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Why Pouliot?

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Old
08-31-2006, 10:25 AM
  #26
Wild Thing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrisd View Post
I love how everyone is on the he will be a bust bandwagon...

I'm not saying he will be a star or anything...but i find it hilarious.

If he turns out to be a good player, lots of people will be eating crow around here.

95% already have him as a flop...good stuff, only at HF.
People who think he's going to be a bust have good reason for thinking that. It's becoming pretty clear that the kid has a history of serious attitude problems, and if he doesn't overcome those attitude problems, he will be a bust. What's hilarious about that?

If he does grow up and meet his potential, nobody will be happier than I, but right now I wish to god we'd taken Brule when we had the chance.

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08-31-2006, 12:41 PM
  #27
Alison
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As someone who has watched his whole OHL career, not just his WJC preformance and camps, this kid could be great... could be if he gets the right discipline (benched for stupid penalties), also his big head should deflate a little in the pros considering he won't be considered so elite yet. I like Mike Foligno as our coach but he let most of the guys get away with murder (except for Pouliots internal suspention for curfew violation). If directed with a firm hand and proper training these glimpses of greatness could become regular play. Don't give up on him I think he could be great it's just a matter of putting him back in his place. His attitude changed after the draft not after his fathers death. And the question of not enough challenge? Perhaps he should have tried to win the OHL scoring title, perhaps he could have challenged himself to dominate the OHL like Wolski and Shcremp. Instead he floated and chose when he wanted to play and placed himself second on the Wolves with points. That's right he did not even have the most points on the Wolves, most goals yes, but Nick Foligno led the team with points.

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08-31-2006, 04:25 PM
  #28
ceber
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Originally Posted by Wild Thing View Post
It's becoming pretty clear that the kid has a history of serious attitude problems
What are these? Is it just selfish play? That's not really very serious.

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08-31-2006, 04:52 PM
  #29
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What are these? Is it just selfish play? That's not really very serious.
The folks who've seen him play claim he's a loafer. We'll see then, eh?

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08-31-2006, 05:30 PM
  #30
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Originally Posted by Alison View Post
As someone who has watched his whole OHL career, not just his WJC preformance and camps, this kid could be great... could be if he gets the right discipline (benched for stupid penalties), also his big head should deflate a little in the pros considering he won't be considered so elite yet. I like Mike Foligno as our coach but he let most of the guys get away with murder (except for Pouliots internal suspention for curfew violation). If directed with a firm hand and proper training these glimpses of greatness could become regular play. Don't give up on him I think he could be great it's just a matter of putting him back in his place. His attitude changed after the draft not after his fathers death. And the question of not enough challenge? Perhaps he should have tried to win the OHL scoring title, perhaps he could have challenged himself to dominate the OHL like Wolski and Shcremp. Instead he floated and chose when he wanted to play and placed himself second on the Wolves with points. That's right he did not even have the most points on the Wolves, most goals yes, but Nick Foligno led the team with points.
To be fair, Foligno played 65 games, Pouliot only 51. Ben's PPG was the highest at 1.27. One point from someone who also watched his OHL career is that Pouliot is always viciously targeted by the other teams, and usually has no protection whatsoever. I'm sure lots of those "stupid penalties" were a result of frustration at having to deal with the goons himself game after game. Another thing he did was to always express his support for the rest of the team when he gave interviews, and he was especially generous in his praise and support of goalie Kevin Beech, both in those interviews and on-ice encouragement before and during the game. Classy touches, I thought. And I agree, he's going to be good, and maybe better than that.

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08-31-2006, 05:33 PM
  #31
ceber
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Well, I guess the way I'm looking at it is as such: the biggest challenges in the NHL (from what I've heard/read from players) are 1) speed of the game, and 2) maintaining consisntent level of play. Attitude shouldn't affect dealing with 1. That's a physiological problem that some players just hit. They top out at whatever level their max is, for whatever reason. Lots of examples. Attitude can affect 2, but if that's all that's keeping a player from being consistent it can probably be resolved. Still might not, of course, but it's not like being injury prone, etc. If a player wants to play at the highest level and isn't talented enough to afford to take a shift off now and then, he'll fix the problem or he won't play.

To me a serious attitude problem would be something like a history of not working with coaches, disrupting teammates, breaking team rules, etc. When you talk really serious I think you're looking at issues with authority figures outside of hockey as well as in. If the biggest knock on the guy is he's had a season of stupid penalties and didn't dominate night in and out I'm not ready to lean towards the bust button.

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08-31-2006, 06:03 PM
  #32
Alison
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No reason at all to lean towards the bust button. He has the potential and with some firm discipline (like being benched when you take stupid penalties) he should come around. Being picked on by other guys is no excuse for continuous selfish plays. Players knew if they could get under his skin they would be up a man. He never had to defend himself once, plenty of people stepped up to bat for him. I think a year in the AHL will do him some good, and if he can weather that he will be ready for the show.

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09-01-2006, 12:32 AM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerald View Post
One point from someone who also watched his OHL career is that Pouliot is always viciously targeted by the other teams, and usually has no protection whatsoever.
Pouliot has always had plenty of protection. His first year, nobody could so much as hit him hard without having to have a chat with Zach Stortini. Last year, whenever anyone got in his face, they dealt with his teammates, whether it was Staal and Hastings going after Kaleta in Peterborough or Didiomete and even Foligno sticking up for him at other times.

