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Old
02-13-2013, 05:54 PM
  #551
Yakushev72
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Originally Posted by Namejs View Post
Sorry, do you speak English? I love the fact that every single one of you is trying to have a go at the city of Riga or Dinamo Riga, when I have repeatedly said that Dinamo Riga is unsustainable as well.

Ladies, this is not about who lives in a bigger, wealthier city, it's about the economic management of KHL. If KHL wants to become a profitable enterprise with most of their teams being profitable or at least capable of breaking even without massive governmental assistance, the only rational step is to add already established teams from Europe from countries with a big hockey following.

The KHL has made several succesful decisions in this context, but if the KHL wants to move in the same direction and wants to become a financially self-sustainable league (in the long-term), it has to get rid of the smaller teams and teams, which are counter-productive in attaining that goal. Amur is one of them.

KHL has to transform from being a glorified Russian championship with some foreign teams thrown into the mix to actually becoming a "continental" league with as many European clubs as possible.

The market in Far East Russia is limited purely because of the small population size and economic capacity.
Let me try it one more time - Khabarovsk sells out every game, and has 4 times as many requests for season tickets as there available seats. So obviously, the population size and economic capacity are just right for a spectacularly successful franchise!


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02-13-2013, 06:04 PM
  #552
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Let me try it one more time before I write you off as a complete troll - Khabarovsk sells out every game, and has 4 times as many requests for season tickets as there available seats. So obviously, the population size and economic capacity are just right for a spectacularly successful franchise!
Except that, as far as I'm concerned, you've made the "has 4 times as many requests for season tickets as there available seats" part up. I've asked you to back up your claims at least 3(!) times now, you still haven't even tried to do that. Until you're able to do that, it doesn't mean anything.

If your claims are true, Khabarovsk is an absolute miracle in the entire hockey world. 30 000 season ticket holders with a population of 560k? Sounds a bit too good to be true.

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02-13-2013, 06:19 PM
  #553
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i don't understand what's the problem for Latvia that has 3 teams in MHL-B, one in MHL-A, and one in the KHL...
In addition all the MHL-B teams participate in the Latvian league as well. The weakness of Latvian league is not on KHL that's for sure.

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02-13-2013, 07:02 PM
  #554
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Originally Posted by Namejs View Post
Ladies, this is not about who lives in a bigger, wealthier city, it's about the economic management of KHL. If KHL wants to become a profitable enterprise with most of their teams being profitable or at least capable of breaking even without massive governmental assistance, the only rational step is to add already established teams from Europe from countries with a big hockey following.
Yes because it is that simple, KHL should hire this guy

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Originally Posted by Namejs View Post
The KHL has made several succesful decisions in this context, but if the KHL wants to move in the same direction and wants to become a financially self-sustainable league (in the long-term), it has to get rid of the smaller teams and teams, which are counter-productive in attaining that goal. Amur is one of them.
How is Amur counter-productive? Please can you explain this to me? In the past five years the Economy of Khabarovsk has doubled. The goal should be to establish teams in regions that have hockey interest, as the Russian economy continues to grow less and less assistance will be required as simple free market will take over, sponsorship from the government will continue for years if you want to maintain a good level of hockey and have decent players in the competition. This is not something that can be achieved in a couple of years but it is the only way, looking at the fundamentals and changes in the Russian economy it should continue to grow at a good rate for the next 20 years.

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KHL has to transform from being a glorified Russian championship with some foreign teams thrown into the mix to actually becoming a "continental" league with as many European clubs as possible.
Which is what they are working on, You do understand in the perfect world it would be simple to attain this but realistically it will take years, it is not like the KHL can simply go to a European Country which has a big Hockey following and bring them to the KHL. They face many barriers.

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The market in Far East Russia is limited purely because of the small population size and economic capacity.
Russian Far East is around 7 million people. So are you saying far east places, lets say Sakhalin where I was last week with a population of around half a million and and enormous economy while having a GDP Per Capita (PPP) higher than the likes of Canada, Germany etc (You are the one obsessing about GDP Per Capita - Figures from the IMF) shows that the Far East has limited economic capacity?

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02-13-2013, 07:55 PM
  #555
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i don't understand what's the problem for Latvia that has 3 teams in MHL-B, one in MHL-A, and one in the KHL...
In addition all the MHL-B teams participate in the Latvian league as well. The weakness of Latvian league is not on KHL that's for sure.


