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The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

Tell me a story about oldtime hockey

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Old
06-11-2006, 08:09 PM
  #1
Flash Walken
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Tell me a story about oldtime hockey

This is a story from Denis Potvin's Legends of Hockey.

His first NHL game against the Atlanta Flames, he arrives in Atlanta, and has the wrong coloured helmet. Despite everything he had learned about protecting yourself first, he was the rookie who wouldn't want to speak up, he played his first period in the NHL without his helmet, scared to death.

Stan Fischler:

"If it was up to Denis Potvin, he would've done exactly what bobby orr did, and that was spending his entire playing lifetime in the other end of the rink going for goals, setting up goals. Denis Potvin would've been to Mike Bossy and Bryan Trottier what Bobby Orr was to Phil Esposito and Kenny Hodge. There was one major difference: Al Arbour. It was the irresistable force versus the immovable object. Al Arbour would not move, so the irresistable force moved just enough to the right and it was a happy blend. Denis Potvin becomes a hall of famer, and not like bobby orr, Potvin played in his own end."

Pretty interesting summation.

So someone else tell me a story about hockey from the good old days.

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Old
06-11-2006, 09:01 PM
  #2
MiamiScreamingEagles
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Bob Baun from the 1964 Stanley Cup Finals. He was taken off the ice on a stretcher but returned for the OT.

http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...p?player=11937

Baun's career-making night was the sixth game of the 1964 Stanley Cup final, with Baun playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs against Detroit. Baun describes what happened halfway through the third period with the score tied 3-3 at the Detroit Olympia: "I got hit in the foot by a shot by Gordie Howe, so they took me to the Olympia infirmary. The guys who looked at it didn't think I could hurt it any more than I already had, so they froze it and I went back to play the game," recalls Baun, who had to be taken from the ice on a stretcher. "I knew it was broken; I didn't need any X-rays to tell me that. But I didn't want to miss the overtime. I told the trainer he had to do everything possible to get me out there. He gave me a shot of painkiller, which numbed the ankle, and taped it tight. Then I laced up my skate and went back to the bench."

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06-11-2006, 09:49 PM
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Masao
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Vsevolod Bobrov could shoot the puck through the net's meshings because his shot was so hard

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06-11-2006, 10:19 PM
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1969: 34 year-old Bob Barlow cracks an NHL roster for the first time, making the North Stars out of camp.

On his first shift, Barlow scores his first NHL goal.

Skating back to the bench, Bobby quips "What's so hard about this league?"

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06-11-2006, 11:03 PM
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arrbez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Masao Kishin
Vsevolod Bobrov could shoot the puck through the net's meshings because his shot was so hard
And that wasn't the bloated capitalist mesh of today either. Back when men were men and nets were nets.

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Old
06-11-2006, 11:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arrbez
And that wasn't the bloated capitalist mesh of today either. Back when men were men and nets were nets.

arrbez is a COMRADE!

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06-12-2006, 04:31 PM
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Big Phil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flash Walken
Denis Potvin becomes a hall of famer, and not like bobby orr, Potvin played in his own end."
.

I cant understand if thats a knock on Orr or not. Potvin was a great defenseman no doubt about it, possibly in the top 5 ever. But what was Stan Fischler trying to say? That Orr didnt play in his own end? I can see where its coming from since Fischler is about as smart as a bucket of shrimp.

Orr did play in his own end. He was the greatest defenseman ever and played an all around game. Geez even Paul Coffey played in his own end. Both of these guys just had the speed to get back to their own end.

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06-12-2006, 08:28 PM
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reckoning
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil
I cant understand if thats a knock on Orr or not. Potvin was a great defenseman no doubt about it, possibly in the top 5 ever. But what was Stan Fischler trying to say? That Orr didnt play in his own end? I can see where its coming from since Fischler is about as smart as a bucket of shrimp.

Orr did play in his own end. He was the greatest defenseman ever and played an all around game. Geez even Paul Coffey played in his own end. Both of these guys just had the speed to get back to their own end.
Fischler used to slag Orr a lot in his columns back in the 70s. His standard phrase would be like "Don`t get me wrong, Orr is an immemsely talented player...BUT... he`s not good at this, he`s not good at that, blah, blah, blah". He`d briefly give Orr credit for about two sentences, then spend 20 paragraphs explaining how Ed Van Impe or Bill White were better defensively.


Last edited by reckoning: 06-12-2006 at 08:34 PM.
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Old
06-12-2006, 08:35 PM
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Slats432
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil

Orr did play in his own end. He was the greatest defenseman ever and played an all around game. Geez even Paul Coffey played in his own end. Both of these guys just had the speed to get back to their own end.
Being an oldtimer, I can concur about Bobby Orr, but not Paul Coffey. Great offensively, average defensively.

There was a great many times he was called Paul Cough-up. That said he was probably as good as any defenseman offensively save Orr.

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06-13-2006, 11:25 AM
  #10
MiamiScreamingEagles
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Rick MacLeish's odyssey from 1976-1978:

In February 1976, his season (regular season and playoffs) abruptly ended on a check by Harold Snepsts resulting in torn knee ligaments.

In May 1977, he was involved in a vehicle accident as the van he was driving turned over multiple times on a wet highway, with teammate Bob Dailey as a passenger, resulting in a broken vertebrae in his neck, and other injuries, requiring him to wear a body cast for three months.

