HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > NHL Eastern Conference > Atlantic Division > Toronto Maple Leafs
Notices

James Reimer Discussion Thread.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
01-30-2013, 02:41 PM
  #126
Leo Trollmarov
I was in the pool!!
 
Leo Trollmarov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Toronto
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,543
vCash: 500
I'd love to see a list of where goals are scored by %. I am willing to bet over 70 % will be 5 hole or glove side. Those are the spots most players shoot. Even lefties like to shoot glove.

Leo Trollmarov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 02:49 PM
  #127
diceman934
Registered User
 
diceman934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NHL player factory
Posts: 5,416
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alflives View Post
Here is where you are certainly wrong on both accounts:

GAP is that space between your D and your forwards in the neutral zone: A large gap leaves too much space for the other team's players. This is why D stay up (between the dots) and backchecking forwards apply back pressure on the puck carrier. A proper gap also allows the team to transition from defense to offense (in the neutral zone) quickly, when there is a turn-over. Defense-men backing up too quickly, or forwards not backchecking quickly enough creates the gap.

Now, why do you feel the Leaf's D back up too quickly? That's correct. They lack confidence in their goalies.

If Phaneuf's muscle fibre was tested, he would have a lot more fast twitch than slow twitch. He not only has quick feet, he has quick hands too.


Nope......you could not be any more wrong.

Maybe reading what a HOF says about gap control will convince you!
http://www.usahockeymagazine.com/art...u-dictate-play

Or how about a you tube video......

As for Dions fast twitch muscle fibre muscle that has nothing to do with his skating technique while transitioning from forward to backwards etc....I already said he was fast going forward.....that is not the issue. He has at best average feet.

diceman934 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 02:59 PM
  #128
marty111
Registered User
 
marty111's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,555
vCash: 500
If we want to make some constructive criticisms I'd like to see him swallow up shots and reduce his rebounds a bit and develop a game playing the puck outside the net. He reminds me a Cujo a bit, his puck handling and decision making skills are fairly weak outside the blue paint.

marty111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:04 PM
  #129
Alflives
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,374
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by diceman934 View Post
Nope......you could not be any more wrong.

As for Dions fast twitch muscle fibre muscle that has nothing to do with his skating technique while transitioning from forward to backwards etc....I already said he was fast going forward.....that is not the issue. He has at best average feet.
Thank you for the video; it only supports my point. Notice the backchecking forward putting pressure on the puck carrier, allowing the defense-men to stay up. Notice also the small-gap created between the backchecking forwards (all of them) and the D. It's the gap between teammates that is important. It needs to be small to create support in both defense and offense.

Notice also the D are between the dots!

For Phaneuf: Quick feet means quick turns, transition and acceleration.

The Leafs' issue is the goaltending. Look what the poor goaltending is doing to Jake Gardiner's development. Look what it did to Luke Schenn. It's even having a negative affect on a great player like Phaneuf!


Last edited by Alflives: 01-30-2013 at 03:06 PM. Reason: grammar
Alflives is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:15 PM
  #130
SSoH
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 213
vCash: 500
What i find more problematic is that every time the puck is behind the next he is constantly lost. Always on his knees and going from post to post is a problem for him watch the games when he moves side to side i cringe.

As for his glove he's a butterfly goalie obviously when he goes down shooters are going to go high.

SSoH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:23 PM
  #131
81Leafs50
Registered User
 
81Leafs50's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Toronto
Country: Canada
Posts: 910
vCash: 500
Reimer has already made a lot of great glove saves this season.

Glove high is a weakness for a lot of goalies.

Example number 1, Ryan Miller last night.

Case closed. fined something else to complain about.

81Leafs50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:24 PM
  #132
The Kessel Run
Registered User
 
The Kessel Run's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,956
vCash: 500
Reimer has been very good so far this year - no reason to *****...for now.

The Kessel Run is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:27 PM
  #133
diceman934
Registered User
 
diceman934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NHL player factory
Posts: 5,416
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alflives View Post
Thank you for the video; it only supports my point. Notice the backchecking forward putting pressure on the puck carrier, allowing the defense-men to stay up. Notice also the small-gap created between the backchecking forwards (all of them) and the D. It's the gap between teammates that is important. It needs to be small to create support in both defense and offense.

Notice also the D are between the dots!

For Phaneuf: Quick feet means quick turns, transition and acceleration.

The Leafs' issue is the goaltending. Look what the poor goaltending is doing to Jake Gardiner's development. Look what it did to Luke Schenn. It's even having a negative affect on a great player like Phaneuf!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alflives View Post
Dion is a big guy. One can't compare his skating to a smaller sized player. For his size, he is very agile, and the Leafs are fortunate to have him.

Gap control is a neutral zone issue, and is about the separation between team-mates, not opponents.
You stated wrongly that Gap control is about the separation between team mates , not opponents.

You were wrong....sorry. I understand the game very well thank you and my posts were in response to your belief that Gap control is not about the opponent with the puck and the D man who is defending the rush.

Also this : Now, why do you feel the Leaf's D back up too quickly? That's correct. They lack confidence in their goalies.

