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Am I ridiculous?

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Old
08-02-2006, 04:19 PM
  #26
Hugh Madbrough
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I have been going to a Stick and Puck session after the skate class. That makes a big difference. I just do drills on my own.

I'm pretty much back in shape and playing well now, only took about 3 months.

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08-03-2006, 01:05 AM
  #27
Magnus Fulgur
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Many simple excercises help with developing leg and lower back strength: the power skating is a part of that.

I've seen many people improve their skating dramatically just from doing lunges and squats with dumbells. It worked for me a little bit too.

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08-03-2006, 01:45 AM
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JM47 View Post
I have been going to a Stick and Puck session after the skate class. That makes a big difference. I just do drills on my own.

I'm pretty much back in shape and playing well now, only took about 3 months.
Honestly, it feels like you're not working on much, but the drills I do with my college team are the same ones I see little kids doing...you can always, ALWAYS work on stopping, edge control, crossovers, building speed, etc. You're always going to have a weak side.

It's kind of funny actually, I had been away from hockey and skating for a number of years before I started playing club hockey at school. I felt more comfortable that first time back after god knows how long than when I get on the ice and haven't skated for 3 days now...i think i've lost everything and my game will go to hell...well truth be told my game never really left hell in the first place but w/e lol...

I teach guitar, and there are guys who are really, really terrified of calling me up and asking for lessons. Honestly, I don't understand why our culture thinks that if you haven't started doing something by age 16, you can never pick it up. There is absolutley no shame in asking for help from someone who's been there! Good luck man.

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08-06-2006, 03:23 AM
  #29
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At least you have that past experience. I skated a bit in a figure school for 5 years at 14 (where I didn't learn any hockey skills) and started skating again at 23. Half the time I wonder am I too old. Doesn't help when you reach the ice once a week.

My puckhandling-whilst-on-skates is terrible. Seem to always miss the puck when passed to me at the moment.

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08-06-2006, 01:05 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
At least you have that past experience. I skated a bit in a figure school for 5 years at 14 (where I didn't learn any hockey skills) and started skating again at 23. Half the time I wonder am I too old. Doesn't help when you reach the ice once a week.
I didn't learn to stop on skates until I was 33. You're not too old.
IMO the only thing you need to do is not worry about (maybe) being the worst player on the ice, and practice as much as you can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
My puckhandling-whilst-on-skates is terrible. Seem to always miss the puck when passed to me at the moment.
You may find it easier (if you're not doing this already) to stick handle with just your top hand on the stick. I find I need the greater range of motion that way -- when I use 2 hands the puck gets out of my range and I skate past it. As far as accepting a pass, it might be as simple as keeping two hands on your stick, your stick on the ice and your eye on the puck until it reaches your stick. Are there particular passes you have trouble with or all of them?

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08-06-2006, 10:29 PM
  #31
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I tend to skate over/past the puck once I receive it. Don't think I'm reaching out for it. Other times I dont think my blade is level witht he ice cos my stick is there but somehow the puck bypasses it. Argh - rather embarrassing.

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08-06-2006, 10:31 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
I tend to skate over/past the puck once I receive it. Don't think I'm reaching out for it. Other times I dont think my blade is level witht he ice cos my stick is there but somehow the puck bypasses it. Argh - rather embarrassing.
Get a longer stick.

You won't stick handle as well, but you'll miss the puck less.

And, take heart. Not all of us can be good hockey players. Personally, I think the average 10 year old could school me if not for the size factor. Even then....

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08-06-2006, 10:34 PM
  #33
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been wondering whether I can blame this on my stick...i mean i receive the puck but have trouble getting it from close range to outer handling range whilst skating. and half the time is im having trouble manipulating the tip of the blade. I probably just need more practice

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08-06-2006, 11:45 PM
  #34
Magnus Fulgur
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Don't change the stick length: change where you grip it!

Try stickhandling and receiving passes with your hands closer together and closer to your body. This will make your touch softer. Think of lacrosse. Cradle the puck.

Only drop your lower hand for shooting!

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08-07-2006, 12:06 AM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxostoma Rufum View Post
Don't change the stick length: change where you grip it!

Try stickhandling and receiving passes with your hands closer together and closer to your body. This will make your touch softer. Think of lacrosse. Cradle the puck.

Only drop your lower hand for shooting!
Heh, i forgot about the "Your body can bend' thing. Yes, anyone can recieve the puck with a shorter stick. But for novices, it is harder

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08-07-2006, 12:48 AM
  #36
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There are 30 year old NHLers who take skating lessons of one form or another...so you've got nothing to be embarassed about.
I consider myself a "good skater"...but I develpoed bad/lazy habits and when your just playing rec. hockey etc. its EZ to forget the skating side of hockey and let other aspects make up for the lack of leg-work being done.
The past couple of weks I have ben skating with Major Jr. players who are doing 2-a-days to get ready for their respective fall camps and I have been FORCED to re-introduce myself to some fundamentals of skating.

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08-07-2006, 02:40 PM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
been wondering whether I can blame this on my stick...i mean i receive the puck but have trouble getting it from close range to outer handling range whilst skating. and half the time is im having trouble manipulating the tip of the blade. I probably just need more practice
Keep as much of the blade on the ice -- you won't stop much with just the tip. If you can't manipulate the stick into a good receiving position then move your body to get your stick in place. Pivot, skate backwards, whatever it takes. Remember that you can also stop a puck with your skates and kick it forward onto your stick.

For practice I have a plastic ball -- it's as heavy as a hockey puck and you can buy it at most hockey stores. I make hard passes against a wall and practice handling the rebound. I still make mistakes during games but it's helped quite a bit.


Last edited by EmptyNetter: 08-07-2006 at 02:47 PM.
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08-07-2006, 02:46 PM
  #38
Hugh Madbrough
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
I tend to skate over/past the puck once I receive it. Don't think I'm reaching out for it. Other times I dont think my blade is level witht he ice cos my stick is there but somehow the puck bypasses it. Argh - rather embarrassing.
Could be the lie on the stick as well.

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08-08-2006, 03:33 AM
  #39
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thanks for the tips I'll try them out. and maybe look at new sticks sometime.

Am thinking of getting rollerblades to practise in, thing is, last time i was in rollerblades i didnt like them that much because it was so much more bumpier than ice skates.

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08-08-2006, 09:17 AM
  #40
Hugh Madbrough
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this could be just my personal experience but when I was playing both inline and ice hockey my ice skating suffered. I stopped playing inline and my ice skating improved a lot.

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08-09-2006, 01:00 AM
  #41
Phoenix
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oh bugger, do the rest of ya's find that as well?

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08-09-2006, 03:28 AM
  #42
trueblueinboston
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Nah, as long as you make sure you rollerblade like you ice skate...obviously, stopping is going to be different/nonexistent on rollerblades, but crossovers and all that stuff are the same.

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08-09-2006, 09:12 AM
  #43
Hugh Madbrough
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Quote:
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Nah, as long as you make sure you rollerblade like you ice skate...obviously, stopping is going to be different/nonexistent on rollerblades, but crossovers and all that stuff are the same.
That's true and I should have been more specific. Stopping on inlines screwed me up, I still have a bad habit of stopping on one leg as a result.

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