the development

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12-15-2012, 05:54 PM
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I think we're reaching the potential that Denmark has. All we can do is tweaks and maximizing. Denmark will never be a hockey-country nor a hockey-force
If everyone in Danish hockey shares the same defeatist attitude that you express here then I am sure that you'll end up being right.

Peoples sporting preferences change all the time, how popular a sport is in the present has very little influence on the future. Prior to the second world war the most popular sports in the United States were baseball, boxing and horse racing, I'm sure you're aware of how much things have changed since then.

In your post you mention floorball, a sport that didn't even exist before the 70s and wasn't taken seriously by anyone until 15-20 years ago. In 40 years it has gone from being something that a few friends played to pass the time on the school yard to being a sport with televised professional leagues and international championships with teams from all over the world taking part. That if anything should show you just how quickly things can change.

If the people in charge of Danish hockey stay ambitious and keep striving towards improvement, reward Herning and Rødovre for their successes and help the other top clubs follow their example I see no reason why hockey wouldn't be able to establish itself as the 2nd most popular team sport in Denmark and for the Danish national team to start rivalling nations like Slovakia or the Czech Republic in terms of talent.

You may not have the demographics to be able to challenge Canada, Russia or the US long-term, but you sure have the potential to become much, much better than you are now.

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12-18-2012, 06:44 AM
  #12
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Originally Posted by Franck View Post
If everyone in Danish hockey shares the same defeatist attitude that you express here then I am sure that you'll end up being right.

Peoples sporting preferences change all the time, how popular a sport is in the present has very little influence on the future. Prior to the second world war the most popular sports in the United States were baseball, boxing and horse racing, I'm sure you're aware of how much things have changed since then.

In your post you mention floorball, a sport that didn't even exist before the 70s and wasn't taken seriously by anyone until 15-20 years ago. In 40 years it has gone from being something that a few friends played to pass the time on the school yard to being a sport with televised professional leagues and international championships with teams from all over the world taking part. That if anything should show you just how quickly things can change.

If the people in charge of Danish hockey stay ambitious and keep striving towards improvement, reward Herning and Rødovre for their successes and help the other top clubs follow their example I see no reason why hockey wouldn't be able to establish itself as the 2nd most popular team sport in Denmark and for the Danish national team to start rivalling nations like Slovakia or the Czech Republic in terms of talent.

You may not have the demographics to be able to challenge Canada, Russia or the US long-term, but you sure have the potential to become much, much better than you are now.
I actually totally agree with you there on these points.
Icehockey has every chance of getting going in Denmark if there is money enough to build rinks. The building boom of arenas in bygone days (60's-70's) had made Denmark a world power in handball and badminton that are indoor sports.
Denmark is almost the only nation standing in the way of a total asian dominace (and especially chinese dominance) in badminton. This years super series final in China has 3 wins by China and 2 by Denmark.
I'm certain if Denmark disappared as a force in Badminton most of Europe would end up in a defeatist attitude, that maybe badminton is better suited to asian genetics or something like that?!
The same tendency of defeatism is happening in Table Tennis where China is all dominant, but Sweden showed in the 80's and 90's that is was possible to beat them even in China.
With a concentrated effort it could be possible for icehockey as well. As you say floorball came from nowhere and is now a sport with great media attention in Sweden and world dominance as we can see this last tournament where even Finland in the final got totally smashed.
Building of rinks demands a political and economic effort. But media can also create attention and make kids want to play.....

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12-18-2012, 08:18 AM
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Besides us disagreeing on Denmarks potential, I think you kinda stole my point. I was arguing that "a hockey revolution" through getting the sport into Copenhagen wasn't the way. Building on what you've got is. And that's - like it has been for the last 20 years - one small step at a time.

