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Old
08-01-2006, 04:10 PM
  #1
EmersonBeatemEtem
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new player here

I have recently been thinking about signing up for an adult hockey league here where i live. I've tried to get some info on it, but I have a few questions i would like to ask some more experienced players here.

There are several levels in which you can sign up for. The one for me obviously would be the beginner level. The only real experience I have playing would be some street hockey and that was over ten years ago. In fact, I just got back on the ice a few days ago for the first time in over ten years. I was still able to do it, but I can tell i need to work on skating some before I start playing.

The questions I have however are, from what I have told you about my experience level, do you think the beginner level would be for me? meaning that would the other people involved be at the same level i am, or would they be lower or possibly higher?

Another question I have is regarding equipment. What would you all reccomend in terms of sticks, skates, padding, etc...

thank you

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08-01-2006, 04:45 PM
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Grave77digger
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Beginner would be fine, and there will be alot of people playng better than you. For padding dont be cheap, get everything you can to include a cup/facemask. Unless you want to get your 2 front teeth knocked out like me last week

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08-01-2006, 05:52 PM
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Really depends...but the 'D' or low level league I play in is pretty competitive and there are good players, some of which might be considered ringers IMO. But you'll also find people in the same boat as you. But it's the lowest league I can go, but you'll pick things up fast when playing against good competition. If you are really worried, take some classes. I think most importantly, you should learn positioning, and skating. With those basics, you can hold your own while your shot and stick work come along.

For gear, find what fits you the best. Don't worry about cost...I started out with cheap stuff and found I wanted to upgrade really soon. And if you find the fit good on one product, think about the protection and maybe considering moving up a notch (maybe you like the fit of the Bauer 400 elbow pads, but would getting the 4000 be more beneficial if you fall a lot?) Beginners sometimes have their own issues...I busted my butt one too many times and found a need for better pants especially. But you can skimp on maybe shoulder pads since the league is most likely no-checking. You can probably start out with wooden sticks too since they are cheaper...but you might find out you like the one-piece composites too. But maybe ask around and see if you can borrow one before buying. I found I liked the composite stick feel better and found a good deal...but if wood works for you, you can save some bucks there too. I think the most important thing is skates. Make sure the ones you get are perfect for you...if the skate doesn't fit, you'll hate skating and practicing, plus your feet will kill. And again, don't skimp cause you might find you'll wanna upgrade sooner. And the durability seems to be better with the nicer skates, they stay stiff longer, offer more proteciton, and have nicer holders, etc. Go to your local hockey store and look around and ask for help too. I also found out that buying online as a first timer isn't a good idea. Buying online once you find what works well for you is fine..but as a noob, don't do it unless you are absolutely sure it's what you want. That being said, don't use your hockey store as a fitting room either. Hope that answers your questions...once you start playing, you can't stop, hockey is really addicting, hope you have fun. Lemme know, or PM me if you got questions that can make things smoother!

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08-01-2006, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by sc37 View Post
Really depends...but the 'D' or low level league I play in is pretty competitive and there are good players, some of which might be considered ringers IMO. But you'll also find people in the same boat as you. But it's the lowest league I can go, but you'll pick things up fast when playing against good competition. If you are really worried, take some classes. I think most importantly, you should learn positioning, and skating. With those basics, you can hold your own while your shot and stick work come along.

