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Last player to play by birth decade

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05-14-2013, 01:12 AM
  #1
Megahab
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Last player to play by birth decade

Who were the last players to play in the NHL for each decade of birth? For example, who was the last NHL player that was born in the 1960s? 50s? 40s? 30s? 20s? 10s? 1800s?

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05-14-2013, 01:24 AM
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King Forsberg
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Dwayne Roloson has to be the last player to play born in the 1960s.

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05-14-2013, 01:31 AM
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MS
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Offhand, I think this is correct :

1960s - Dwayne Roloson
1950s - Kjell Samuelsson
1940s - Chico Resch
1930s - Bobby Hull
1920s - Gordie Howe (who played his last game after the last player from the 1930s was finished).

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05-14-2013, 02:44 PM
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eastcoaster
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I think these are the right guys.

Lefty Wilson 1910's
Moe Roberts 1900's
Ching Johnson 1890's
Hugh Lehman 1880's
Jack Laviolette 1870's

Wilson and Roberts were emergency goaltenders and they were both team trainers at the time they were called in to play.

I believe Butch Bouchard (1910's) and Dit Clapper (1900's) were the last everyday players from their respective decades.

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05-14-2013, 04:18 PM
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Jack DiBiase
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Ok, that was easy. How about predicting who is going to be the last mohican of the 70's (or even the 80's).

70's candidates:

Joe Thornton, Born July 79. Very durable guy. Should be able to maintain at least a powerplay specialist role until the age of 40.

Patrick Marleau, Born September 79. Very late birthday and a true ironman, so he is a very good candidate. Still puts on great numbers.

Pavel Datsyuk, Born July 78. Very smart player, who started his career at a relatively old age, so he should have a lot left in the tank. Has not shown any signs of slowing down. Could have an Igor Larionov -like end of the career.

Marian Hossa, Born January 79. Has been having some injury problems lately, but before that had only missed a few games in his career. His contract lasts until he is 42, but since the last 4 season only adds a total of 4 million to his pay check, I expect him to retire before that.

Zdeno Chara, Born March 77. A true physical freak and a real athlete. Plays a game which could be transformed into a pure defensive mode until he is way over 40. If his body doesn't detoriate, he could be a serious candidate, even though he is almost 3 years older than some other guys.

Jarome Iginla, Born July 77. Like Chara, he is much older that some, but he has been very durable and consistant his entire career. I can't see him slowing down before the age of 40. I could see him having a Selanne -like twilight career.


Obscure picks:

Rob Scuderi, Born December 78. Made an NHL breakthrough at the age of 30. Hasn't missed a game since the 09/10 season. There's always a place for a reliable guy, and Scuderi should be able to continue this role until 40+.

Pascal Dupuis, Born April 79. Another late boomer, who doesn't have much mileage. Only started producing points at a very old age, so there's still much left in him. Could also have a fast freefall, if he doesn't re-sign with Pens (and Crosby).

Martin St. Louis, Born June 75. Becomes the first to win the Art Ross at the age of 50.


Anybody dare to take the 80's?

I'm going with Jordan Staal Sep 88, just because he was said to be the next Messier.


Last edited by Jack DiBiase: 05-14-2013 at 04:24 PM.
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05-14-2013, 04:43 PM
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS View Post
... 1940s - Chico Resch
I think your right about Resch, 40's Baby, though Dave Keon had a longer career, born in 1940 retiring (albeit with a break in the WHA but still pro) in 82 as opposed to Chico who was born in 48, playing in the NHL from 71-87.

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05-14-2013, 06:22 PM
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Big Phil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS View Post
Offhand, I think this is correct :

1960s - Dwayne Roloson
1950s - Kjell Samuelsson
1940s - Chico Resch
1930s - Bobby Hull
1920s - Gordie Howe (who played his last game after the last player from the 1930s was finished).
Wow, I guess so. Chico was 38 in his final season of 1986-'87. Was there really no one else in the NHL that was even 37 years old at that time? I know there was a bit of a transition with the 1970s stars retiring and such..............

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack DiBiase View Post
Ok, that was easy. How about predicting who is going to be the last mohican of the 70's (or even the 80's).

70's candidates:

Joe Thornton, Born July 79. Very durable guy. Should be able to maintain at least a powerplay specialist role until the age of 40.

Patrick Marleau, Born September 79. Very late birthday and a true ironman, so he is a very good candidate. Still puts on great numbers.