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Originally Posted by Franck View Post
Peoples sporting preferences change all the time, how popular a sport is in the present has very little influence on the future. Prior to the second world war the most popular sports in the United States were baseball, boxing and horse racing, I'm sure you're aware of how much things have changed since then.
Year well if the timetables in 50-60 years I have not idea what sports gonna be number 1 in Denmark.(Still put my money on football though) I was thinking more along the lines of 5-10 years. My point was that it would be better for Denmark to focus on what it's doing right now instead of turning into a widespread sport in Denmark with the likes of Football. 'Cause it's just not gonna happen. Even in places like Rodovre(where i'm from) football's bigger than hockey(Haven't got any numbers - just my feeling having spend time in both environments)

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Originally Posted by Franck View Post
In your post you mention floorball, a sport that didn't even exist before the 70s and wasn't taken seriously by anyone until 15-20 years ago. In 40 years it has gone from being something that a few friends played to pass the time on the school yard to being a sport with televised professional leagues and international championships with teams from all over the world taking part. That if anything should show you just how quickly things can change.
Floorball's still nothing in Denmark, so again i'm not quite buying the argument for Denmark here. Nobody watches the games but relatives, and the money in is just... But hey: good for you. It's a nice sport to watch

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Originally Posted by Franck View Post
If the people in charge of Danish hockey stay ambitious and keep striving towards improvement, reward Herning and Rødovre for their successes and help the other top clubs follow their example I see no reason why hockey wouldn't be able to establish itself as the 2nd most popular team sport in Denmark and for the Danish national team to start rivalling nations like Slovakia or the Czech Republic in terms of talent.
Well that's actually kinda my point. Focus on the environments where hockey is strong right now. Copy that. Maximize the talent we've got and see where it takes us. All i'm saying is that it's smarter to build on what you've already got then start trying to get Copenhagen in on it.

That's not ambitious. That's just smart. Ambitious is to go on a campaign to make Copenhagen a new power house in Danish hockey to try and get thousand and thousand of members in new places. And i'd would be lovely if we could. But for now I just see more potential in going the other way around.

This might be influence by the mentality in the Danish League that is still on the recovery after some up-beat years before the financial trouble broke out. That showed us how much of the money in the sports was based on sponsors and not on attendance. That's not a good way to run business. And it's not a good way to get the best out of the elite talent we have.

Look at what they are doing in Rodovre. Kids where practising at 6:00 in the morning. The hockey club went to city hall and got a new rink so that they can improve conditions on the junior teams. That's where Denmark and Rodovre gets it's future players from. Not the KSF rink in Copenhagen. Not the Aarhus rink.

They contacted the local public school and now it has it's own sports line so the school and practice is no longer collide. In SoenderjyskE they have done some remarkable works with a otherwise poor junior department.

That's the kind of improvements that would get results IMO. It's about quality, not quantity.

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Originally Posted by Franck View Post
You may not have the demographics to be able to challenge Canada, Russia or the US long-term, but you sure have the potential to become much, much better than you are now.
Much, much better would be to challange Canada, Russia and US long term. "Just" better would be repeating the '10 WC and joining the Olympics on a regular basis with the odd magical run once every while.


Last edited by Bank: 12-18-2012 at 08:54 AM.
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12-18-2012, 08:43 AM
  #14
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Originally Posted by Justinov View Post
Icehockey has every chance of getting going in Denmark if there is money enough to build rinks. The building boom of arenas in bygone days (60's-70's) had made Denmark a world power in handball and badminton that are indoor sports.
A) Don't see why that changes the argument that hockey is a suburban sport - nor why Copenhagen is essential to the growth of hockey in Denmark.

B) That period of time is not comparable to the current period of time in terms of economy. And if you ask me - which you most likely wouldn't 'cause you get a deadbeat answar - nor is the political demand to upgrade the unionlife(Foreningslivet - not quite sure how to put in English) for the working class in the suburbans. The city halls around Denmark are year after year trying to cope with the pressure of their duties to society while getting budget cut after budget cut. There is - nor in crisis or good times - a which that city hall takes care of anything else the what's demanded. And that's not a change in the structure of sports in Denmark. Frankly it should be. Hockey will do just fine without the government leading it on...

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Denmark is almost the only nation standing in the way of a total asian dominace (and especially chinese dominance) in badminton. This years super series final in China has 3 wins by China and 2 by Denmark.
I'm certain if Denmark disappared as a force in Badminton most of Europe would end up in a defeatist attitude, that maybe badminton is better suited to asian genetics or something like that?!
And jet Badminton isn't #2 sport in Denmark... It's 5th pr. DIF. I haven't got a clue about how to get results in Badminton but

A) From what I know Badminton to creates the elite talent in strong environments outside of Copenhagen.

