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Old
07-08-2006, 01:18 PM
  #1
Blindsided
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What would you...?

Im a new ice hockey player, and i need to get a new stick. The one i use now is wooden and i want a composite one for the up-coming season. I wanted to now what kind of stick you guys would recomend. Is their any brand thats better than another? And also, how big of a curve should there be on it?


Last edited by nic29+: 07-08-2006 at 04:23 PM. Reason: Fixed title spelling error
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07-08-2006, 01:46 PM
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sc37
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Personal preference. But for you, I'd say try some two piece sticks...try the standard and tapered to see what you like better. And then find what curve you like, and gives you a chance to better experiment, the two piece does. And they give you almost identical performance as a OPS.

But if you really want a OPS, go for a Montreal Nitro. That was my first OPS, and I just love the stick. I'm currently using a Nitro with a Lidtrom clone curve. You can find them on closeout pretty easliy.

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07-08-2006, 08:44 PM
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bladoww
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nittyfreak31 View Post
Im a new ice hockey player, and i need to get a new stick. The one i use now is wooden and i want a composite one for the up-coming season. I wanted to now what kind of stick you guys would recomend. Is their any brand thats better than another? And also, how big of a curve should there be on it?
Well first off, with the stick/shaft you may want to give the Louisville TPS Tricore a shot. The inside is kevlar and graphite but its wrapped in a real thin wood (hence the name tricore). I like it a lot, and that may make the transition easy. Also, grab a radius cornered stick/shaft if possible, you may like that too.

What kind of shot do you have? For me I have trouble getting my slapshots up high enough so I go with either a Lidstrom or Lecavalier curve (I think the Pronger RBK is similar too). If you have no probs getting your shots up you may want to stay away from the real open-faced curves. You may want to buy a few cheapo blades to determine which curve you like - or maybe borrow a buddies stick.

In any event, you might really want to consider using a shaft as opposed to a one-peice and the like. With a shaft you can experiment with different patterns until you find one that works for you. As far as brands go, well I guess thats just a matter of opinion. I like my TPS, but I mainly use Branches (which are damn near impossible to find now). You almost can't go wrong with some sort of Easton though. Like SC said though Montreal makes a pretty mean one too.

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07-08-2006, 08:56 PM
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RangerSteve
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I have a question for ya. Which type of wooden stick do you have now? If you like the curve of that stick, check to see if you know which player has their named slapped on it. Obviously if you get either a standard or tapered shaft, you'll more than likely be able to use the same curve on a replacement blade or two. Of course this is only if you are content with the blade you are currently using.

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07-08-2006, 08:56 PM
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Heat McManus
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I play with Easton comp shafts and wooden blades. I use a Z-Bubble, it's a bit on the pricier side, but the lower models are good as well. THe combo of comp shaft/wooden blade offers light weight without sacrificing the feel of the puck.

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07-08-2006, 10:21 PM
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xeric716x
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Personal preference. but if you go with the OPS get a Bauer XXX ultra lite.

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07-09-2006, 12:46 AM
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Biggsy
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The One Piece sticks the blades on them might be to bouncy for a beginner who doesnt know how to recieve a pass to well so maybe start off with a shaft and a wood blade then slowly work your way up i guess

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07-09-2006, 10:09 AM
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Blindsided
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RangerSteve View Post
I have a question for ya. Which type of wooden stick do you have now? If you like the curve of that stick, check to see if you know which player has their named slapped on it. Obviously if you get either a standard or tapered shaft, you'll more than likely be able to use the same curve on a replacement blade or two. Of course this is only if you are content with the blade you are currently using.
The wooden stick that i use is Bauer and it has Lindros on it. But the blade absolutely sucks. i cant stand it! It wont shoot up high and i have troubles trying to do a slap shot.
When i was checking out sticks yesturday, i found one that i really liked. It was Easton and it had a nice curve in the blade but its not a two-piece. I probably would have bought it but i didnt have the money. But Im gonna look at some other sticks before i get an new one.

