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Old vs Modern Goalie W-L records

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01-30-2013, 08:30 AM
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BM67
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Old vs Modern Goalie W-L records

The old goaltending records leave one wondering what was the standard for awarding wins and losses in split games. It obviously isn't the modern standard of whoever was in net when the winning goal was scored.

Of course this is further complicated by the non-recording of some of the split games, such as in 1930-31 where only 2 of the 7 split games made it into the official record.

Goalies serving there own penalties is one thing that doesn't have a modern standard to use.

Some examples:

Chabot takes a penalty 4 minutes into the game and Boston scores 3 times on the PP, and wins the game 6-2. Clancy gave up the winning goal. Should he get the loss? Should Chabot still be the goalie of record?

Rollins and Broda split a 0-0 tie. One goalie got the tie and the other got the shutout. Obviously no such thing as a shared shutout at the time.

The starter leaves after the first period with the score 0-0. The relief goalie gives up both goals in a 2-0 loss, but doesn't get a loss on his record. Is this an error, or the standard of the day?

Of course to apply the standard of the day, one has to know what that standard is, and when it changes. When was the first shared shutout recorded officially anyway?

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01-30-2013, 09:22 AM
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Canadiens1958
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Standards

Quote:
Originally Posted by BM67 View Post
The old goaltending records leave one wondering what was the standard for awarding wins and losses in split games. It obviously isn't the modern standard of whoever was in net when the winning goal was scored.

Of course this is further complicated by the non-recording of some of the split games, such as in 1930-31 where only 2 of the 7 split games made it into the official record.

Goalies serving there own penalties is one thing that doesn't have a modern standard to use.

Some examples:

Chabot takes a penalty 4 minutes into the game and Boston scores 3 times on the PP, and wins the game 6-2. Clancy gave up the winning goal. Should he get the loss? Should Chabot still be the goalie of record?

Rollins and Broda split a 0-0 tie. One goalie got the tie and the other got the shutout. Obviously no such thing as a shared shutout at the time.

The starter leaves after the first period with the score 0-0. The relief goalie gives up both goals in a 2-0 loss, but doesn't get a loss on his record. Is this an error, or the standard of the day?

Of course to apply the standard of the day, one has to know what that standard is, and when it changes. When was the first shared shutout recorded officially anyway?
Standards started with the Ron Andrews era at the NHL in the sixties.

Until Jim Hendy there were very loose definitions of standards. Standards were gradually tightened until Ron Andrews came along and streamlined procedures and definitions.

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