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kids using outside edge instead of inside

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01-13-2013, 10:07 PM
  #1
600bandit
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kids using outside edge instead of inside

I coach a team of 5 and 6 year olds, 2 of them skate on there outside edge on there right foot, while going forward in a straight line, i'm sure they'll out grow it but any Ideas to help them out, it's there first and second year skating so some drills like gliding on one leg inside edges are a little hard for them to do, we've tried to explain to them to push with the inside edge but it's hard for them to understand, any help. thanks

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01-14-2013, 02:12 AM
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Crosbyfan
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Originally Posted by 600bandit View Post
I coach a team of 5 and 6 year olds, 2 of them skate on there outside edge on there right foot, while going forward in a straight line, i'm sure they'll out grow it but any Ideas to help them out, it's there first and second year skating so some drills like gliding on one leg inside edges are a little hard for them to do, we've tried to explain to them to push with the inside edge but it's hard for them to understand, any help. thanks
Have you tried them:

1. pushing with both inside edges, and scraping the ice back, while stationary against the boards for support

2. same as 1, but pushing a teammate (teammate facing them) with mild resistance, so moving forward

3. pushing with the inside edge (of right skate in this case) while balancing on the other leg with stick on the ice for a little extra support.

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01-14-2013, 06:01 AM
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Have you tried them:

1. pushing with both inside edges, and scraping the ice back, while stationary against the boards for support2. same as 1, but pushing a teammate (teammate facing them) with mild resistance, so moving forward

3. pushing with the inside edge (of right skate in this case) while balancing on the other leg with stick on the ice for a little extra support.
This. We did this drill for the first few weeks during my sons Learn to Play/Skate class. So far so good.

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01-14-2013, 08:14 AM
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noobman
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Do their skates fit properly? Do they have supination of the feet?

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01-14-2013, 09:26 AM
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AIREAYE
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Do their skates fit properly? Do they have supination of the feet?
Exactly what I was thinking.

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01-15-2013, 01:46 PM
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600bandit
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thanks for the advice I'll try some of the drills, this week, the kids aren't mine but I'll ask the parents to check for that supination

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01-15-2013, 02:51 PM
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Jarick
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Gotta check the skates that they fit properly.

Otherwise, are their feet not wide enough apart? It's hard to skate on your outside edge with the feet apart.

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01-16-2013, 01:05 PM
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GrafSk8r12
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Just teach them how to skate like Bure

Vancouver Canucks conditioning coach Peter Twist noticed during Bure's rehabilitation period following his first major knee injury in 1995, that his skating style was particularly unique in comparison to typical North American players. He explained, "Most players skate on their inside edge and push off at a 45-degree angle, but Bure starts on his outer edge and rolls over to his inside edge and pushes back straighter on his stride ... he gets more power and force in his stride to get up to top speed quicker."

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01-16-2013, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by GrafSk8r12 View Post
Just teach them how to skate like Bure

Vancouver Canucks conditioning coach Peter Twist noticed during Bure's rehabilitation period following his first major knee injury in 1995, that his skating style was particularly unique in comparison to typical North American players. He explained, "Most players skate on their inside edge and push off at a 45-degree angle, but Bure starts on his outer edge and rolls over to his inside edge and pushes back straighter on his stride ... he gets more power and force in his stride to get up to top speed quicker."

just thinking about that seems uncomfortable...

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01-18-2013, 09:22 AM
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madmutter
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Tell them to "walk like a duck" in their skates. Having their toes pointed out wide naturally has them on their inside edges, as they take a step they will naturally glide forward a bit and before you know it they are skating forward with a basic stride. I've used this to get several kids to move from the walking on the ice in skates phase to the forward momentum phase of learning to skate but I can definitely see it working with a player who has some skating skills but needs to move to their inside edges more.

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04-30-2014, 09:57 PM
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Kd doing the same

Did you get this figured out? My son is almost 5 and doing the same. Let me know if you found any solutions.

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05-01-2014, 09:23 AM
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soireeculturelle
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Look at their street shoes. IF the wear is all on the outer side of the sole, then it's a foot alignment issue. if not, then it's technique or the skate boot that's too big or too soft.

