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Old
12-29-2012, 07:39 AM
  #1
drivesrf
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new player established team

Looking for some advice/tips. I'm a beginner never played a real game with refs, time clock, etc, just open hockey. A friend and I just joined a team of guys whom we have not yet met that have been playing together for a while. Can anyone offer some tips for us??

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12-29-2012, 09:19 AM
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Beezeral
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Everyoneis going to give the tame old response of skate hard, do your best, pass the puck, etc.

While those are all good suggestions, what you should do is ask the leader of the team what he wants your role to be for that game and do exactly what he says. If he tells you to take short shifts and be very careful because you are playing a tough team, do it. If he says go out and try new things because you are playing scrubs, do it. Especially as a complete noob, your best option is to do exactly what you are told.

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12-29-2012, 09:34 AM
  #3
wahsnairb
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have fun

don't stress out about a rec league because we all had to start somewhere.. go make some friends and go play some hockey.

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12-29-2012, 07:31 PM
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I would say if time permits to try and get to know your teamates, whether that going out somewhere (ba,r coffee, dinner etc) or calling the team captain. Once at the rink I would assume the team is going to put you and your friend on the same line which will at least allow you two to be comfortable with your play together. But don't hesitate to try and figure out your other teamates play styles and be aware of their tendencies.

Thats the best advice I can give you right now.

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Old
12-30-2012, 01:19 PM
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Gomer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drivesrf View Post
Looking for some advice/tips. I'm a beginner never played a real game with refs, time clock, etc, just open hockey. A friend and I just joined a team of guys whom we have not yet met that have been playing together for a while. Can anyone offer some tips for us??
Skate hard. Take short shifts (1 minute is too long).

Don't lock into only looking at your friend to/for passing. Don't get frustrated if it seems like they don't see you out there either. They'll take some time to figure you out.

Do your best to learn names.

Talk on the ice. And that doesn't just mean calling for the puck. Let a teammate know when they have a man hot on them... or when they can take their time getting up the ice. If you play forward and you see a D man breaking deeper into the zone, tell them you have them covered. And cover them up high.

Don't do stupid things with the officials. If you don't like the call, don't chirp about it. They do and will hold a grudge that will affect your team.

Bring some beer/cookies/whatever for after the game.

Make smart line changes. Don't head to the bench when they are skating into your zone. If you've been out there for 40 seconds, and there's a faceoff in your zone, get off the ice.

Don't lollygag when you are headed to the bench. Even if there's a stoppage. The officials will drop the puck when they are ready, not when the fresh guy is. That's a huge pain for the centers because they can't get comfortable for the faceoff. If play is ongoing when you change, make some noise as you are headed over. A name if you know it, or the position if not.

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Old
12-30-2012, 01:26 PM
  #6
Raym11
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dont puck hog

take short/regular shifts

dont complain



those 3 and you'll be fine, you'll have a whole new group of buddies in no time


also hopefully you have a good grasp of how to play because it can be annoying to play with people who have no idea what they're doing even if they arent being selfish (eg. a guy who gives the puck away nonstop)

be open to constructive criticism as i imagine you'l get alot of it from the team but dont take it personal

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Old
12-30-2012, 04:30 PM
  #7
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Never turn down an opportunity to go out for a beer afterwards.

Seriously, it's more about chemistry than playing ability. Hope you end up with a team you get along with.

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Old
12-30-2012, 05:14 PM
  #8
do0glas
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As someone who just went through this in my first season:

1. Clear the puck. It sounds easy, but a lot of players don't realize when you are pinned in your zone, getting the puck out without icing it is a very underrated skill.

2. Play the boards. As a new player, putting the puck into open ice is probably your lowest percentage play. Use your boards, bank the puck...dump it even of you've already entered the zone. If you can make their D turn their backs to you by running on the boards you are playing smart.

3. Stay on the point on D! Sounds stupid, but I see wingers following the puck and it's frustrating. A lot of beer league teams are going to run their offense from the point unless they have ringers...by shadowing that guy and letting the C and defense do their thing, you not only take away an easy shot but you set yourself up for either an intercepted pass or a clean breakout to start a rush.

4. Don't be afraid to shoot. But, pick your spots. Shooting into a crowd is a sure way to give up a break away...but with a semi open lane even the worst shot can turn into a goal.

5. Lastly. Crash the net! Beer league goalies give up rebounds, so if you think there will be a shot you should be rushing the net stick down.

Hope this helps some. Good luck and have fun!

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Old
12-31-2012, 09:14 AM
  #9
drivesrf
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Thanks everyone for the great advice!

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12-31-2012, 10:05 AM
  #10
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Off ice stuff is important too, in the locker room get involved in conversations with the other guys and have a bit of banter, don't be the quiet guy who just sits there or only talk to your friend. Be committed to the team, always show up on time for practice and games.