Right now there's no market for another single decent team in Latvia. Why?

First of all, Dinamo is attracting an overwhelming majority of the hockey fanbase in general. If you want to compete with DR, you have to steal a part of their fanbase.

Now because DR does not adhere to free market principles, the local players are receiving disproportional salaries relative to their skill level and so on, it is impossible to compete with Dinamo, unless some billionaire pops up, who's willing to waste millions in the same manner. But that is not going to happen.

As long as Dinamo exists, a decent Latvian league is a utopia.

That's not to mention another side-effect of the emergence of KHL - top tier Latvian players are no longer willing to compete for a place in the NHL as much as they did before, because the salary they're offered in the KHL is disproportionally high. From their viewpoint, it might become irrational to try to land a basic entry-level contract with an NHL side through the junior leagues/AHL, when they can just get signed by a KHL club. It impedes player development at the elite level.

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02-13-2013, 08:11 PM
  #556
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top tier Latvian players are no longer willing to compete for a place in the NHL as much as they did before,
I hope Slovaks, Czechs, Swedes, Finns, Russians etc will have the same attitude sooner than later.

What is bad at developing model KHL (Dinamo Riga) - latvian league and MHL A (HK Riga, Metallurgs or so) - MHL B (Riga Juniors) - latvian jr league?

You have the same model in USA: NHL-AHL- minors, NCAA-USHL-etc
Canada has the same system: NHL-minors, CHL (W,Q,O) - local jr leagues. Swedes has Elitserien-Allsvenskan-Division 1 etc, if they had KHL team, model would be KHL-Elitserien-Allsvenskan-Division 1

Whats the problem? Latvia is not the coutry, which national league can be elite league of Europe. Latvian league must be a developing league like slovak, czech, Elitserien, SM-Liiga.

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02-13-2013, 10:09 PM
  #557
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Originally Posted by Dynamo81 View Post
Yes because it is that simple, KHL should hire this guy
It is that simple.

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How is Amur counter-productive? Please can you explain this to me? In the past five years the Economy of Khabarovsk has doubled.
God almighty.

Amur travels some 140 000 kilometers every regular season (with that rate they could've went to the Moon and back since 2008).

If you would add up the total number of additional kilometers traveled by each team because of Amur, that figure would explode. It's a major strain on the finances of each team. My gut feeling says that if you'd add up the transportation costs, accomodation costs, the strain on the league's schedule, the negative effect on tv ratings (you can't watch the away game vs. Amur in Europe, because of the time difference) and the potential negative effect on the players' form (tiredness, insomnia, interrupted circadian rhythms due to the jet lag and a 9x2-hour-flight), the total losses would outweigh the gains, if there's a decent alternative available in Europe (European Russia, Norway or Poland, it doesn't matter).

I haven't really dug into that tbh, but chances are that detailed transportation costs haven't been published anywhere, so I'm afraid we can only speculate about this. Well, at least I haven't seen anything of that sort.

Quote:
The goal should be to establish teams in regions that have hockey interest, as the Russian economy continues to grow less and less assistance will be required as simple free market will take over, sponsorship from the government will continue for years if you want to maintain a good level of hockey and have decent players in the competition. This is not something that can be achieved in a couple of years but it is the only way, looking at the fundamentals and changes in the Russian economy it should continue to grow at a good rate for the next 20 years.
Looking at the fundamentals? OK. The Russian economy is still largely based on raw materials, which is a pretty volatile and risky thing, if you ask me. Especially considering the way shale gas is going to change the natural gas market in Europe and everyhwere else, but that's a different topic, I'm afraid.

Quote:
Which is what they are working on, You do understand in the perfect world it would be simple to attain this but realistically it will take years, it is not like the KHL can simply go to a European Country which has a big Hockey following and bring them to the KHL. They face many barriers.
Sure, but you have to understand that when facing a choice between westward expansion and maintaining a club in Russian Far East, the latter choice is irrational, which is my main point here. It's just common sense.

Quote:
Russian Far East is around 7 million people.
More like 6 and shrinking in an area the size of mainland Unites States.

Quote:
So are you saying far east places, lets say Sakhalin where I was last week with a population of around half a million and and enormous economy while having a GDP Per Capita (PPP) higher than the likes of Canada, Germany etc (You are the one obsessing about GDP Per Capita - Figures from the IMF) shows that the Far East has limited economic capacity?
Just because the place has oil and gas fields, doesn't mean it's not an isolated ****hole, which doesn't have a single urban area large enough to host an ice hockey team.

