HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The History of Hockey
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

Keith Primeau and Eric Daze In The New NHL

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
05-11-2013, 11:20 PM
  #1
FelixPotvin29GOAT
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 64
vCash: 500
Keith Primeau and Eric Daze In The Post-Lockout NHL

....


Last edited by FelixPotvin29GOAT: 11-14-2014 at 01:48 AM.
FelixPotvin29GOAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 12:18 AM
  #2
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 19,543
vCash: 500
Primeau and Daze are like many other players in NHL history. Big, long reach, nice skillset and have the ability to take over a game. However, others just like them such as Jason Arnott, Nik Antropov, etc. remind me of players that weren't as dominant as you thought they could be and you can't put your finger on the reason why. Primeau and Daze should have been steamrolling the opposition on the ice. Both were 6'5". Primeau showed the odd glimpse here and there but that's it. Neither player maintained it and it had nothing to do with injuries at all.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 01:18 AM
  #3
Hobnobs
Pinko
 
Hobnobs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Country: Sweden
Posts: 3,688
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Primeau and Daze are like many other players in NHL history. Big, long reach, nice skillset and have the ability to take over a game. However, others just like them such as Jason Arnott, Nik Antropov, etc. remind me of players that weren't as dominant as you thought they could be and you can't put your finger on the reason why. Primeau and Daze should have been steamrolling the opposition on the ice. Both were 6'5". Primeau showed the odd glimpse here and there but that's it. Neither player maintained it and it had nothing to do with injuries at all.
Primeaus inconsistancy in production were a factor both himself and injuries. He was always physical. Daze however wasnt physical at all and his production dropping was a direct result of his back problems.

Hobnobs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 01:45 AM
  #4
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 41,037
vCash: 500
big slow player's tended to struggle after the 2005 rule changes

TheDevilMadeMe is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 03:55 AM
  #5
Hobnobs
Pinko
 
Hobnobs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Country: Sweden
Posts: 3,688
vCash: 500
Dazes career was pretty much over before the lockout and Primeau didnt really struggle with the post lock-out game just concussions.

Hobnobs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 09:36 AM
  #6
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 19,543
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobnobs View Post
Dazes career was pretty much over before the lockout and Primeau didnt really struggle with the post lock-out game just concussions.
Both were older by then as well, especially Primeau. In fact, Primeau had by far his worst regular season in 2004 before the lockout. Neither dominated the way you would think they could have even when the rules favoured bigger lumbering players.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 09:48 AM
  #7
Hobnobs
Pinko
 
Hobnobs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Country: Sweden
Posts: 3,688
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Both were older by then as well, especially Primeau. In fact, Primeau had by far his worst regular season in 2004 before the lockout. Neither dominated the way you would think they could have even when the rules favoured bigger lumbering players.
If Primeau didnt suffer that concussion in '97 and the latter in 2000 playoffs I think he would, not dominated, but been a consistent player in the top-20 maybe 25 with a couple of peaks in the top-10.

He had 42 pts in 45 games in '95 his only season before concussions where he was a top-6 player for a full season (the season after saw the aquisition of Larionov), Primeau still played in the top-6 role in '96 but he wasnt a regular per se.

Daze would have been a decent scorer who potted 25-30 goals per season with a peak here and there beyond that (35 goals region)

Hobnobs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 11:30 AM
  #8
vadim sharifijanov
Rrbata
 
vadim sharifijanov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 10,022
vCash: 500
i don't remember daze that well, because he was always out of the lineup and besides, how often did anyone watch the blackhawks while he was there? but if he'd played to his abilities, would he have been tim kerr, or a poor man's kerr? he had the size, strength, and reach obviously, but didn't play physical. he scored most of his goals in front of the net though, right?

primeau, could have been eric staal, or a more goal scoring version of getzlaf (i.e., staal but more physically dominant). had the body, had the skills, didn't have it between the ears except in brief spurts.


but the king of had the size and the skill but kept disappointing year after year even though he played long enough and contributed enough to not be a bust is viktor kozlov.

vadim sharifijanov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-12-2013, 07:07 PM
  #9
Elever
Hth
 
Elever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,484
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Primeau and Daze are like many other players in NHL history. Big, long reach, nice skillset and have the ability to take over a game. However, others just like them such as Jason Arnott, Nik Antropov, etc. remind me of players that weren't as dominant as you thought they could be and you can't put your finger on the reason why. Primeau and Daze should have been steamrolling the opposition on the ice. Both were 6'5". Primeau showed the odd glimpse here and there but that's it. Neither player maintained it and it had nothing to do with injuries at all.
First of all, Arnott was better than the other two and all three of them were better than Antropov. Secondly, what new NHL are you guys talking about? It lasted for a couple years maybe....right now any skilled player even if he's slow can get the job done. There's enough obstruction for that and core body strength is more important for forwards anyways with how tight defences are.