Pavel Datsyuk, Born July 78. Very smart player, who started his career at a relatively old age, so he should have a lot left in the tank. Has not shown any signs of slowing down. Could have an Igor Larionov -like end of the career.

Marian Hossa, Born January 79. Has been having some injury problems lately, but before that had only missed a few games in his career. His contract lasts until he is 42, but since the last 4 season only adds a total of 4 million to his pay check, I expect him to retire before that.

Zdeno Chara, Born March 77. A true physical freak and a real athlete. Plays a game which could be transformed into a pure defensive mode until he is way over 40. If his body doesn't detoriate, he could be a serious candidate, even though he is almost 3 years older than some other guys.

Jarome Iginla, Born July 77. Like Chara, he is much older that some, but he has been very durable and consistant his entire career. I can't see him slowing down before the age of 40. I could see him having a Selanne -like twilight career.


Obscure picks:

Rob Scuderi, Born December 78. Made an NHL breakthrough at the age of 30. Hasn't missed a game since the 09/10 season. There's always a place for a reliable guy, and Scuderi should be able to continue this role until 40+.

Pascal Dupuis, Born April 79. Another late boomer, who doesn't have much mileage. Only started producing points at a very old age, so there's still much left in him. Could also have a fast freefall, if he doesn't re-sign with Pens (and Crosby).

Martin St. Louis, Born June 75. Becomes the first to win the Art Ross at the age of 50.
Thornton and Marleau both broke in at 18. They've been in the NHL for 16 years now. That's a long time and while none of them have had a string of lengthy Cup runs, or even one, they both have scored a lot and that burns you out. Lots of ice time too for them. On the flip side they rarely get hurt.

Iggy is getting too old, and while I love how St. Louis is aging the truth is he's going to be 38 right now. He is already much older than the youngest 1970s birthdates. Datsyuk, despite a little bit of a late start is often involved in long playoff runs. That can burn you out. I guess a lot depends on whether or not he wants to hang around as a checker once his "Datsyukian" moves thin out.

You know, on that list I actually like Scuderi. The Pens were silly to let him go. And for whatever reason I see a lot of Mathieu Schneider in him as a guy who will just hang around - justifiably - for a long time.

Chara just isn't slowing down either. I can't imagine him stopping playing anytime in the next 5 years at least. His frame allows him to absorb a lot more punishment than others.

Quote:
Anybody dare to take the 80's?

I'm going with Jordan Staal Sep 88, just because he was said to be the next Messier
You figure he'll age well since there is always a role for a guy like him. Plus he doesn't put on the mileage on a production level like the stars do.

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05-14-2013, 08:56 PM
  #8
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Wow, I guess so. Chico was 38 in his final season of 1986-'87. Was there really no one else in the NHL that was even 37 years old at that time? I know there was a bit of a transition with the 1970s stars retiring and such..............
He was the last player left from the 1940s by two full seasons, as well.

Brad Park, Ivan Boldirev, and Butch Goring all retired in the summer of 1985.

To put that in perspective, Resch was the oldest player in the league when he was the same age that Iginla/Doan/Chara are now.

Players born between 1947 and 1958 had very, very short careers relative to the generation that came before and after them. Is a function of how quickly the speed and pace of the game improved year on year during the 1980s - a game from 1990 looks like it's from a different planet compared to 1980 in terms of the speed, and the time and space players had.

In the mid-1980s, when you were 30, you were done. Especially for forwards.

One of my favourite stats relates to Bryan Trottier - a guy perceived as being 'done early' because he played so many playoff games. In 1988-89, the year his production fell off a cliff (fell from 82 points to 45), he was 32 years old - younger than the Sedins are now. But in that year, he was one of only 4 forwards in the entire league aged 32 or older to score more than 30 points. If anything, his offensive ability had substantial staying power relative to his peers.

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Old
05-14-2013, 11:03 PM
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Big Phil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS View Post
He was the last player left from the 1940s by two full seasons, as well.

Brad Park, Ivan Boldirev, and Butch Goring all retired in the summer of 1985.

To put that in perspective, Resch was the oldest player in the league when he was the same age that Iginla/Doan/Chara are now.

Players born between 1947 and 1958 had very, very short careers relative to the generation that came before and after them. Is a function of how quickly the speed and pace of the game improved year on year during the 1980s - a game from 1990 looks like it's from a different planet compared to 1980 in terms of the speed, and the time and space players had.

In the mid-1980s, when you were 30, you were done. Especially for forwards.