For gear, find what fits you the best. Don't worry about cost...I started out with cheap stuff and found I wanted to upgrade really soon. And if you find the fit good on one product, think about the protection and maybe considering moving up a notch (maybe you like the fit of the Bauer 400 elbow pads, but would getting the 4000 be more beneficial if you fall a lot?) Beginners sometimes have their own issues...I busted my butt one too many times and found a need for better pants especially. But you can skimp on maybe shoulder pads since the league is most likely no-checking. You can probably start out with wooden sticks too since they are cheaper...but you might find out you like the one-piece composites too. But maybe ask around and see if you can borrow one before buying. I found I liked the composite stick feel better and found a good deal...but if wood works for you, you can save some bucks there too. I think the most important thing is skates. Make sure the ones you get are perfect for you...if the skate doesn't fit, you'll hate skating and practicing, plus your feet will kill. And again, don't skimp cause you might find you'll wanna upgrade sooner. And the durability seems to be better with the nicer skates, they stay stiff longer, offer more proteciton, and have nicer holders, etc. Go to your local hockey store and look around and ask for help too. I also found out that buying online as a first timer isn't a good idea. Buying online once you find what works well for you is fine..but as a noob, don't do it unless you are absolutely sure it's what you want. That being said, don't use your hockey store as a fitting room either. Hope that answers your questions...once you start playing, you can't stop, hockey is really addicting, hope you have fun. Lemme know, or PM me if you got questions that can make things smoother!
Excellent advice.

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08-02-2006, 12:45 AM
  #5
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Good advice so far. But I agree, get as much ice as you can, be it classes, pickup, etc. Since you already know how to skate, it'll just help in getting the legs and feel for the ice back. And definitely invest in good equipment, not top of the line, but stuff you think you'd wear for at least a few seasons. Just have fun out there and you'll find that getting back on the ice is one of the best decisions you've ever made.

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08-02-2006, 05:44 AM
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i just hope I'm not falling down all over myself trying to turn around and stuff. also, I've never been able to practice skating backwards because everytime I've been to a rink, there are always little kids around and I dont want to run into them. In the leagues you are involved in, do they have practices in which they go over this kind of thing?

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08-02-2006, 10:36 AM
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I just got back into inline in the past few months after 5 years of no skating whatsoever and it came back very naturally, so don't worry too much. If you can't always get to the rink, and don't want to bump into people at a public skate, maybe you could try inline skates. It should help you get back in the feel and technique of skating, and allow you to do it anytime you want (provided you have a flat, smooth surface). The first few times back on skates I felt somewhat wobbly and shied away from crossovers and what not because I didn't want to fall, but you could probably get your skills back pretty well after a few days or weeks.

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08-02-2006, 11:17 AM
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Roller is good too. You can really pick up the technique from inlines. I got a hang of backward crossovers while practicing on my inlines...and it translated pretty well on ice. At the very least, you can work on stick handling on your driveway or something.

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08-02-2006, 05:09 PM
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the only problem with inline skates is that i have nowhere to practice. I live on a dirt road and my driveway is made out of dirt and rocks

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08-05-2006, 05:51 PM
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A friend convinced me to start playing ice hockey a few years ago so I have an idea of what you're going through right now. I don't want to scare you but rink skating and hockey skating are totally different -- rink skating is very leisurely, linear and in the same counterclockwise direction. Hockey skating is a lot of stops and starts, changing speeds and changing direction. Don't try skimping (like I did) by wearing warmup pants instead of hockey pants -- hockey pants provide really good, necessary protection for your legs, hips, kidneys, etc. You'll appreciate them every time you fall or block a shot, plus you can probably find a used pair on the cheap -- up in Massachusetts there's a chain of stores called Play It Again Sports where you can get good deals on used equipment. I assume there's something similar where you are. You can also buy used knee/shin pads, elbow pads and chest protector but spend whatever you need to get a new, comfortable pair of skates, gloves that fit you like Isotoners, a helmet with a cage and a cup.
I'd definitely recommend wood sticks until you're sure what curve you like on your blade, the flex of the shaft, etc.

As far as practicing your skating at a public rink, most people skate around the perimeter. The inside of the circle is (often) much less crowded and available for "practice". Center ice is where the figure skaters do their thing but you should be able to stake out an area along either blueline. If your schedule allows it try to go some morning during the week.

All in all, I say go for it (at the beginner level). You'll never sweat as much or hurt in as many places, but I doubt you'll ever have as much fun either.

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08-05-2006, 09:00 PM
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One thing you should practice alot is your stopping and starting, as well as turning (Using crossovers) Because if you can't turn quickly, your gonna be in trouble. Oh yah, also, practice shooting the puck, any time you can, I always found it extremely helpful when I played.