But on April 1, 1978, maybe the worst. In game at Los Angeles, his throat was slashed accidentally by Marcel Dionne's skate blade. The scene was described as you might expect. A puddle of blood on the ice, blood oozing out, every available towel turning red, etc. Afterwards, MacLeish is quoted as saying he had a cigarette and smoke came out of the sides of his neck. The cut required 80 stitches. But he returned with fortitude appearing later that month for the beginning of the playoffs, played in all of the Flyers' 12 playoff games, and led the team in goals (7), assists (9), and points (16).

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06-13-2006, 12:48 PM
  #11
Chili
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The Stanley Cup that wasn't decided...



Quote:
The Montreal Gazette. -- (April 2, 1919). -- P.14

Seven of the Canadiens and Owner George Kennedy Stricken With "Flu"
Seattle, April 1. -- Definite and final announcement was made by the Arena management at 2.30 p.m. that there will be no more world series games here this year. At noon today workmen started tearing up the Arena ice floor preparatory to converting the building into a roller skating rink.

The fact that the ice was being taken up settled all arguments as to whether or not the series would be continued if the visitors were able later to put enough men on the ice.

Lalonde, Berlanquette, Couture and Kennedy are reported only slightly ill. Last night the remaining four men came down, leaving only Pitre, Cleghorn and Vezina, who are not afflicted. It is believed here the Canadiens contracted the disease in Victoria, where the players of that team are just recovering from influenza, seven of them having been in bed at one time.

Not in the history of the Stanley Cup series has the world's hockey championship been so beset with hard luck as has this one. Of the 19 players engaged in it, hardly one of them has gone through without some bad luck. The Seattle team has been badly battered, Rowe, Foyston, Wilson, Murray and Walker all having had injuries. Corbeau, the great Canadien defence man, was hurt in the very first game and has not been able to do more than substitute since.

The great overtime games of the series have taxed the vitality of the players to such an extent that they are in poor shape indeed to fight off such a disease as influenza. However, the Canadiens are being given the very best of care, nurses and physicians being in attendance at all times on them and every other attention is being shown the stricken players.
A few days later Joe Hall of the Habs passed away.

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Old
06-13-2006, 01:00 PM
  #12
ClassicHockey
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Interesting thing about Bob Barlow.

He was the left wing on the famous 'CBC' line in Junior hockey along with Brian & Barry Cullen and won the Memorial Cup with St. Catharines in 1954.

Barlow probably could have had a good NHL career but he preferred to play his career in the minors. Some players get comfortable and don't want the pressure with playing in the NHL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bugg
1969: 34 year-old Bob Barlow cracks an NHL roster for the first time, making the North Stars out of camp.

On his first shift, Barlow scores his first NHL goal.

Skating back to the bench, Bobby quips "What's so hard about this league?"

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Old
06-13-2006, 01:01 PM
  #13
ClassicHockey
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I'm not sure if it was Fischler or not but one critical writer thought that Bobby Orr couldn't skate backwards. Orr got a laugh out of that one. I think Fischler says things just to be controversial and couldn't possibly believe everything he writes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by reckoning
Fischler used to slag Orr a lot in his columns back in the 70s. His standard phrase would be like "Don`t get me wrong, Orr is an immemsely talented player...BUT... he`s not good at this, he`s not good at that, blah, blah, blah". He`d briefly give Orr credit for about two sentences, then spend 20 paragraphs explaining how Ed Van Impe or Bill White were better defensively.

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Old
06-13-2006, 01:27 PM
  #14
Psycho Papa Joe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flash Walken
Stan Fischler:

"If it was up to Denis Potvin, he would've done exactly what bobby orr did, and that was spending his entire playing lifetime in the other end of the rink going for goals, setting up goals. Denis Potvin would've been to Mike Bossy and Bryan Trottier what Bobby Orr was to Phil Esposito and Kenny Hodge. There was one major difference: Al Arbour. It was the irresistable force versus the immovable object. Al Arbour would not move, so the irresistable force moved just enough to the right and it was a happy blend. Denis Potvin becomes a hall of famer, and not like bobby orr, Potvin played in his own end."
Stan Fischler is an idiot.

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Old
06-13-2006, 05:01 PM
  #15
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Fischler has been spouting utter garbage for more than 40 years. His column in The Hockey News back in the 1970's was unreadable, filled with factual errors and misinformed opinions at every turn. Every year he picked the Rangers to win the Cup, and pretty much every week he fawned over Mike Milbury - had to mention what a great guy he was in almost every column. Believe me, Pierre McGuire has nothing on Fischler when it comes to man crushes, Fischler practically invented it.

Orr was more than capable in his own end. Potvin couldn't tie Orr's skates when it came to natural ability - Potvin was outstanding but Orr has no peer IMO - if he hadn't be burdedned with 20 kenee surgeries Orr would have been able to play into the 90's, and there'd be little question about who was the greatest of all time. That's coming from an old-time Habs fan BTW, I used to hate him (in a competitive sense).

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Old
06-13-2006, 09:08 PM
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Bachul
Being an oldtimer, I can concur about Bobby Orr, but not Paul Coffey. Great offensively, average defensively.

There was a great many times he was called Paul Cough-up. That said he was probably as good as any defenseman offensively save Orr.

Personally, I think calling Coffey "Average" in his own zone is very, very generous

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