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05-01-2014, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by 600bandit View Post
I coach a team of 5 and 6 year olds, 2 of them skate on there outside edge on there right foot, while going forward in a straight line, i'm sure they'll out grow it but any Ideas to help them out, it's there first and second year skating so some drills like gliding on one leg inside edges are a little hard for them to do, we've tried to explain to them to push with the inside edge but it's hard for them to understand, any help. thanks
I also coach this age group and have for 9 of the past 10 years. Do a couple drills to work on using all edges.

1. Have them line up on the blue line and skate hard, gliding around the bottom of the face off circle. Once for each edge - right inside, left inside, left outside, left inside.

2. another is a variation of the circles. Skating counter clockwise on the circle, using left foot to propel while right foot is gliding the left foot has to come behind the gliding foot and great effort is required to dig that blade into the ice and give a good push to keep momentum going.

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05-01-2014, 10:27 AM
  #14
McDugan
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Maybe a sharpening issue? Are they both getting their skates sharpened at the same place?

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05-01-2014, 12:16 PM
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tmway84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madmutter View Post
Tell them to "walk like a duck" in their skates. Having their toes pointed out wide naturally has them on their inside edges, as they take a step they will naturally glide forward a bit and before you know it they are skating forward with a basic stride. I've used this to get several kids to move from the walking on the ice in skates phase to the forward momentum phase of learning to skate but I can definitely see it working with a player who has some skating skills but needs to move to their inside edges more.
hmmm....I never thought about the whole walk like a duck idea, I shall remember this for the next time i am volunteering at the rink. Very neat concept!

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11-23-2015, 06:02 AM
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exspwo
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supination

My son has the same problem right now, He's 5 years old and we skate 2nd season, but he still has the problem of skating using outside edge instead of inside. He can't do drills and can't skate fast and phisically is not able to skate using inside edge like normally do others. Our coach doesn't know what to do he says he has never faced this kind of a problem before, actually my son is the first kid who skates like this in our sports school practice. The coach doesn't even know which exercises could help my son to correct edge control. We will try to use those drills written here, may be the situation will change soon. We've tried 5 kinds of skates, none of them made a difference, we've passed medical examinations, all the doctors said we have no problems with bones. But then I found information about kinds of pronation and obviously my son has supination. And still I have no answers about the reasons and ways to help my son. Coach advices us to quit hockey. I'm going to change another pair of skates, this time I want to try thermoformable ones and may be we will try massage and new drills.
Thereby, please could anyone write about successful experience of solving the outside edge problem? And is there any chance to solve the problem if my child has supination?

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11-23-2015, 06:18 AM
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
Do their skates fit properly? Do they have supination of the feet?
Mine always used to do this. I used to mess with it while we were standing around waiting for drills. Yeah, I know it's not healthy.

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11-23-2015, 11:57 AM
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daddyohsix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exspwo View Post
My son has the same problem right now, He's 5 years old and we skate 2nd season, but he still has the problem of skating using outside edge instead of inside. He can't do drills and can't skate fast and phisically is not able to skate using inside edge like normally do others. Our coach doesn't know what to do he says he has never faced this kind of a problem before, actually my son is the first kid who skates like this in our sports school practice. The coach doesn't even know which exercises could help my son to correct edge control. We will try to use those drills written here, may be the situation will change soon. We've tried 5 kinds of skates, none of them made a difference, we've passed medical examinations, all the doctors said we have no problems with bones. But then I found information about kinds of pronation and obviously my son has supination. And still I have no answers about the reasons and ways to help my son. Coach advices us to quit hockey. I'm going to change another pair of skates, this time I want to try thermoformable ones and may be we will try massage and new drills.
Thereby, please could anyone write about successful experience of solving the outside edge problem? And is there any chance to solve the problem if my child has supination?
Be patient. As the kids get older (about 7 years old in my experience) the ankles get strong enough to control their positioning (while at younger ages a lot of it is simply dependent on the boot - stiffness, how tightly tied etc).