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08-05-2006, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
A friend convinced me to start playing ice hockey a few years ago so I have an idea of what you're going through right now. I don't want to scare you but rink skating and hockey skating are totally different -- rink skating is very leisurely, linear and in the same counterclockwise direction. Hockey skating is a lot of stops and starts, changing speeds and changing direction. Don't try skimping (like I did) by wearing warmup pants instead of hockey pants -- hockey pants provide really good, necessary protection for your legs, hips, kidneys, etc. You'll appreciate them every time you fall or block a shot, plus you can probably find a used pair on the cheap -- up in Massachusetts there's a chain of stores called Play It Again Sports where you can get good deals on used equipment. I assume there's something similar where you are. You can also buy used knee/shin pads, elbow pads and chest protector but spend whatever you need to get a new, comfortable pair of skates, gloves that fit you like Isotoners, a helmet with a cage and a cup.
I'd definitely recommend wood sticks until you're sure what curve you like on your blade, the flex of the shaft, etc.

As far as practicing your skating at a public rink, most people skate around the perimeter. The inside of the circle is (often) much less crowded and available for "practice". Center ice is where the figure skaters do their thing but you should be able to stake out an area along either blueline. If your schedule allows it try to go some morning during the week.

All in all, I say go for it (at the beginner level). You'll never sweat as much or hurt in as many places, but I doubt you'll ever have as much fun either.
To go along with this sorta....put on all your pads when you go to an open skate. Though you look like a dork..or you get questions like, "Do you play for the Blue Jackets?" it's worth it. Cause open skating is a bit leisurely, and skating with pads on is different. Recommend that if the ice is empty...pick out a corner for you to go back and forth doing starts and stops. And if the rink is really empty pick out a circle and skate it doing crossovers, forwards and back.

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08-06-2006, 02:45 PM
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I started playing about 3 years ago, so I'll give you some of my "wisdom" if you can call it that;

1. Learn to skate. I went to lots of public sessions before I ever bought pads. I taught myself to stop, start, do crossovers and pivots (I was thrilled the first time I did a hockey stop). Even after I started playing, I continued to go to public sessions to learn backward crossovers and improve on my edges. To me the main benefit is that I can contribute even if the game is a level above me because I can use my skating to be a reasonably effective forechecker. I'm pretty good at getting opposing dmen to cough up the puck or throw it wildly out of the zone. Also it's great to have that speed when a defenseman makes a mistake because you'll get a breakaway. I have 4 goals in 4 games in my league, and 2 of those goals came from clean breakaways.

2. Get your *** kicked. I go to open hockey where I know that the skaters are better than me (which is most of them) I've played defense and been waxed by more forwards flying down the wing than you can imagine. But remember this. EVERY time it happens, you learn something and improve. One caveat is that you need to at least somewhat competitive. Standing there struggling to move your skates while guys blow by you won't teach you anything.

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08-06-2006, 02:50 PM
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To go along with this sorta....put on all your pads when you go to an open skate. Though you look like a dork..or you get questions like, "Do you play for the Blue Jackets?" it's worth it. Cause open skating is a bit leisurely, and skating with pads on is different. Recommend that if the ice is empty...pick out a corner for you to go back and forth doing starts and stops. And if the rink is really empty pick out a circle and skate it doing crossovers, forwards and back.
Not sure I agree with this. Skating with full pads on will make you self concious (unless you are an unusually secure person), especially if you're a bit awkward out that as we all are when we start. Skating with pads is harder than skating without, but I think it's just more important to get comfortable out there first. I've seen beginners go out for open sessions with full pads, and I admire their gonads, but I've never seen one stick with it. When I was teaching myself to skate at the public sessions, I would have fun, try to imitate moves I saw other skaters do, and invite family/friends to come with me.