B) Since the one sport is a either one-man-game or a two-man-game and the other needs at least sixteen good players I would say the demand for diversity is different.


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The same tendency of defeatism is happening in Table Tennis where China is all dominant, but Sweden showed in the 80's and 90's that is was possible to beat them even in China.
With a concentrated effort it could be possible for icehockey as well. Building of rinks demands a political and economic effort.
Don't shoot the messenger but the demand for such a gamble on icehockey isn't there. The people of Silkeborg, Copenhagen, Aarhus, Holstebro, Viborg, Slagelse or Vordingborg haven't been rioting for new icehockey rinks.

I simply can't see the crime in pointing out that with what's in hand, we can take maybe not the top level but possibly into the worlds top 8. Our current set-up has gotten us this far and will possibly bring us further in slow but steady pace if we just focus the energy on where there is a demand for it instead of wishing for something that ain't gonna happen.

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But media can also create attention and make kids want to play.....
Yeah well if the club they play at sucks they gonna quit right after the WC is over. One thing isn't gonna do on it's own but hearing about it from your school mates, experiencing good coaches, fun practices and playing tournaments in other countries sure is a bigger thing if you ask me.

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12-18-2012, 01:38 PM
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A) Don't see why that changes the argument that hockey is a suburban sport - nor why Copenhagen is essential to the growth of hockey in Denmark.

B) That period of time is not comparable to the current period of time in terms of economy. And if you ask me - which you most likely wouldn't 'cause you get a deadbeat answar - nor is the political demand to upgrade the unionlife(Foreningslivet - not quite sure how to put in English) for the working class in the suburbans. The city halls around Denmark are year after year trying to cope with the pressure of their duties to society while getting budget cut after budget cut. There is - nor in crisis or good times - a which that city hall takes care of anything else the what's demanded. And that's not a change in the structure of sports in Denmark. Frankly it should be. Hockey will do just fine without the government leading it on...

And jet Badminton isn't #2 sport in Denmark... It's 5th pr. DIF. I haven't got a clue about how to get results in Badminton but

A) From what I know Badminton to creates the elite talent in strong environments outside of Copenhagen.

B) Since the one sport is a either one-man-game or a two-man-game and the other needs at least sixteen good players I would say the demand for diversity is different.

Don't shoot the messenger but the demand for such a gamble on icehockey isn't there. The people of Silkeborg, Copenhagen, Aarhus, Holstebro, Viborg, Slagelse or Vordingborg haven't been rioting for new icehockey rinks.

I simply can't see the crime in pointing out that with what's in hand, we can take maybe not the top level but possibly into the worlds top 8. Our current set-up has gotten us this far and will possibly bring us further in slow but steady pace if we just focus the energy on where there is a demand for it instead of wishing for something that ain't gonna happen.

Yeah well if the club they play at sucks they gonna quit right after the WC is over. One thing isn't gonna do on it's own but hearing about it from your school mates, experiencing good coaches, fun practices and playing tournaments in other countries sure is a bigger thing if you ask me.

1) Actually I would say with the "gentrification" (increased marked value of central capital areas) kids that have more economic affluent parents might actually choose hockey, especially since central Copenhagen really lack behind in other sports beside football (as you said). People in central Copenhagen are not poorer than people in the suburbs anymore. So I don't think it is written that hockey should stay as a suburban sport. Actually the lack of so many sport could be an advantage for a new sport bursting forward...less competition.
I agree that the econonic climate doesn't make it likely for the commune or some private guy to build major sports arenas or training facilitlies in Copenhagen. But if one will be build it's the lack of other opportunities that could bring more to choose hockey as their sport.

The lack of demand for hockey rinks in the areas you mention is because people don't even reflect over the opportunity. But if you get it build then the interest will spread through schools.......it just that in my oppinion opportunity to see and play (often with friends from school) is the most important factor when you choose a sport as a kid. But for such an exotic sport as badminton (as it is to the rest of europe) to be 5'th tells alot about that access makes for members. I totally agree that a club in itself isn't enough. It has to be run the right way to attract kids and fans. But all sports and clubs are in direct competition that way.