I don't think he has an attitude problem per se. I just don't see the drive in him to succeed. He has skills to make him an NHL star. But if he doesn't find the drive and will to succeed and do what it takes, he may never end up in the NHL. All you have to do is look at the talent Pavel Brendl has. And yet he's never stuck. Talent will only get you so far and I hope that Pouliot finds the will to succeed. It's just not a guarantee.

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09-04-2006, 04:29 PM
  #34
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I think lack of "drive" is a good way to describe him, TFW. He is massively talented, there's no doubt about that. And he certainly has moments during games where he seems to be highly motivated. But I really question his long-term commitment to the "uglier" side of hockey life. Doing all the little things, the preparation work - especially the mental preparation - to ensure his career be more than just a flash in the pan type of thing. Part of the problem may be just a general lack of maturity on his part. But, I have the sense that it runs a little deeper than that. He just doesn't seem to have a handle on maintaining self-motivation. It shows up on occasion, to be sure - but it seems like his motivation just doesn't quite reach the heart.

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Old
09-19-2006, 12:03 PM
  #35
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Why not Pouliot?

Benoit Pouliot is a player who is certainly going to be eagerly anticipated when he starts his first National Hockey League season with the Minnesota Wild. While many can believe that he is not NHL calibre, there are certain aspects of Pouliot's abilities, character and experience that prove otherwise.

[1] Pouliot obviously has the talent to play in Minnesota. I believe that goes without saying. If he did not have the talent, then he would not have been chosen so highly in the 2005 NHL Entry Draft. This is especially true since he beat highly-skilled Czech import forward Marek Kvapil (Saginaw Spirit) and offensive defenceman Michael Vernace (Brampton Battalion) for the 2005 Emms Family Award (OHL Rookie of the Year); he also beat Brandon Wheat Kings goalie extraordinaire Tyler Plante and Columbus Blue Jackets' 2006 first-rounder Derick Brassard (Drummondville Voltigeurs) for the CHL Rookie of the Year. Pouliot has a breed of talent that comes not so much with experience, but with persistence and patience. Being drafted in the eleventh round -- 207th overall -- of an OHL Priority Selection could be enough fodder to make a prospective OHL player think that he is not going anywhere; Pouliot was no exception. But he knew that he had the talent. With that knowledge, and the installation of heart and work ethic, Pouliot set out to show the Sudbury Wolves that he belonged with them, and did he ever.

[2] Pouliot also has unbelievable dedication. He worked out diligently for an ideal weight for the rigourous schedule of the OHL, something that he would know all about, especially playing in Sudbury, one of the teams that is the furthest away in the league. His last season in Hawkesbury proved to be one that cemented his dedication, and he got the chance to play in a few games with the Wolves in the last two months of the year; he also joined them for their first round playoff series.

[3] Pouliot knows what he believes in and much has happened to him that strengthens his beliefs. Pouliot is a young man who has had to endure one of the worst tragedies anyone can go through. On February 14, 2004, Pouliot's beloved father Sylvain died after fighting a long, courageous battle with leukemia. Monsieur Pouliot's death came the day after his son's first OHL game, in which he scored his first OHL goal. Pouliot did not hear about his father's death until he was flown out to Ottawa from Sudbury, and met at the airport by his upset mother, Diane. As well, Pouliot knows the value of a good character off the ice. Normally an irritator on the ice, Pouliot will not stand for someone being unfairly treated off of it. He exhibits gentlemanly qualities and, though he does have a tendency to instill his views upon others, he generally does so out of the goodness of his heart in a rather utilitarian fashion (doing the right thing for the greater good of society as a whole). In relation, he is not afraid to speak his mind; he has been renowned for his charisma and his character, something that has already helped him become a player of notice, personally as well as athletically. For that matter, Pouliot knows the value of remaining grounded. Pouliot does recognize in some respect that he is superbly talented, but he will never admit to it. He lives by the credo of, and I quote, "I never let my head get bigger than my talent."

[4] Pouliot has been developed by great coaches. For two years, he was coached in Sudbury by Mike Foligno, who played in the NHL for over a decade. Foligno taught Pouliot how to lead by not only example, but by precedent, even by former Wolves that Foligno did NOT coach personally. In his play, it is obvious to see the great leadership qualities of Bobby Chaumont, the late Stefan Blaho, Rafal Martynowski and Zackery Stortini. But one can also see other former Wolves in Pouliot, players such as Michael Peca and Jamie Rivers, and even Mike Foligno himself. At the World Juniors in 2006, he was coached by former NHL player and current Red Deer Rebels head coach Brent Sutter, a tough and uniformity-driven disciplinarian who served notice to the kind of regiment that Pouliot will encounter when he plays for another former NHLer, Jacques Lemaire, in Minnesota. Even though he was routinely benched for playing outside of Sutter's system, Pouliot was a force to be reckoned with on Team Canada's power play, and he was among the assist leaders at the tournament; in his first ever IIHF tournament, Pouliot won a gold medal for his country. The most important coach in Pouliot's life, though, has to have been his father. Sylvain Pouliot put all three of his sons (Benoit, his older brother David and his younger brother Hugo) in hockey and coached them diligently. Pouliot credits his father as being the biggest influence in his life. This is evident due to the small cross Pouliot wears around his neck during every game he plays, and it also explains his looking up after winning gold at the World Juniors as to be looking at his dad, watching him from Heaven.

In conclusion, the question should not be "Why Pouliot?" It seems rather evident. Pouliot has everything he needs to be a dominant player in the National Hockey League. It is up only to Pouliot himself as to how far he will go and what he will do to get there.


Last edited by hockeyprincess: 09-19-2006 at 04:07 PM.
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