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02-13-2013, 10:19 PM
  #558
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Originally Posted by vorky View Post
I hope Slovaks, Czechs, Swedes, Finns, Russians etc will have the same attitude sooner than later.

What is bad at developing model KHL (Dinamo Riga) - latvian league and MHL A (HK Riga, Metallurgs or so) - MHL B (Riga Juniors) - latvian jr league?

You have the same model in USA: NHL-AHL- minors, NCAA-USHL-etc
Canada has the same system: NHL-minors, CHL (W,Q,O) - local jr leagues. Swedes has Elitserien-Allsvenskan-Division 1 etc, if they had KHL team, model would be KHL-Elitserien-Allsvenskan-Division 1

Whats the problem? Latvia is not the coutry, which national league can be elite league of Europe. Latvian league must be a developing league like slovak, czech, Elitserien, SM-Liiga.
In the context of Latvian hockey, my priority isn't to participate in an elite hockey league, the priority is to develop the Latvian hockey pyramid in a way that ensures the growth of hockey in Latvia in the long term and facilitates player growth from top to bottom. The KHL doesn't do that. I couldn't care less about Dinamo Riga, I care about the number and quality of Latvian hockey players.

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02-13-2013, 11:31 PM
  #559
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It is that simple.
How old are you?

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Amur travels some 140 000 kilometers every regular season (with that rate they could've went to the Moon and back since 2008).
So you are arguing about transportation costs affecting the profit of KHL teams? Can you provide a source for the numbers and how much it is hurting these teams, would love to take a look at the figures.

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Looking at the fundamentals? OK. The Russian economy is still largely based on raw materials, which is a pretty volatile and risky thing, if you ask me. Especially considering the way shale gas is going to change the natural gas market in Europe and everyhwere else, but that's a different topic, I'm afraid.
-This is my response to your off topic quote and I don't wish to indulge in this part of the discussion any further as it is off topic
Consumer oriented sectors already account for two-thirds of Russia's GDP and have contributed 80 percent of Russia's economic growth since 2004. Russia's consumer market will be the largest in Europe by 2020 and the fourth largest in the world, offering rich pickings for investors, they have been taking measures to continue the diversify the economy from Oil and Gas for the past ten years but the state is using its oil and gas windfall to subsidize the real economy, which has fueled a decade long shopping spree.

Large debate exists over Shale, I have no idea why you are so confident in it when many believe this may be a myth in fact more evidence shows that it is not the next best thing. Shale wells produce copious quantities of gas initially, which is then followed by a sharp drop off in production (Wells decline at rates of 40%!!). Shale gas is just another form of natural gas, and will not replace any other form of natural gas, except if it is cheaper, or closer to the market (Don't see any longevity in this). The current high rates of shale gas production growth cannot be sustained and will fall sharply in coming years. The future viability and production of these fields is dependent upon whether the hyperbolic model used by the gas and oil companies is true. In fact Germany has almost completley banned fracking of Shale Gas.

Russia has basically set up an Energy Cartel on Europe anyway and is making big strides into Asia (Finally).
-This is my response to your off topic quote and I don't wish to indulge in this part of the discussion any further as it is off topic we have both made our points


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Just because the place has oil and gas fields, doesn't mean it's not an isolated ****hole, which doesn't have a single urban area large enough to host an ice hockey team.
So you now are shifting goal posts after being caught out? Don't use those arguments if you don't enjoy them being applied against you.

By the way your hate for Russia in the few threads here is very cute I have been working in Moscow for seven years after spending my entire life being educated and working in the West. I always find Russophobes hilarious. Don't worry Russians are nice people


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02-14-2013, 03:03 AM
  #560
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As long as Dinamo exists, a decent Latvian league is a utopia.
Do you think Karsums, Indrasis, Darzins, Sprukts, Redlihs, Bartulis and Galvins would play in the Latvian league if it was formed next season? Of course not.

Dinamo Riga is not a direct competitor for the possible Latvian domestic league, because the top Latvian players would not play in the domestic league. They would play in the KHL and other top Euro leagues. More players would also play in the AHL, ECHL etc.

Currently the only chance of Latvian hockey fans to see quality hockey is Dinamo Riga.