Not sure if this would work, but I did this with ohnine: in public skate, get them to simply stand in a wider stance on inside edges and hold that position. Then position yourself behind them, hold them under the armpits and skate them around the ice. This allows them to get the feel of gliding on both inside edges. Its a little tricky to not trip over them, I usually would just do tight alternating c-cuts, don't do it unless you are a good skater. And don't actually pick them up off the ice as you are doing this, the rink people get really upset.

Finally, put them in community centre skating lessons. These instructors spend all their time teaching young kids to skate, have probably seen it lots of times, and know how to correct it. Hockey coaches really vary in their ability to teach skating, especially at the youngest ages.

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11-24-2015, 09:42 AM
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sanityplease
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Wondering about stance?

As others have mentioned, what happens when he is in the ready/safe/basic position (knees bent, legs apart, back bent forward near a 45 degree angle & hands/elbows on legs just above the knees)? A common problem is when a child develops too much of an upright stance. A child who starts early with using more of a crouched position (within the first 5 lessons), will often take a bit more time to get really mobile/fast (they also fatigue quicker). But, when they do get moving better they are using proper stance & will often quickly develop beyond the more upright skaters. Stopping, skating backwards, turning, etc, etc, are a lot easier for kids who use proper stance as they are more stable.

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11-24-2015, 12:59 PM
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I could never properly skate due to issues with my arches. One of my feet suffers minor supination, and the other suffers pronation. Every single pair of skates I ever wore were incredibly painful after 5 minutes of skating or so (even at the casual skates at local arenas). Some peoples' feet just aren't meant for skating, but I would definitely see if orthotics could help. Is there an orthopedist that specializes in skate orthotics?

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11-26-2015, 03:35 AM
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biturbo19
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I honestly don't know what to say here...

5-6 age group, my parents made sure i was in powerskating classes before i was even allowed to play hockey. I'd do the same for any kid of mine. I think it's important to emphasize the skating early, and before getting into the details of actual hockey as a game...but with kids that young it's not easy to correct technical flaws. Repetition is probably the best weapon there. But ultimately, it's probably more of a separation of the natural skaters from the others who will have to work at it immensely over time.

idk, maybe i'm out to lunch...but it seems as though some kids just "get it" with skating more than others and are "natural skaters". With others...it's a process...that probably doesn't start to get super urgent at 5-6 years old just yet.

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11-26-2015, 09:29 AM
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sanityplease
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I honestly don't know what to say here...



idk, maybe i'm out to lunch...but it seems as though some kids just "get it" with skating more than others and are "natural skaters". With others...it's a process...that probably doesn't start to get super urgent at 5-6 years old just yet.
I work with kids of this age group (learn to skate) & IP (4 to 6 year olds) & have off and on for twenty years.

Some definitely 'get it' quicker than others. But when all kids are taught a formal program & developed 'professionally', there is very little difference between the best & worst. & most of the difference is due to strength & physical development. A strong kid has a more powerful stride & can get up quicker etc., a child who is more 'slight' will typically not have as much power. Saying that, the smaller children will usually develop edgework/agility quicker.

The most common development issue that I experience, is when a child has never been taught/developed two of the critical basics: Getting up off of the ice, & using a proper stance. In a typical learn to skate program, they are both introduced by the 1st to 3rd ice time. A child who hasn't adopted a proper stance, simply can't move on to more advanced techniques.

Severe foot issues do exist in children, but I have only seen it twice in twenty years (anecdotal I know). One of the kids went on to play competitive hockey (had really bad supination/underpronation & walked really bow legged, still does as an adult, but still plays high level industrial hockey), the other child had a swelling in the foot & never played organized hockey but did become a very effective pick-up hockey player.

Out of 20+ kids in a learn to skate or IP hockey group, there are literally 2-5 kids who have stance issues that look like supination, but they all have too much of an upright stance & it is corrected when they adopt the basic/ready/safe position consistently. The hardest situations to correct are with the kids who have learned from a parent for a year or two with really plateaued development, before joining learn to skate or IP.


Last edited by sanityplease: 11-26-2015 at 09:37 AM.
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