Which is it.....the lack of back pressure or the bad goaltending that causes Dion to maintain a good gap? I say because he lacks the ability to maintain a close gap as he fears getting beat....he is busy defending the ice behind him when it is vastly more important to protect the ice in front of you as a D man.


Last edited by diceman934: 01-30-2013 at 03:37 PM.
diceman934 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:38 PM
  #134
diceman934
Registered User
 
diceman934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NHL player factory
Posts: 5,416
vCash: 500
Now back to Reimer.....his biggest issue right now is tracking the puck better. Then he can work on the other adjustments.

diceman934 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:51 PM
  #135
Alflives
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,374
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by diceman934 View Post
You stated wrongly that Gap control is about the separation between team mates , not opponents.

.
If you were coaching a team, how would you teach Gap control? I hope you would tell your players to keep the gaps between them small, espcially in the neutral zone between forwards and D in all collection/ re-grouping drills. When watching the next game, look at the neutral zone gaps closely.

But, we are beating a dead horse.

The real problem is the Leaf's need a goalie. Then all these other issues go bye-bye.

Alflives is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 03:59 PM
  #136
diceman934
Registered User
 
diceman934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NHL player factory
Posts: 5,416
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alflives View Post
If you were coaching a team, how would you teach Gap control? I hope you would tell your players to keep the gaps between them small, espcially in the neutral zone between forwards and D in all collection/ re-grouping drills. When watching the next game, look at the neutral zone gaps closely.

But, we are beating a dead horse.

The real problem is the Leaf's need a goalie. Then all these other issues go bye-bye.
I have coached more then my share of teams....in fact I get to watch some of the players I coached on TV......and it is not If I'm coaching a team.

diceman934 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 04:05 PM
  #137
Alflives
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,374
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by diceman934 View Post
I have coached more then my share of teams....in fact I get to watch some of the players I coached on TV......and it is not If I'm coaching a team.
Good for you volunteering to coach kids. For that I applaud. We should all do so much.

Alflives is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 04:20 PM
  #138
Phatic
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 424
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcleex View Post
Two goals tonight scored on Reimer were high glove, and it seems like a lot of players always try to shoot there

Is this the only thing stopping Reimer from being a star goalie?
well now that this has been analyzed to death from one perspective, lets consider another shall we.

how about players are shooting high glove because players shoot high glove! holy **** its genious isnt it. imagine a hockey player targeting a goaltender up high AND to the glove side... I never would have thought Id see the day.

edit: if theres one thing id like to see improved, it would be his ability to track the puck behind the net. he looks like a lost puppy when play is behind him. i know its tough to make a save when a pass comes from behind you, but it would give him a jump to close the gap and cut the angle.


Last edited by Phatic: 01-30-2013 at 04:27 PM.
Phatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 07:45 PM
  #139
spidergoalie
Registered User
 
spidergoalie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Kamloops, BC, Canada
Country: Canada
Posts: 921
vCash: 500
The vast majority of shots are low. Thus goalies focus on taking away the bottom of the net, and thus goal scoring has tended to go down for a few years.

Most shooters don't have the time and space to try to pick corners, and just try to put it on net.
Ask shooters.
However if they have time and space, sure they will try to pick corners. Every goalie in the league has a great butterfly, so obviously it makes sense to try to go upstairs.

The idea that we just need a better goalie and these issues go "bye bye" is simply not true.
Any team D that allows the opposition time and space is going to allow more goals. Keep the opposition shooting from the outside and your goalies will have an easier time, no matter who the goalie is. This is part of why keeping Ron Wilson was for me, Burke's biggest failure.
Until the team is better, I don't think it will matter who the goalie is. They will let in goals, and this fan base will live and die on every win and loss, and place unrealistic expectation on whoever the goalie is.

High glove vs low glove

The fashion these days is a fingers up glove position. Sometimes this is confused with a high glove.
Imagine looking at the goalie from the pucks POV on the ice.
From the pucks POV roughly from the hashmarks in, the goalies waist-mid torso is crossbar level when in a ready stance.
If the goalie has his glove high like Scrivens, from the pucks POV it is actually above the crossbar in his stance. However a goalie with a fingers up position like Rinne or Price for example, will have the glove below the crossbar in their stance.
(Now how often is a save made in a goalies stance? Almost never. 95% of saves the goalie will be on one or both knees, so even a high glove will be below the crossbar from the puck's POV.)

The advantage of a fingers up position, is the glove can move in a straight line to catch a high shot. In a more traditional fingers to the side glove position, the arm has to arc to make a high save.

The advantage of a traditional position, is the glove can move in a straight line to catch a medium to low shot. In a fingers up or high glove position, the arm has to arc to make a low save.

It's kind of 6 of one half a dozen of the other. You either arc up, or you arc down.