Personally I don't care whether Dinamo stays in the KHL or not. I don't like that Russian money is being spent to finance non-Russian hockey clubs. But if I think this from Latvia's perspective I would keep Dinamo Riga in the KHL and try to form that domestic league at the same time. Keep those two as separate entities. Or maybe Dinamo could have it's farm club in the domestic league if it's level is high enough.

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02-14-2013, 03:11 AM
  #561
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Especially considering the way shale gas is going to change the natural gas market in Europe and everyhwere else.
Shale gas is going to be a boon rather than a boom. It is expensive to drill and pollutes the environment. The ongoing shale gas "boom" in the US will not last long. Europe is never going to be self-sufficient on gas. I remember about two years ago there was talk that Poland could become the next "gas superpower" in Europe with its supposedly large shale gas reserves. But after more exploration those dreams were buried and Poland was forced to sign another long term contract with Russia's Gazprom for gas deliveries.

The potentially biggest shale oil and gas reserves in Europe are, ironically, in Russia. Google "Bazhenov formation" for more info.

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02-14-2013, 03:16 AM
  #562
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Do you think Karsums, Indrasis, Darzins, Sprukts, Redlihs, Bartulis and Galvins would play in the Latvian league if it was formed next season? Of course not.

Dinamo Riga is not a direct competitor for the possible Latvian domestic league, because the top Latvian players would not play in the domestic league. They would play in the KHL and other top Euro leagues. More players would also play in the AHL, ECHL etc.

Currently the only chance of Latvian hockey fans to see quality hockey is Dinamo Riga.

Personally I don't care whether Dinamo stays in the KHL or not. I don't like that Russian money is being spent to finance non-Russian hockey clubs. But if I think this from Latvia's perspective I would keep Dinamo Riga in the KHL and try to form that domestic league at the same time. Keep those two as separate entities. Or maybe Dinamo could have it's farm club in the domestic league if it's level is high enough.
I'm sorry to quote my own post, but I was thinking that Kazakhstan has a similar situation that I described there.

Kazakhstan has Barys Astana in the KHL. They also have two teams (Ust-Kamenogorsk and Karaganda) in the VHL. And they have their own domestic league where Barys' farm team plays for.

Maybe this is a model that Latvia could also aim for? Of course Kazakhstan has oil money and Latvia does not.

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02-14-2013, 04:01 AM
  #563
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The market in Far East Russia is limited purely because of the small population size and economic capacity.
Russian Far East has more people than Finland and almost as much as Sweden. If the economy there continues to grow at a current pace it should be able to host two KHL teams, preferably in Khabarovsk and Vladivostok.

I think Vladivostok recently got a new arena. Is that up to KHL standards?

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02-14-2013, 07:55 AM
  #564
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Dont know if this is righ thread...

Next edition of European Trophy has Slovan Bratislava as competitor again. Final tournament will consist of russian club as well.

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02-14-2013, 10:16 AM
  #565
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Right now there's no market for another single decent team in Latvia. Why?

First of all, Dinamo is attracting an overwhelming majority of the hockey fanbase in general. If you want to compete with DR, you have to steal a part of their fanbase.

Now because DR does not adhere to free market principles, the local players are receiving disproportional salaries relative to their skill level and so on, it is impossible to compete with Dinamo, unless some billionaire pops up, who's willing to waste millions in the same manner. But that is not going to happen.

As long as Dinamo exists, a decent Latvian league is a utopia.

That's not to mention another side-effect of the emergence of KHL - top tier Latvian players are no longer willing to compete for a place in the NHL as much as they did before, because the salary they're offered in the KHL is disproportionally high. From their viewpoint, it might become irrational to try to land a basic entry-level contract with an NHL side through the junior leagues/AHL, when they can just get signed by a KHL club. It impedes player development at the elite level.
I'm curious about your constant reference to a "decent Latvian league." What kind of league would you envision? To have something that could be called a league, you would probably have to have at least six teams. So that means that, with a national population of about 1.3 million people, the local talent pool from which six teams would be staffed would be about 200,000 people per team. That's obviously a very small talent pool from which to draw. What kind of salaries do you envision these teams paying? How many of the best Latvian players would go somewhere other than Latvia to play? If most or all of the best talent goes elsewhere, how much would local fans be willing to pay to watch the leftovers play? I am just curious about your vision.