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08-06-2006, 03:55 PM
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well i got my equipment yesterday. One setback that i had however was that when i was parking my car, i accidentally nudged up against someone elses truck. It didnt really do much to the truck (actually it stripped some of the paint off my car) There were these hockey players standing around, and one of the guys was giving me ***** for nudging the truck and just walking away (it wasnt even his truck) He was being a complete *****. He went inside and told the coach. The coach however was pretty cool and told me that guy was an a$$hole and not to worry about him, but it sort of left a sour taste in my mouth that this was perhaps what i was in for if i wanted to play.

Anyway, as far as skating goes, my guess is that once i put on my gear, and get into the game, i will be more likely to try to practice my stopping and other things because there is less of a fear of getting hurt. does anyone here know the proper way on how to stop. if so, reply to this

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08-07-2006, 07:37 PM
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Yeah some guys are plain butts...so whatcha end up getting?

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08-07-2006, 08:54 PM
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well i got my equipment yesterday. One setback that i had however was that when i was parking my car, i accidentally nudged up against someone elses truck. It didnt really do much to the truck (actually it stripped some of the paint off my car) There were these hockey players standing around, and one of the guys was giving me ***** for nudging the truck and just walking away (it wasnt even his truck) He was being a complete *****. He went inside and told the coach. The coach however was pretty cool and told me that guy was an a$$hole and not to worry about him, but it sort of left a sour taste in my mouth that this was perhaps what i was in for if i wanted to play.
My experiance has been that hockey players, in general, are the biggest jerk offs in sports. Sorry, just my experiance, and I've played pretty much every sport.

Quote:
Anyway, as far as skating goes, my guess is that once i put on my gear, and get into the game, i will be more likely to try to practice my stopping and other things because there is less of a fear of getting hurt. does anyone here know the proper way on how to stop. if so, reply to this
Stopping has less to do with the fear of getting hurt than it does balance and ankle strength. Even if you were completely fearless, built up some speed and turned your skates sideways at the perfect angle, your ankles would collapse and you would tumble to the ice; there is a tremendous amount of torque on your ankles when you stop. To learn to stop, I skated in circles and gradually learned to shave the ice. I think most people learn to stop by learning the snowplow stop first, then the one footed snowplow, then adding the back skate.

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08-08-2006, 04:14 AM
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Yeah some guys are plain butts...so whatcha end up getting?
I basically got everything i needed. sidney crosby signature stick, all the padding, and all that other good stuff. I cant think of the brand of skates i bought because everything is still in my car, and I'm too lazy to go look but the costed around 110 bucks. All the equipment together costed around $450. I could have probably gotten some cheaper stuff from the links you provided, but i just felt that it would be better to ask the guys in the pro shop and try everything on before i bought it. It might have costed me a little more, but I'm sure it will be worth it in the long run.

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08-08-2006, 04:16 AM
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My experiance has been that hockey players, in general, are the biggest jerk offs in sports. Sorry, just my experiance, and I've played pretty much every sport.



Stopping has less to do with the fear of getting hurt than it does balance and ankle strength. Even if you were completely fearless, built up some speed and turned your skates sideways at the perfect angle, your ankles would collapse and you would tumble to the ice; there is a tremendous amount of torque on your ankles when you stop. To learn to stop, I skated in circles and gradually learned to shave the ice. I think most people learn to stop by learning the snowplow stop first, then the one footed snowplow, then adding the back skate.

what exactly is the snowplow stop?

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08-08-2006, 10:57 AM
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Heheh, was sorta hoping you'd support your local shop, but the links were the best example I had.

I do think fear is a part of the equation to stopping...if your afraid to do it, then you probably won't even attempt it. But best to do whatever works best for you.

Snowplow...you ever ski? It's pretty much turning your toes inward and sorta plow the snow/ice until you stop. It's kinda like the wedge/triangle/plow stop when you ski.

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08-08-2006, 01:57 PM
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Snowplow...you ever ski? It's pretty much turning your toes inward and sorta plow the snow/ice until you stop. It's kinda like the wedge/triangle/plow stop when you ski.
What he said. IMO the snowplow stop shouldn't be used if you're skating at top speed -- it's a bit awkward and more difficult to keep your balance. But it's fine if you're in a slow glide. Be sure to bend your knees and waist -- like you're going to sit in a chair. It will help you to absorb some of your forward momentum.