However since most shots (like 70% or more) are towards the bottom half of the net still, I favour the traditional position Reimer, and most older goalies like Luongo, Giguere and Belfour use(d).
If you watch them closely, you will see fingers up/high glove goalies arcing down as they butterfly, far more frequently than you will see traditional glove position goalies arcing up to make a big glove save.
(If you watch in slow-mo you will also see that in a huge number of flashy windmill glove saves, the puck actually entered the glove in a low or medium height, and then the goalie windmills up after the catch is already made)

Scriven's glove position I think is just a poor choice, but if it works for him who am I to argue?

Personally I am now at a place where I would like to see Reimer as the starter with a veteran back-up.

spidergoalie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-30-2013, 07:48 PM
  #140
hockeygeek
Rejisturd User
 
hockeygeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,205
vCash: 500
It would be nice if someone actually provided some evidence on Reimers weak glove hand. Is it real or is it media generated? I've never seen anyone provide any facts that shows he lets in a higher than average amount of glove side goals

hockeygeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 01:19 AM
  #141
mcleex
Registered User
 
mcleex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,065
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeygeek View Post
It would be nice if someone actually provided some evidence on Reimers weak glove hand. Is it real or is it media generated? I've never seen anyone provide any facts that shows he lets in a higher than average amount of glove side goals


look at how the announcer even mentions how Spezza was aiming for it

yea yea I know "perfect shot" sure, but these perfect shots on the high glove tend to happen more often than not on Reimer

mcleex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 08:52 AM
  #142
diceman934
Registered User
 
diceman934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NHL player factory
Posts: 5,416
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcleex View Post


look at how the announcer even mentions how Spezza was aiming for it

yea yea I know "perfect shot" sure, but these perfect shots on the high glove tend to happen more often than not on Reimer
There is lots of proof.....many goals scored high glove. All that you have to do is look at his glove position on the goals that he gives up high glove.....that is an issue. His lack of not knowing were the puck is, is far worse and more of a concern.

diceman934 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 09:00 AM
  #143
Hounsy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: A wonderful location
Posts: 1,550
vCash: 559
Did that example go off Schenn's stick?

Either way Reimer's biggest issues on that goal is he is not square to the shot and is off the angle at the same time. But he was clearly a mental disaster with his game post head injury last year and thinking to much about what he should be doing and ending up a step behind and slow from where he should be both in body position and on the ice location. High glove I can live with if he fixes that other stuff and as Spider mentioned hopefully the team cuts down the opportunities the opposition has to T up and take aim.


Last edited by Hounsy: 01-31-2013 at 09:32 AM.
Hounsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 05:38 PM
  #144
hockeygeek
Rejisturd User
 
hockeygeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,205
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcleex View Post


look at how the announcer even mentions how Spezza was aiming for it

yea yea I know "perfect shot" sure, but these perfect shots on the high glove tend to happen more often than not on Reimer
Not the hard evidence I was looking for. If you've watched moneyball you would know what I mean. Do the numbers support it or is it just a few hockey guys said it so it must be the way it is. I would like to see numbers that prove he lets in a higher number of shots per shots taken glove side over the competition, otherwise I think it's just that bs sports mentality

hockeygeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 05:57 PM
  #145
firstemperor
Registered User
 
firstemperor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,455
vCash: 500
It's mind boggling how many leaf fans refuse to be objective and continue to defend his glove.

Let's not pretend that Reimer has even an average glove at this level of play. Forget comparing him to the elite. You compound that with his poor positioning at times, lack of recovery, inability to control rebounds. etc. etc. you have a fundamentally flawed goaltender.

Am I hopeful he can turn it around? Yes. But to argue otherwise is extremely difficult. Let's at least try to be objective guys.

firstemperor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 07:11 PM
  #146
RogerRoeper*
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 21,694
vCash: 500
The negativity on this site is annoying. Reimer has been very good.

He was expected to be a joke by the majority of people on here.

RogerRoeper* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 07:50 PM
  #147
hockeygeek
Rejisturd User
 
hockeygeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,205
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by firstemperor View Post
It's mind boggling how many leaf fans refuse to be objective and continue to defend his glove.

Let's not pretend that Reimer has even an average glove at this level of play. Forget comparing him to the elite. You compound that with his poor positioning at times, lack of recovery, inability to control rebounds. etc. etc. you have a fundamentally flawed goaltender.

Am I hopeful he can turn it around? Yes. But to argue otherwise is extremely difficult. Let's at least try to be objective guys.
Thanks for your objective opinions

hockeygeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 07:53 PM
  #148
Revolt
Registered User
 
Revolt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,920
vCash: 500
I think the five hole is a bigger problem

Revolt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-31-2013, 08:04 PM
  #149
rdawg1234
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,496
vCash: 500
I just think he's an all-around solid goaltender.

But that's not a good thing. I dont think he has the assets to take it to the next level and be the #1 we need.

He's the kind of goalie that keeps you in games but will never steal you games, and you need the goalies that steal you games.

its the difference between a jose theodore and a Lundvquist

rdawg1234 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-01-2013, 09:09 AM
  #150
zeke
#TeamReimer
 
zeke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 27,836
vCash: 500
It's funny hearing Bruins fans complaining about Rask's weakness "high glove" this year.

zeke is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:25 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.