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02-14-2013, 11:01 AM
  #566
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Originally Posted by Yakushev72 View Post
I'm curious about your constant reference to a "decent Latvian league." What kind of league would you envision? To have something that could be called a league, you would probably have to have at least six teams. So that means that, with a national population of about 1.3 million people, the local talent pool from which six teams would be staffed would be about 200,000 people per team. That's obviously a very small talent pool from which to draw. What kind of salaries do you envision these teams paying? How many of the best Latvian players would go somewhere other than Latvia to play? If most or all of the best talent goes elsewhere, how much would local fans be willing to pay to watch the leftovers play? I am just curious about your vision.
^That surely is Estonia's population, no? Anyway our top football teams budgets are $2 dollars, they are similar probably in basketball so you figure what our regional hockey teams could pull together.

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02-14-2013, 11:03 AM
  #567
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^That surely is Estonia's population, no? Anyway our top football teams budgets are $2 dollars, they are similar probably in basketball so you figure what our regional hockey teams could pull together.

Wait a sec,got to go buy me a football club

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02-14-2013, 11:06 AM
  #568
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Wait a sec,got to go buy me a football club
2 Million dollars obviously.

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02-14-2013, 11:08 AM
  #569
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2 Million dollars obviously.
Thats why the- was there

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02-14-2013, 12:26 PM
  #570
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^That surely is Estonia's population, no? Anyway our top football teams budgets are $2 dollars, they are similar probably in basketball so you figure what our regional hockey teams could pull together.
Sorry. According to Wikipedia, the population of Latvia is actually 2.2 million. That doesn't dramatically refute my point that it is a very small talent base from which to build a major league. Still, if Latvians will support it financially, who am I to say?

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02-14-2013, 12:41 PM
  #571
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I'm curious about your constant reference to a "decent Latvian league." What kind of league would you envision? To have something that could be called a league, you would probably have to have at least six teams. So that means that, with a national population of about 1.3 million people, the local talent pool from which six teams would be staffed would be about 200,000 people per team. That's obviously a very small talent pool from which to draw. What kind of salaries do you envision these teams paying? How many of the best Latvian players would go somewhere other than Latvia to play? If most or all of the best talent goes elsewhere, how much would local fans be willing to pay to watch the leftovers play? I am just curious about your vision.
Well, don't know about that guy but I see it the following way:
The total value of both Latvian football and basketball leagues is around 10 million USD, give or take. Therefore this ''decent'' Latvian hockey league would also consist of about 10 million USD that have to be invested in hockey (say 2 teams each season budget around 2 million USD, others aroud 1 million). Hockey is an expensive sport but I don't believe Liepājas Metalurgs at the moment is operating with bigger numbers than a million bucks in BOL. At the good times R2000 operated with 4 million USD (but then there was also no Latvian league), during the Latvian league time I doubt all 4 professional clubs spent more than 1.5 million USD per season... So such budgets could be plausible.

Of course it's nothing for countries like Norway or Denmark (I mean salary-wise) but in Latvia, if we make the league something like a student U25 league, it could be quite good and competitive and attractive for young hockey players. I do not think we should strive to compete with VHL, Slovakia or even BOL, even if the latter two's level is also gradually declining, but it would be a good league for guys who still can't make KHL or VHL or Slovak league teams but might take more time to mature. By the age of 25 they graduate university and at that time it might be clear if there will be a player or not. Latvia is a small country, travel distances are minimal. Some cooperation could be made with universities, hotels etc. to cut losses. There could even be like 3 veteran players (local Ozo's) but I wouldn't want to see the same case that we see in BOL or some other, as our NA friends would say, semi-pro leagues where there are these ''muzhiki-razboiniki" (or goons, as in the movie) who at 30+ do not contribute anything to hockey game, just sit in the 3rd or 4th line and beat up young prospects using kick-boxing techniques during the game... Like in the video below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tULBvuvfQ-w
It's one of the best seasons of the pre-Dinamo Latvian league and here a nobody from 3rd or 4th line is savagely beating up a young prospect. Terjohin (the kick-boxing technique wizard) is now playing in Neherlands league, Guntis Galvins whom he is beating is one of Dinamo Riga's defensive leaders...

Some people care very much about the fate of those 3rd/4th line Latvian league level grinders and say they should have an opportunity to earn money in hockey in Latvia, but as I see it- U25 league... If you are very good at U25 but still cannot get a good contract abroad, they you can stay. If you cannot produce then there's always Netherlands, French 3rd league etc. for you if you want to pursue hockey ''career'', and new batch of talents should come in the league.