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07-09-2006, 10:30 AM
  #9
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Easton sticks are the best way to go. I still use my Synergy and is a great 1 piece.

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07-09-2006, 02:09 PM
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sc37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggsy View Post
The One Piece sticks the blades on them might be to bouncy for a beginner who doesnt know how to recieve a pass to well so maybe start off with a shaft and a wood blade then slowly work your way up i guess
A lotta people say that, cept I switched to my Montreal Nitro OPS (I succumbed to the fad) and I had a ton more success than using my Sherwood, and my Easton shaft with Nike blade.

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07-09-2006, 02:11 PM
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I'd go with a shaft/blade combo over a OPS at his point. For someone like yourself. The difference between a decent shaft/blade combo and a OPS would be minimal.

You could go with something like this.

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/ccm-sfvectorv6-0sr.html

and...

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/ccm-rbv5sr.html

You're under $100 and still have a nice feeling durable stick. Easton makes anice shaft and some are pretty cheap $$$. You should give them a look. If you are buying it from a shop, ask for help. People there should be able to help you buy a stick that fits your needs and won't kill your bank account. Remember, anytime you try something new go cheap. That way if you don't like it you aren't into for all that much.

I like deep curves because I handle the puck a lot. The Thornton curve is really good for handling the puck and wrist shots. You can still get a decent slapper with too. If you want more hieght to your shots get a blade with an open face.

If you want a OPS, check out the RBK 4k or the Warrior Royal. The Warrior being the more durable of the two. CCM makes a very durable OPS and hockeymonkey.com has some on closeout.

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07-09-2006, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sc37 View Post
A lotta people say that, cept I switched to my Montreal Nitro OPS (I succumbed to the fad) and I had a ton more success than using my Sherwood, and my Easton shaft with Nike blade.
Same here. I think OPS's are better at absorbing the shock then a combo. My Z-Bubble was pretty bad in that area.

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07-10-2006, 10:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfloorpunch716x View Post
Personal preference. but if you go with the OPS get a Bauer XXX ultra lite.
lol, is that some sort of Easton/Bauer hybrid?

If you're starting out I'd get something like an Easton Ultra lite and get a wood or hybrid blade.

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07-10-2006, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfloorpunch716x View Post
Personal preference. but if you go with the OPS get a Bauer XXX ultra lite.
I think the word "don't" is missing in this comment.

The Vapor XXX is a great stick, but it's not known for it's durability. In fact it's just the opposite.

Spending $160.00 on your first OPS only to have it break in a few months is not a wise choice. My first OPS was a Louisville TPS Rubber Response I got it for $42.50. I wasn't horribly disappointed when it cracked (use it as a back up now). It was a nice and inexpensive introduction to the OPS market. If I didn't like it I wasn't out all that much $$$.

Make sure you like the feel of a OPS and find a blade pattern you like before buying a high end expensive stick like a Vapor XXX ultra lite.

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07-10-2006, 11:16 AM
  #15
sc37
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There's good feedback on the TPS sticks, and you can get the yellow one (which I think is the Rubber Response) cheap, cause there are new models coming out.

But yeah, XXX Lite isn't known for durability, but really depends on how tough you are on your stick. I've been using my stick for quite a while and haven't even had a crack in the blade yet, 'knock on wood'

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07-10-2006, 01:04 PM
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I play in goal much more than skate out these days, but Bauer OP's have never let me down yet...

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07-10-2006, 09:55 PM
  #17
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Personally I hate composites, they are hard to get used to after using a wooden stick for a long time. Wood feels more natural, and composites feel more "ceramic" like.. I've used shaft/wood blade combos, and those are pretty good for me.

