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Extending a wooden shaft

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05-14-2013, 01:36 AM
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Primrose Everdeen
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Extending a wooden shaft

So I got a new stick today and tried it out for the first time in my game tonight. It's a good few inches shorter than my old one I'm used to and the shaft is stiffer. I've read plenty about end plugs, but the ones I've found are all for hollow composite/aluminum sticks and mine is wood. Is it even possible to add some kind of extension to it to make it a little longer? If so, how might I go about doing it?

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05-14-2013, 08:13 AM
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jordanking87
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nope, as far as i know extensions will only work with composite and shaft/blade combo sticks. unless you used some kind of strong glue there isnt a product that I know of that allows wooden sticks to be extended....good thing is wood sticks are cheap so you should be able to solve it with a new, longer stick u cancut down appropriately

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05-14-2013, 08:45 AM
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good thing is wood sticks are cheap so you should be able to solve it with a new, longer stick u cancut down appropriately
this. even if it could be done effectively, it wouldn't be cost-effective at all.

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05-14-2013, 09:03 AM
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Yep, just live and learn. It can be a dryland stickhandling stick.

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05-14-2013, 09:29 PM
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If you have an old composite shaft you could use a piece of it as a butt end, and glue it onto the end of your stick after reshaping the wood to fit tightly in the piece of composite shaft. If you're a bit handy with tools, it's quite do-able.

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05-15-2013, 01:52 PM
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Yeah I suppose that would work, like the opposite of a butt end. But I'd just get a new $30 wood stick.

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05-15-2013, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by LarryO View Post
If you have an old composite shaft you could use a piece of it as a butt end, and glue it onto the end of your stick after reshaping the wood to fit tightly in the piece of composite shaft. If you're a bit handy with tools, it's quite do-able.
it could be done, but there would be all sorts of issues. by re-shaping the butt end of the existing wood stick, you'd be severely weakening it by taking off the finish and any fiberglass reinforcement.
combine that with the fact that you'd have to have a good 3" tenon into the composite piece, and it would be hollow beyond that point, and you're liable to break the whole thing off pretty quickly. maybe taking some scrap wood to fill the composite piece would help a little, but really, i see no point in making all the necessary effort.

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05-15-2013, 04:51 PM
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LarryO
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it could be done, but there would be all sorts of issues. by re-shaping the butt end of the existing wood stick, you'd be severely weakening it by taking off the finish and any fiberglass reinforcement.
combine that with the fact that you'd have to have a good 3" tenon into the composite piece, and it would be hollow beyond that point, and you're liable to break the whole thing off pretty quickly. maybe taking some scrap wood to fill the composite piece would help a little, but really, i see no point in making all the necessary effort.
The exact same stresses would occur as with a typical wooden butt end in a composite shaft so it should not break. Physics 101. It might not be worth the effort for some, but if you have the tools and the craftsmanship, it would be a very simple task.

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05-16-2013, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by LarryO View Post
The exact same stresses would occur as with a typical wooden butt end in a composite shaft so it should not break. Physics 101.
OK, smarty. I see your Physics 101 and raise you Common Sense 201.

The same stresses, but on different materials. A typical wooden butt end is a single solid piece of wood. A wooden stick is made of laminated layers of materials, and is reinforced on the outside. Reducing the size of the end to fit in the composite shaft is not (in terms of physics) simple as simply shaving an insignificant amount off of a solid piece of wood - it inevitably involves compromising the structural integrity of the materials.

All this doesn't even begin to take into account the inevitable bizarre feeling that would result from having a hollow composite end on an otherwise all-wood stick.

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05-16-2013, 09:16 AM
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This can be done very easily with a wood dowel and some carpenter's glue. You can even reinforce it with a bit of mesh drywall tape. The fusion point will likely be in the palm of your hand and won't really be under that much stress.

When I was a kid, one of my coaches used to pick broken sticks out of the garbage and fuse them at the mid-point of the shaft. It won't hold up to a Shea Webber slapper, but who cares.

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05-16-2013, 10:40 AM
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This can be done very easily with a wood dowel and some carpenter's glue. You can even reinforce it with a bit of mesh drywall tape. The fusion point will likely be in the palm of your hand and won't really be under that much stress.

When I was a kid, one of my coaches used to pick broken sticks out of the garbage and fuse them at the mid-point of the shaft. It won't hold up to a Shea Webber slapper, but who cares.
That method makes a lot more sense, at least.

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05-16-2013, 02:14 PM
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LarryO
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Originally Posted by McDugan View Post
OK, smarty. I see your Physics 101 and raise you Common Sense 201.

The same stresses, but on different materials. A typical wooden butt end is a single solid piece of wood. A wooden stick is made of laminated layers of materials, and is reinforced on the outside. Reducing the size of the end to fit in the composite shaft is not (in terms of physics) simple as simply shaving an insignificant amount off of a solid piece of wood - it inevitably involves compromising the structural integrity of the materials.

All this doesn't even begin to take into account the inevitable bizarre feeling that would result from having a hollow composite end on an otherwise all-wood stick.
Laminated wood can be even stronger than solid wood. I've made butt ends out of laminated pieces of wooden hockey sticks and they were extremely solid. The weak link is on the reduced cross section of wood that is inserted into the composite shaft. Reverse the roles and the reduced cross section of wood is in the same place. And it wouldn't feel bizarre, most people wouldn't even notice once it's taped up.
BTW, the sarcasm is uncalled for.

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05-16-2013, 03:24 PM
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I congratulate you and apologize for hurting your feelings by responding to your condecension (Physics 101? Seriously?) with sarcasm. You clearly have more experience actually doing this than I do; I'm not sold on the idea. Whatever. Live it up.

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