Therefore I see it as a feeder to VHL, Slovak league, maybe Allsvenkan and such...

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02-14-2013, 03:57 PM
  #572
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so, I don't get, does anyone here think that the players currently playing for Dinamo Riga would stay in a so-called Latvian league? like before, when they played all over Europe or the players who are not good enough for DR now playing in every possible European dweller leagues?

KHL has a tone of issues, but it surely is easy to blaim someone for giving your country a chance to see a lot of decent teams and players.

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02-14-2013, 04:37 PM
  #573
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Somewhat ironic that a few Russian posters now understand and implement (correctly) the argument that the market dictates where players go. A strong Latvian league is utopia ; it will not happen. Your best players at a relatively early age will always go to either your top development team or abroad. This is how a capitalist sport system works.

Namesj, your point in this is somewhat convuluted here. If you want to say that the current KHL economic structure is not indefinitely feasible ; i agree. The Russian economy/Government backing will not last forever, thus the KHL basically has to organise itself as structurally sound before this bust/draining of funds happen.

However, you are trying to make the point that franchises like Amur are not feasibe, which is nonsense. Within this current structure ; they are feasible. Citing population of an area is irrelevant. It's like citing Germany and saying they will be a hockey power. Population is irrelevant. Hockey culture isn't. Sweden, a country of a few million, has many excellent sporting clubs that produce great players in an environment where hockey is loved. Why cannot the same work for Franchises like Amur?

No sporting league in the world can have 20 or 30 economic juggernauts. Capitalism does not work that way. If the culture is there and the fans are there ; it is feasible.

Or do you want to tell me the Premier league should contract half their teams, because they require rich owners, make no money etc? No. You won't.

I think this discussion would proceed in a better fashion if you stopped convuluting your points. Your mixing ideas that contradict each other.

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02-14-2013, 05:34 PM
  #574
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Quote:
The Russian economy/Government backing will not last forever, thus the KHL basically has to organise itself as structurally sound before this bust/draining of funds happen.
tell us what should KHL do? Yes, local government or russian companies support clubs and will do that. But what to do?

1.to pay less money to players? RESULT: exodus of top players, no foreigners. No chance to keep Kuznetsov, Tarasenko until their 22

2. to share revenue from broadcasting rights? Will happen soon, dont worry.

Btw, how do you want to earn/increase money from tv deals if you dont have top players? Is anybody outside Sweden interested in Elitserien? Not.

3.Clubs/regions have been investing into arenas, building new one. Huge lost of money. You know, good tv product needs modern arenas, so you have to invest.

4.Imagine there is not KHL TV. How do you want to sell the product? KHL have spent a lot of money to develop KHL TV. Waste of money?

Tell us, what should KHL do? I have no idea. As I know KHL has been in phase 1 - investing and developing the product. Therefore losing money. Nobody knows what will be after 20 years, but we know for sure this (as example): Torpedo will have new arena for 15 000, there is a chance to triple revenues from ticketing (now they have arena for 5 600). Do you think that this extra money will not help Torpedo?

And now imagine better international calendar (WHC in february, no EHT). That means cca 70 games in regular season instead of 52 (btw, KHL had 56 games in RS in past, why not now?). So more home games, more money.

If I remember Slovan´s average ticket (after auction saga) was around 20 euro. Tickets for QF (pack of 2 or 3 home games) is € 49 and more (dont count fanclub - € 30). It is only for holders of season tickets, the rest must buy singel ticket at auction.

now math..lets say single ticket in RS costs 20 euro, in play-off 30 euro.

20x26 (home games in regular season)x10 055 (sold out)=5 228 600
30x2 (home games in play-off)x10 055 (sold out)=603 300

Right? Correct me if wrong. So it is almost 6 mil euro from ticketing for Slovan this season (+/-). Budget was declared at 10 mil. euro. If Slovan makes 2nd round of PO, ticketing will be 6,5-7 mil euro. Not so bad. Plus prize money for making 2nd round. Imagine money from KHL for tv rights (1 mil euro?? more? less?). Merchendising (no idea)?

I hope my math is right, it is too late here.

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02-14-2013, 06:59 PM
  #575
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Jan Filc, ex-coach of slovak NT and vicepresident slovak hockey federation, said for slovak media that there was effort in Sparta Prague to join KHL in past. Now, Sparta and Lev have the same owner.

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