I mean we are 12-13 world ranking with just 4.000 registred players. It could take decades to reach into top-8, but the future is hard to predict. It's whether hockey in Denmark will get over the critical face of becoming a "household" sport, or it's just a temporary bloom. Qualifying for the olympic games would be quite important since the team would get almost all the danish media attention since they have no other danish wintersport competition than curling. If they do well then who knows after the olympics there could be an influx of kids wanting to play.

I agree that it's not likely that Denmark becomes a top-8 nation, but it's certainly not impossible either. It's certainly also possible that kids in Copenhagen would want to play hockey as kids in a suburb if they have a good local opportunity to do so.

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12-18-2012, 03:29 PM
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When I say it's suburban sport it's because it demands a lot of micro-logistic. The amount of equipment demands a lot of transporting from families and/or big locker facilities. That often fits suburban families better both at home but also when it comes to transport than urban families who pay more for less space and usually cycles or use public transport. None which are fitting for a hockey player.

About the Badminton thing I don't see the consistency in your argument? Badminton is doing great without a great Copenhagen core or being a household sport. What's the urgency for those two components?

On TV Danish produced hockey is crap. The rinks aren't build for it and sound and picture are suffering from it. The NHL might be the next NFL - but we're still waiting for the format that makes it work. The current TV2 Sport set-up doesn't pick up new customers. So the breakthrough will come through the NT. Not the other way around.

How do we give the NT the best conditions for reaching these results that will create the breakthrough?

When Jannik Hansen, Frans Nielsen and Peter Regin were young there were zero hockey on TV. That didn't prevent them from being NHL'ers. It's about the quality you put in the practice(Notice how few drop out of the teams on generations with succes) when they are kids.

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12-20-2012, 08:23 AM
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When I say it's suburban sport it's because it demands a lot of micro-logistic. The amount of equipment demands a lot of transporting from families and/or big locker facilities. That often fits suburban families better both at home but also when it comes to transport than urban families who pay more for less space and usually cycles or use public transport. None which are fitting for a hockey player.

About the Badminton thing I don't see the consistency in your argument? Badminton is doing great without a great Copenhagen core or being a household sport. What's the urgency for those two components?

On TV Danish produced hockey is crap. The rinks aren't build for it and sound and picture are suffering from it. The NHL might be the next NFL - but we're still waiting for the format that makes it work. The current TV2 Sport set-up doesn't pick up new customers. So the breakthrough will come through the NT. Not the other way around.

How do we give the NT the best conditions for reaching these results that will create the breakthrough?

When Jannik Hansen, Frans Nielsen and Peter Regin were young there were zero hockey on TV. That didn't prevent them from being NHL'ers. It's about the quality you put in the practice(Notice how few drop out of the teams on generations with succes) when they are kids.
Just to summerize our long discussion you are obviously right in that Denmark has produced NHL caliber players without tapping central Copenhagen talent. My point was basically that the amount of potential players and also media attention could perhaps change drastically if hockey changed from being a provincial/suburb sport to a sport for the city-folk (Århus and Copenhagen). It is just a guess....it's also possible as you say that basically nothing would happen. Timing, luck and a whole number of unforseen things can change this. But without trying, nothing will happen.

I don't think I'm inconsistant with Badminton since it is played both in center and suburb of Copenhagen and probably also in Århus. Big tournaments (super series) like Denmark Open and the invitation tournament Copenhagen Masters are being played in Denmark every year with the best participating.

A modern Copenhagen rink could actually solve the danish produced TV problem that you mention.
I just think that qualifiying for the Olympics in 2014 and maybe getting the WC 2017 (maybe to be played at the Copenhagen Arena) could give the necessary push for danish hockey - more kids, more parents asking where they kids can play, maybe combination of NT success and training demand can get more rinks build.
Again it's a hope, not a certainty since risk-willing capital is hard to get in Europe these days and fashion-choices of young people can go in unforseen directions. It wasn't written that floorball would be big in Sweden.