One of my favourite stats relates to Bryan Trottier - a guy perceived as being 'done early' because he played so many playoff games. In 1988-89, the year his production fell off a cliff (fell from 82 points to 45), he was 32 years old - younger than the Sedins are now. But in that year, he was one of only 4 forwards in the entire league aged 32 or older to score more than 30 points. If anything, his offensive ability had substantial staying power relative to his peers.
I think there has to be more to it than that though. The game is faster in 2013 than it was in 1990. Yet there are players that stick around close to 40. It is weird looking at it that way because it is really the only era that this happens from the original 6 onward (players from the pre-War years usually didn't play long in their 30s). You look at all the players from Howe, Bower, Horton, Delvecchio, Cheevers, Bucyk, Hull, Keon and even goalies like Plante, Hall, Sawchuk and Worsley. Fast forward to today and you see Chelios, Lidstrom, Larionov, Brodeur, etc. playing to at least 40. Recchi was 43.

So why just that particular time in the NHL? Each era has a different change and yet we saw older players play longer. It isn't just the speed of the game, because that's always progressed. Look at the names of the players, Clarke won a Selke a year before he retired, Perreault was still a PPG guy. There have to be other reasons than this. And I can't think of them right now. Because that it a big discrepancy from pretty much every other decade.

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Old
05-15-2013, 01:43 AM
  #10
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Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
I think there has to be more to it than that though. The game is faster in 2013 than it was in 1990. Yet there are players that stick around close to 40. It is weird looking at it that way because it is really the only era that this happens from the original 6 onward (players from the pre-War years usually didn't play long in their 30s). You look at all the players from Howe, Bower, Horton, Delvecchio, Cheevers, Bucyk, Hull, Keon and even goalies like Plante, Hall, Sawchuk and Worsley. Fast forward to today and you see Chelios, Lidstrom, Larionov, Brodeur, etc. playing to at least 40. Recchi was 43.

So why just that particular time in the NHL? Each era has a different change and yet we saw older players play longer. It isn't just the speed of the game, because that's always progressed. Look at the names of the players, Clarke won a Selke a year before he retired, Perreault was still a PPG guy. There have to be other reasons than this. And I can't think of them right now. Because that it a big discrepancy from pretty much every other decade.
Yeah, it's gotten faster since 1990. But gradually.

Watch a game from 2000, and it doesn't look *that* different from now. Watch a game from 1990 compared to 2000, and the systems and defensive play have improved but the players themselves aren't that much more skilled.

But between 1980 and 1990, it's just a chasm of difference. The odd superstar could hang in there against the change until they were 35 or so, but for the most part the game passed guys by very, very quickly.

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05-15-2013, 04:52 PM
  #11
LeBlondeDemon10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS View Post
He was the last player left from the 1940s by two full seasons, as well.

Brad Park, Ivan Boldirev, and Butch Goring all retired in the summer of 1985.

To put that in perspective, Resch was the oldest player in the league when he was the same age that Iginla/Doan/Chara are now.

Players born between 1947 and 1958 had very, very short careers relative to the generation that came before and after them. Is a function of how quickly the speed and pace of the game improved year on year during the 1980s - a game from 1990 looks like it's from a different planet compared to 1980 in terms of the speed, and the time and space players had.

In the mid-1980s, when you were 30, you were done. Especially for forwards.

One of my favourite stats relates to Bryan Trottier - a guy perceived as being 'done early' because he played so many playoff games. In 1988-89, the year his production fell off a cliff (fell from 82 points to 45), he was 32 years old - younger than the Sedins are now. But in that year, he was one of only 4 forwards in the entire league aged 32 or older to score more than 30 points. If anything, his offensive ability had substantial staying power relative to his peers.
How fast would the game look today if we put the red line back in? Even if there wasn't the influence of the defensive systems, I don't think its as significant as the videos from two different eras with different rules suggets.

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05-18-2013, 08:44 PM
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Gonna go with one player not listed and might be off the radar because he's a goatlender: Roberto Luongo (4/4/1979). He's been mostly injury-free for his career and even if he loses his starting job in his late 30s, I can see him taking the last 3-4 years of his career as a backup.