For the typical "hockey stop" where you twist your body and kick up a spray of snow, here are a few tips:
  1. Make sure that you're skating fast enough to stop (sounds weird, doesn't it?).
  2. When you turn your body you need to be going fast enough that your skate blades shave a layer of ice once they've dug in. Skate at about half speed and glide just before you decide to stop.
  3. When you twist your body it's a quick, decisive 90-degree turn from your feet to your shoulders.
  4. Pivot on the ball of your feet.
  5. If you're turning to the left, when you've stopped your right foot should be kicked out to the right (bracing you from going forward) and your left should be under your body to support you.

    Hope that helps. If you've got a linoleum floor at home you can actually practice this in your stocking feet. Only difference in doing this on ice is the angle of that outside foot. If it's not angled enough it will dig into the ice rather than shaving it and you'll fall over -- your feet stop short while the top half of you keeps going forward.

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08-08-2006, 02:18 PM
  #22
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The coach however was pretty cool and told me that guy was an a$$hole and not to worry about him, but it sort of left a sour taste in my mouth that this was perhaps what i was in for if i wanted to play.
I've found found most hockey players to be fairly cool guys. Not sure, but your experience seems like a bit of "pack mentality" at work. For guys who've played together for awhile, especially at a higher (more intense level) they tend to band together so if you hurt one you hurt them all. If you're playing in a beginner's league I'd expect it's more low key, and I'd be very surprised if you played with guys like that.


Last edited by EmptyNetter: 08-08-2006 at 02:25 PM.
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08-09-2006, 11:18 AM
  #23
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I basically got everything i needed. sidney crosby signature stick, all the padding, and all that other good stuff. I cant think of the brand of skates i bought because everything is still in my car, and I'm too lazy to go look but the costed around 110 bucks. All the equipment together costed around $450. I could have probably gotten some cheaper stuff from the links you provided, but i just felt that it would be better to ask the guys in the pro shop and try everything on before i bought it. It might have costed me a little more, but I'm sure it will be worth it in the long run.
Reading that again...I got a recommendation for you. Do yourself and teammates a favor and take your stuff out and air it out in your basement or living room or something every time you use it, cuts down on the hockey smell that will be showing soon.

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08-09-2006, 06:14 PM
  #24
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Reading that again...I got a recommendation for you. Do yourself and teammates a favor and take your stuff out and air it out in your basement or living room or something every time you use it, cuts down on the hockey smell that will be showing soon.
lol

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08-13-2006, 04:45 PM
  #25
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What he said. IMO the snowplow stop shouldn't be used if you're skating at top speed -- it's a bit awkward and more difficult to keep your balance. But it's fine if you're in a slow glide. Be sure to bend your knees and waist -- like you're going to sit in a chair. It will help you to absorb some of your forward momentum.

For the typical "hockey stop" where you twist your body and kick up a spray of snow, here are a few tips:
  1. Make sure that you're skating fast enough to stop (sounds weird, doesn't it?).
  2. When you turn your body you need to be going fast enough that your skate blades shave a layer of ice once they've dug in. Skate at about half speed and glide just before you decide to stop.
  3. When you twist your body it's a quick, decisive 90-degree turn from your feet to your shoulders.
  4. Pivot on the ball of your feet.
  5. If you're turning to the left, when you've stopped your right foot should be kicked out to the right (bracing you from going forward) and your left should be under your body to support you.

    Hope that helps. If you've got a linoleum floor at home you can actually practice this in your stocking feet. Only difference in doing this on ice is the angle of that outside foot. If it's not angled enough it will dig into the ice rather than shaving it and you'll fall over -- your feet stop short while the top half of you keeps going forward.


I tried practicing my stops yesterday at the rink. I couldnt do it however. What kept happening was I wasnt able to kick up the ice, and instead, my leg just spun in a circle which caused me to spin out and fall down. However, i did sign up for a pickup league a few days ago. do you think there would be anyone there that would be able to help me out with this?

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