I'm sure both would've done pretty well right now. The demise of neither player had anything to do with a change of playing style....it was due to age/injury.

Elever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-13-2013, 12:17 AM
  #10
Clown Baby
Registered User
 
Clown Baby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,623
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Both were older by then as well, especially Primeau. In fact, Primeau had by far his worst regular season in 2004 before the lockout. Neither dominated the way you would think they could have even when the rules favoured bigger lumbering players.
Primeau had a great season in '04. He was just given a different role under Hitchcock. The lack of production was a direct result, as was his 6th overall finish in Selke voting.

Clown Baby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-13-2013, 12:26 AM
  #11
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 19,543
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clown Baby View Post
Primeau had a great season in '04. He was just given a different role under Hitchcock. The lack of production was a direct result, as was his 6th overall finish in Selke voting.
He scored 7 goals....................different role or not you aren't producing the way you should. When Primeau was elected to the all-star game in 2004 it has been talked about as one of the worst seasons a player ever got elected to the game, for what it's worth.

Primeau was a good player. But he was the same more or less where he went. On a stacked team with less playing time in Detroit he was the same type of player as when he was in Carolina, and then in Philly from 2000 onwards. I remember the idea that when he went to Philly in 2000 he and Lindros would steamroll the opposition. That's the thing with Primeau, he just never hit a level that seemed to go with his expectations.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-13-2013, 08:38 AM
  #12
pdd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 5,576
vCash: 500
Primeau's career likely would have gone on for a while longer; his offensive numbers declined starting in 2001-02 when he was shifted to a defensive role, and in 2003-04 he was used very sparingly on the PP. His 2004 playoffs which were after the first "big hit" resulted in 9 goals and 16 points in 18 games, and are an example of how good he still was at the time. Phil Esposito even said it was the best performance by a hockey player he had ever seen; ever. Unfortunately, he only played nine more games after that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobnobs View Post
Dazes career was pretty much over before the lockout and Primeau didnt really struggle with the post lock-out game just concussions.
Primeau played 9 games after the lockout, and scored 7 points. His career PPG is lower. Given that he was a bowl of jelly in his mid-30s, that's a pretty good start that didn't end well.

When I think of Daze, I think of a more consistent, more skilled version of Johan Franzen. He had the ability to play a physical hitting game, the size and strength to do it, but played a mostly skill game; using his size and strength to protect the puck but not to attack it. Daze was just peaking in 2002 (top-five LW) when his took some long absences due to injurie that visibly affected his game. Without those injuries, he probably puts up a couple more 70-80 point seasons, and maybe cracks 40 goal a couple times.

pdd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-13-2013, 09:17 AM
  #13
Hobnobs
Pinko
 
Hobnobs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Country: Sweden
Posts: 3,688
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by eva unit zero View Post
Primeau's career likely would have gone on for a while longer; his offensive numbers declined starting in 2001-02 when he was shifted to a defensive role, and in 2003-04 he was used very sparingly on the PP. His 2004 playoffs which were after the first "big hit" resulted in 9 goals and 16 points in 18 games, and are an example of how good he still was at the time. Phil Esposito even said it was the best performance by a hockey player he had ever seen; ever. Unfortunately, he only played nine more games after that.



Primeau played 9 games after the lockout, and scored 7 points. His career PPG is lower. Given that he was a bowl of jelly in his mid-30s, that's a pretty good start that didn't end well.

When I think of Daze, I think of a more consistent, more skilled version of Johan Franzen. He had the ability to play a physical hitting game, the size and strength to do it, but played a mostly skill game; using his size and strength to protect the puck but not to attack it. Daze was just peaking in 2002 (top-five LW) when his took some long absences due to injurie that visibly affected his game. Without those injuries, he probably puts up a couple more 70-80 point seasons, and maybe cracks 40 goal a couple times.
I dont think he reaches 80pts (maybe in the crazy '06 season) but yea 30 goals and 30-40 assists isnt out of the question.

Hobnobs is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:26 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.