Predicting a player from the 80s is too difficult. I like the suggestion of Jordan Staal but I'm gonna go with Kyle Turris (8/14/89)

This page might be helpful for this thread: http://www.hockey-reference.com/friv....cgi?year=1989

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05-18-2013, 09:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS View Post
Offhand, I think this is correct :

1960s - Dwayne Roloson (born 10/12/1969, played until 2011-12 season)
1950s - Kjell Samuelsson (born 10/18/1958, played until 1998-99 season)
1940s - Chico Resch (born 7/10/1948, played until 1986-87 season)
1930s - Bobby Hull (born 1/3/1939, played until 1979-80 season). Add Carl Brewer (born 10/21/38, also played until 1979-80 season)
1920s - Gordie Howe (who played his last game after the last player from the 1930s was finished. The next closest player born in the 20s (Gump Worsley, 5/14/1929) retired after the 1973-74 season.
correct, and added some birthdates and season info

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05-19-2013, 01:42 AM
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I'd put my money on Hossa.

Nowadays the players who last the longest are the ones who spent their pre-NHL time in Europe or the NCAA. Among the oldest players from this past season, Ray Whitney is the only one I can think of who played in one of the three Canadian Junior Leagues.

The CHL prepares players for the NHL better than anywhere else, but those long seasons and playoffs can accumulate a lot of wear and tear on a players body.

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05-19-2013, 02:47 AM
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Chris Chelios - Cretaceous period

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05-20-2013, 11:34 PM
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Chris Chelios - Cretaceous period
One of the few who didn't evolve into a bird.

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05-20-2013, 11:44 PM
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I'd put my money on Hossa.

Nowadays the players who last the longest are the ones who spent their pre-NHL time in Europe or the NCAA. Among the oldest players from this past season, Ray Whitney is the only one I can think of who played in one of the three Canadian Junior Leagues.

The CHL prepares players for the NHL better than anywhere else, but those long seasons and playoffs can accumulate a lot of wear and tear on a players body.
Has this been proven in any sort of empirical way?

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05-20-2013, 11:44 PM
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Gonna go with one player not listed and might be off the radar because he's a goatlender: Roberto Luongo (4/4/1979). He's been mostly injury-free for his career and even if he loses his starting job in his late 30s, I can see him taking the last 3-4 years of his career as a backup.

Predicting a player from the 80s is too difficult. I like the suggestion of Jordan Staal but I'm gonna go with Kyle Turris (8/14/89)

This page might be helpful for this thread: http://www.hockey-reference.com/friv....cgi?year=1989
I doubt Turris is a good enough player to play long enough to outlast actual good players who are 1-2-3 years older than him.

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05-20-2013, 11:45 PM
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Yeah, it's gotten faster since 1990. But gradually.

Watch a game from 2000, and it doesn't look *that* different from now. Watch a game from 1990 compared to 2000, and the systems and defensive play have improved but the players themselves aren't that much more skilled.

But between 1980 and 1990, it's just a chasm of difference. The odd superstar could hang in there against the change until they were 35 or so, but for the most part the game passed guys by very, very quickly.
This post is absolutely correct.

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05-21-2013, 01:45 AM
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I'd put my money on Hossa.

Nowadays the players who last the longest are the ones who spent their pre-NHL time in Europe or the NCAA. Among the oldest players from this past season, Ray Whitney is the only one I can think of who played in one of the three Canadian Junior Leagues.

The CHL prepares players for the NHL better than anywhere else, but those long seasons and playoffs can accumulate a lot of wear and tear on a players body.
Mind you, Marian Hossa also spent a year in the CHL. Where he got his knee destroyed...

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05-21-2013, 02:55 AM
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What was the name of the i believe Rangers staff and former player that got into a playoff game i believe, way back? I believe he was about 44 years of age at the time. Oh yes, Lester Patrick. How does he stack up in this instance? Woh, it looks like Hugh Lehman also finished in 1928 and DID NOT PLAY IN THE PLAYOFFS. Patrick is the winner here i believe.


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05-21-2013, 07:17 AM
  #22
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What was the name of the i believe Rangers staff and former player that got into a playoff game i believe, way back? I believe he was about 44 years of age at the time. Oh yes, Lester Patrick. How does he stack up in this instance? Woh, it looks like Hugh Lehman also finished in 1928 and DID NOT PLAY IN THE PLAYOFFS. Patrick is the winner here i believe.
Yeah, I think he was 44. Wow. To read the articles, you'd think he was about 78 and rose from a wheelchair to suit up.

Of course, 44 did seem rather old when I first read that story.

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05-21-2013, 05:53 PM
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Yeah, I think he was 44. Wow. To read the articles, you'd think he was about 78 and rose from a wheelchair to suit up.

Of course, 44 did seem rather old when I first read that story.
Yeah. When i decided to google for the name myself and then edit my post i also snuck in a correction of my guess about his age. Originally i had put 48 there.

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