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07-13-2006, 06:34 AM
  #18
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by far your best deal is on the Bauer XXX, you can find them for $90-$110 at the lowest. They are a great performing stick and the durability is pretty nice. The Bauer XXX lite is crappy on durability and the feel is not very good IMO. BUT since you are new and might want to experiment with different curves I recommend a standard shaft... this once again brings me to the Easton Ultra lite or the z-bubble. Possibly a TPS red lite, which would give you great durability and good feel. Also the mission L-2 is a pretty good shaft and you can find a shaft + 2 blades combo from most of the bigger name online hockey stores for about $130,

All in all I don't recommend a one-piece unless you know you're going to like the curve, a (standard, non-tapered)shaft would offer you almost unlimited options in blade patterns. The best part about a shaft + blade setup is that a very large percent of sticks are broken in the blade. With a one-piece that means either trashing it, cutting it to make it a shaft or selling it to someone to make it into a shaft; with a shaft + blade setup all you do is heat up the blade and pull it out and replace.

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07-13-2006, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nittyfreak31 View Post
The wooden stick that i use is Bauer and it has Lindros on it. But the blade absolutely sucks. i cant stand it! It wont shoot up high and i have troubles trying to do a slap shot.
When i was checking out sticks yesturday, i found one that i really liked. It was Easton and it had a nice curve in the blade but its not a two-piece. I probably would have bought it but i didnt have the money. But Im gonna look at some other sticks before i get an new one.
Get another wooden stick instead of OPS. Or just stay with one you have. Try lighter stick like Sher-Wood 5030 or TPS Lite. Spending money is not a good substitute for work. No new stick will make you better as much as practice would. Work on your shots, but what is by far more important is your stickhandling and passing. As a beginer you will find out soon that 1 or 2 shots per game is the most you can get. Use the stick with lesser curve, so your backhand passing/shooting would not be a problem. Keep in mind that the balance of the stick is as important as anything else. You should be able to manipulate it comfortably using one hand for pock checking and swipping.

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07-13-2006, 05:11 PM
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My personal preference for two piece sticks is TPS. I don't know what it is about them, but I love TPS sticks. I have used a TPS Rubber for the last couple of years. It is probably the most durable stick you can find. The stick I bought before my newer rubber, lasted like 2 or 3 seasons, until it was way too short to use, and it got to the point where I had a large extension and it took away from the power of my shot.

My personal preference for blades is definately Easton Lidstrom. Before my Lidstrom curve, I believe I had a Jagr and it was pretty flat with a real weird shaped curve, might not be a Jagr. But I went from the Jagr to something like Yzerman and had troubles controling the height of my slapshot. With the Lidstrom curve I could keep it low easily or ring one off the crossbar if I wanted.

I believe TPS no longer makes the Rubber. But I have seen a few kicking around at United Cycle, but that was like a couple months ago. I really don't know what I am going to do when I either outgrow this stick or it snaps. Maybe a TPS Response Rubber.

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07-13-2006, 05:41 PM
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TBLfan
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you can find tps rubber sticks on hockeymonkey/hockeygiant and the like. The only issue with them is that they tend to beat up on the palms of your gloves.

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07-13-2006, 10:56 PM
  #22
bladoww
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
you can find tps rubber sticks on hockeymonkey/hockeygiant and the like. The only issue with them is that they tend to beat up on the palms of your gloves.
Doesn't happen with every glove. I've used a TPS rubber stick for over a year now and my TPS bionics are just fine..

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07-14-2006, 07:32 AM
  #23
TBLfan
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also depends on how much you play and how hard you are on the gloves. But they are practically unbreakable sticks.

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07-14-2006, 07:40 AM
  #24
stick9
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Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
also depends on how much you play and how hard you are on the gloves. But they are practically unbreakable sticks.
I never noticed any wear to the palms of my gloves, just some discoloration.

The stick took a ton of abuse. It took to heavy shots to the heal and a dent/crack appeared. I can still use it though.

Nice sticks. It felt a lot nicer then my Z-Bubble with a comp blabe. I would have bought more if the shop I go to still had them.

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07-14-2006, 07:48 AM
  #25
PensFanInCBus
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I use an Easton Ultra Lite shaft and a wood Nike Quest 2 blade with a Lemieux Curve. I've been having a hard time finding that curve, it may have been discontinued, or maybe my hockey shop stopped carrying them.

I've used this for the last 10 months or so and I'm loving it.

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