I was in the same situation a few years ago, I finished junior hockey and went to be a backup goalie for a mens team where I didn't know anyone. I did all the little off ice things and supported the team on the bench and got the respect of all the guys. They know I'm not the best goalie and 3 seasons later I'm still the backup and only play a few games but they consider me a great team guy and that's what you want from a backup goalie.

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12-31-2012, 11:06 AM
  #11
ChiTownHawks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats View Post
Off ice stuff is important too, in the locker room get involved in conversations with the other guys and have a bit of banter, don't be the quiet guy who just sits there or only talk to your friend. Be committed to the team, always show up on time for practice and games.

I was in the same situation a few years ago, I finished junior hockey and went to be a backup goalie for a mens team where I didn't know anyone. I did all the little off ice things and supported the team on the bench and got the respect of all the guys. They know I'm not the best goalie and 3 seasons later I'm still the backup and only play a few games but they consider me a great team guy and that's what you want from a backup goalie.
Good points. When new guys join my team I usually know if I am really going to like them or not if they speak up in the locker room. I am not a huge fan of having real reserved guys on my team, b/c it seems like they are having a bad time and it kind of brings the room down. Now I would never be dick to them b/c they are quiet but after a while I also won't go out of my way to include you on non team related things.

That being said no one really expects you to be the center of attention on day 1. We all know how uncomfortable those first couple of games can be and would give you some time to warm up.

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Old
12-31-2012, 11:35 AM
  #12
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Originally Posted by ChiTownHawks View Post
Good points. When new guys join my team I usually know if I am really going to like them or not if they speak up in the locker room. I am not a huge fan of having real reserved guys on my team, b/c it seems like they are having a bad time and it kind of brings the room down. Now I would never be dick to them b/c they are quiet but after a while I also won't go out of my way to include you on non team related things.

That being said no one really expects you to be the center of attention on day 1. We all know how uncomfortable those first couple of games can be and would give you some time to warm up.
While I can see why people would see the super quiet guys as having a bad time, it's not always the case.

I'm a pretty quiet guy in general. Only really participate in conversations unless I feel I have something good to say.

But before a game, I barely speak to anyone once I have my lower pads on. It's more of a focus thing for myself. But hey, I'm just hamming up the "odd goaltender" status quo.

Really, the biggest thing are as follows:

- play hard, be humble about mistakes you make, try and learn from them
- make sure to pay up on time (this could be number 1 really)
- make an effort to get to know the guys

It's a rec league, while on the ice we all take it seriously, off the ice should be about good times.

Have fun man.

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Old
01-01-2013, 01:03 AM
  #13
Stanello
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahsnairb View Post
have fun

don't stress out about a rec league because we all had to start somewhere.. go make some friends and go play some hockey.
This guy gets it. Give it your best, hustle, short shifts, etc, but don't take yourself too seriously. Have fun, it's beer league hockey.

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Old
01-01-2013, 06:05 PM
  #14
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I'd also say realize you will make a huge mistake or do something embarrassing at some point. How you handle that mistake lets the guys you're playing with know what kind of teammate you are. Every one has made a big mistake at some point, so just try and remeber what happened, how to avoid it next time, and move on from it.

My 5th game ever I was switched to D. I had just gotten the puck and had a guy bearing down on me. I tried to get a little fancy on my escape move, couldn't keep an edge and watched the puck go right to their guy for and easy breakaway and goal while I sat on my butt. Went to the bench, told the guys my bad, and not 5 minutes later had almost the exact same thing happen. This time though I made a better decision on the escape move, made a nice pass and we had a 2 on 1.

Overall just enjoy yourself and don't take things to seriously. Have fun.

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Old
01-01-2013, 06:38 PM
  #15
Splitbtw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by do0glas View Post
As someone who just went through this in my first season:

1. Clear the puck. It sounds easy, but a lot of players don't realize when you are pinned in your zone, getting the puck out without icing it is a very underrated skill.

2. Play the boards. As a new player, putting the puck into open ice is probably your lowest percentage play. Use your boards, bank the puck...dump it even of you've already entered the zone. If you can make their D turn their backs to you by running on the boards you are playing smart.

3. Stay on the point on D! Sounds stupid, but I see wingers following the puck and it's frustrating. A lot of beer league teams are going to run their offense from the point unless they have ringers...by shadowing that guy and letting the C and defense do their thing, you not only take away an easy shot but you set yourself up for either an intercepted pass or a clean breakout to start a rush.

4. Don't be afraid to shoot. But, pick your spots. Shooting into a crowd is a sure way to give up a break away...but with a semi open lane even the worst shot can turn into a goal.

5. Lastly. Crash the net! Beer league goalies give up rebounds, so if you think there will be a shot you should be rushing the net stick down.

Hope this helps some. Good luck and have fun!

As far as on the ice goes, this stuff.

Don't be the reason your team loses in the D zone, know your role/abilities and don't try to do too much too often, don't be unpleasant to be around on the bench or in the locker room and try hard.

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Old
01-02-2013, 03:02 PM
  #16
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bring beer often. the rest will take care of itself.

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