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12-21-2012, 03:51 AM
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I don't think I'm inconsistant with Badminton since it is played both in center and suburb of Copenhagen and probably also in Århus. Big tournaments (super series) like Denmark Open and the invitation tournament Copenhagen Masters are being played in Denmark every year with the best participating.
Well but again. None of the big Danish players are from Copenhagen. They're from the northern suburb where Badminton has it's strongholds. The Copenhagen-thing is just a nice bonus. That's what I was getting at

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A modern Copenhagen rink could actually solve the danish produced TV problem that you mention.
That we can agree upon good sir

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I just think that qualifiying for the Olympics in 2014 and maybe getting the WC 2017 (maybe to be played at the Copenhagen Arena) could give the necessary push for danish hockey - more kids, more parents asking where they kids can play, maybe combination of NT success and training demand can get more rinks build.
Once again you speak the truth - our difference is on how big an effect it would/will have on the amount of quality prospects created. But no doubt it would be nice to have more people to talk hockey with

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12-21-2012, 09:20 AM
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our difference is on how big an effect it would/will have on the amount of quality prospects created. But no doubt it would be nice to have more people to talk hockey with
Yep (maybe I'm an optismist in that regard ). Quality prospects are offcourse mostly created by having a good training facilities for young players. Having a money-power hockey club in Copenhagen won't solve anything for the future of danish hockey if it's only based on import and not with a youth program as seen in Rødovre and Herning. Succes with NT is what will bring players to the clubs....

It is actually incredible how rarely you meet anyone in Copenhagen that is interested in hockey, so yeah it would definitely by nice to have more people to talk to.

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12-23-2012, 06:10 PM
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Whats your opinion on a KHL based danish team?

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12-23-2012, 06:34 PM
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Whats your opinion on a KHL based danish team?
Would be awesome but it wont happen until a decent arena is build. However, Copenhagen is building a multi-arena which should be finished in the 2nd part of 2015. So I guess 2016 is the most likely.... If someone is willing to spend cash on a team.

Do you know what the average budget for a team in the KHL is?

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12-25-2012, 03:38 AM
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Would be awesome but it wont happen until a decent arena is build. However, Copenhagen is building a multi-arena which should be finished in the 2nd part of 2015. So I guess 2016 is the most likely.... If someone is willing to spend cash on a team.

Do you know what the average budget for a team in the KHL is?
Herning already have a decent arena, in an area with actual hockey interest. But it's not going to happen.

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12-25-2012, 09:56 AM
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Is the situation better or worse in Norway?

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12-25-2012, 10:25 AM
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Herning already have a decent arena, in an area with actual hockey interest. But it's not going to happen.
Well, both Aalborg and Sønderjyske's got similar, even slightly bigger arenas (capacity of 5.000 spectators, Herning's only got a capacity of 4.100) and there's hockey interest in Sønderjylland as well... I think DenGC was thinking of something even bigger than that, probably of an 10.000+ spectator arena... I highly doubt ice hockey could fill that much in Denmark.
Even now, Sønderjyske and Aalborg struggle filling their arena, Sønderjyske's got an average attendance of around 2.000. Recently, they had a sponsor give away all the tickets for a game vs. Odense for free, they managed to attract 4.200 - still 800 spectators short of "selling out".
As for Aalborg, having an NHL'er on their roster and having a pretty successful season, they actually managed to attract an respectable average of almost 3.000 spectators to their home games.

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12-25-2012, 05:30 PM
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I was assuming that a team in the KHL would need at least 12.000-14.000 stadium capacity, which is exactly what the future arena in Copenhagen will have. Fill half of it and I believe you are around the average number of spectators at a KHL game.

I dont think that its an outrageous number of fans. A big effort in promotion of hockey could and should be done in and around that time. With a hopefully successful Olympic qualification and participation, a World championship taking place at the arena and maybe even a NHL pre-season game, should create enough hype. Take the best of the rest of the national team (non-nhl) and spice it up with a 6-7 or so quality foreigners (or maybe even lure Frans Nielsen back) and you could have a decent team in 2016.

Potential Lineup:

X - X - Mads Christensen
Nicklas Hardt - X - X
Julian Jakobsen - Morten Madsen - Frederik Storm
Morten Poulsen - Jesper Jensen - Thomas Spelling
*(Kiril Starkov - Bjorkstrand - Patrick Russell)

X - X
Oliver Lauridsen - Jesper Jensen
Stefan Lassen - Markus Lauridsen
*(Simon Gronvaldt - Marco Illmann)

X
Simon Nielsen


Extras could play for a farm team in the AL-Bankligaen.
Ofcause, then there is always the question mark of ownerships/sponsorship ect. Time will tell... I guess.

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