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Old
10-04-2006, 09:56 AM
  #26
Tricolore#20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 417 View Post
That's the thing though...everybody portrays an image, who doesn't?

I just don't understand why his style of clothing is an issue when he's in a casual environment where a dress code isn't required.

I find it dumb
Exactly. He is a hockey player not a politician, a lawyer or a physician. Some people just need to chill out when it comes to those kinds of things.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:02 AM
  #27
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Originally Posted by habfan4 View Post
In a perfect world you'd be correct.

Unfortunately people don't give their fellow man the benefit of the doubt, they often don't look past their stereotypical preconceptions on colour, race, religion and clothing etc...
That shouldn't have to be Mike Ribeiro's problem. It's society's

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10-04-2006, 10:07 AM
  #28
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Originally Posted by habfan4 View Post
In a perfect world you'd be correct.

Unfortunately people don't give their fellow man the benefit of the doubt, they often don't look past their stereotypical preconceptions on colour, race, religion and clothing etc...
My best friend's a school principal. During his first post as principal,[an elementary school on Mtl's south shore] he concluded that he'd rather kids didn't come to school with their hair dyed blue. We talked about it, I love the guy like a brother, but don't have to agree with him. I ranted about kid's rights of expression and it having nothing to do with academics. I reminded him of our great crusade in gr.9 to be allowed to wear jeans in school.

His pov was that school was supposed to give kids an expectation of conditions in the real world and a high % of employers would overlook the candidate with the rainbow head.

He suggested it at a parent/teacher meeting and never heard a word of complaint.
Disciplinary problems, issues of respect, have always been significantly lower at his schools. He's been a sought after ufa in the school system. He still maintains when talking to me that, yeah, you're right about freedom of expression, but my way works. You have to pick which issue is more important. So, who knows, I'm still uncomfortable with the idea, but he's had results.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:10 AM
  #29
417
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Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
417, it's not really a right or wrong thing. I don't necessarily like conformity a whole lot. I don't like supressing who I am in situations but you learn a bit about choosing your battles at some point.

I have an early 20's flower child/hippie in the family. I don't think her views, dress, attitudes towards the world at large are wrong in any way, I agree with some stuff, not with everything , it isn't an issue with us. It is, we've explained to her, when she's looking for work. Get the job, establish yourself, become of value, than show more of yourself. Playing the game goes against my nature, but I do it.
I agree...when I look for a job, or go to an event. I'm smart enough to tone down my indiviuality. However, that's not any different for anyone looking for a job or going to an event.

I just find it dumb and borderline prejudicial (is that even a word?) that someone becomes immature or irresponsible just because he's wearing earings or has his hat slightly tilted. Does he somehow magically become mature and responsible once he removes the earings and adjusts his hat?

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:16 AM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habfan4 View Post
In a perfect world you'd be correct.

Unfortunately people don't give their fellow man the benefit of the doubt, they often don't look past their stereotypical preconceptions on colour, race, religion and clothing etc...
What about if they headbutt somebody in the chest?

Cap

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:17 AM
  #31
habfan4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 417 View Post
That shouldn't have to be Mike Ribeiro's problem. It's society's
Mike doesn't live in a vacuum, his "image" rightly or wrongly is going to affect how others perceive him. That goes double when we are talking about the hockey press in Montréal.

At any rate this issue really is not the primary reason for Ribeiro's departure from Montréal, it was fodder for 2nd rate columnists who can't keep their criticisms of players from becoming personal (read. Jack Todd)

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:18 AM
  #32
mcphee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 417 View Post
I agree...when I look for a job, or go to an event. I'm smart enough to tone down my indiviuality. However, that's not any different for anyone looking for a job or going to an event.

I just find it dumb and borderline prejudicial (is that even a word?) that someone becomes immature or irresponsible just because he's wearing earings or has his hat slightly tilted. Does he somehow magically become mature and responsible once he removes the earings and adjusts his hat?
I guess the most honest answer I can give is that if somone walks into an interview dressed in the way you describe, my feeling is that more often than not, the person is more concerned about showing off who he is than the task at hand. I would take that as a sign of immaturity. This doesn't apply in all cases, but as general rule of thumb for me. Maybe that's unfair, but hwen you have choices to make, you often just go on instinct.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:19 AM
  #33
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Originally Posted by Capitano View Post
What about if they headbutt somebody in the chest?

Cap
If it's Materazzi who receives the "Coup de boule" then your stock rises, if it's the Queen then it plummets. (unless you happen to be Irish)

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:21 AM
  #34
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In the end, it's the total package that defines you. If you dress "strangely" or whatever, unfortunately you will make a certain impression on some people. After that it really depends on how you perform - and your attitude. Basically it's the whole package.

In the end Ribs wasn't the second coming and the media ate him up. The media is like that. Just believe what you want to believe, don't listen to the media.

Cap

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:23 AM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 417 View Post
That shouldn't have to be Mike Ribeiro's problem. It's society's

I figure society has more pressing problems that the alleged ostracisation of a multi-millionaire hockey player who wears his pants too low and his hat at an angle.

Poor Mike. Maybe if he'd put more effort into his training and less into his sartorial "signature", he'd still be here. Maybe he doesn't care. But his lackadaisical demeanor and his "too cool for you" attitude rubbed a lot of people the wrong way, more so than his clothes or the way he wore them, I suspect.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:26 AM
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 417 View Post
I agree...when I look for a job, or go to an event. I'm smart enough to tone down my indiviuality. However, that's not any different for anyone looking for a job or going to an event.

I just find it dumb and borderline prejudicial (is that even a word?) that someone becomes immature or irresponsible just because he's wearing earings or has his hat slightly tilted. Does he somehow magically become mature and responsible once he removes the earings and adjusts his hat?
Let's not lose sight 417. It's got nothing to do with all that. It's just because Ribs is gone and they didn't like him so they're trashing him. It's very stupid, I agree.

Do you think if he played like Ovechkin or Crosby they'd have a problem with the way he dressed? Of course they'd tell you that those things go hand in hand, but of course they're wrong.

Times are changing, but right now the media is a bunch of old farts. Sorry mcphee

Cap

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:26 AM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gros Bill View Post
I figure society has more pressing problems that the alleged ostracisation of a multi-millionaire hockey player who wears his pants too low and his hat at an angle.

Poor Mike. Maybe if he'd put more effort into his training and less into his sartorial "signature", he'd still be here. Maybe he doesn't care. But his lackadaisical demeanor and his "too cool for you" attitude rubbed a lot of people the wrong way, more so than his clothes or the way he wore them, I suspect.
Exactly.

Cap

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:28 AM
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
I guess the most honest answer I can give is that if somone walks into an interview dressed in the way you describe, my feeling is that more often than not, the person is more concerned about showing off who he is than the task at hand. I would take that as a sign of immaturity. This doesn't apply in all cases, but as general rule of thumb for me. Maybe that's unfair, but hwen you have choices to make, you often just go on instinct.
Of course McPhee, I agree...I mean anyone who goes for a job interview should be wearing some sort of professional look.

I'm talking about in environments where there is no dress code, why is Mike Ribeiro considered immature or a cancer because he chooses to wear his jeans a little looser than Saku Koivu for example. What makes Koivu's look more 'proper'? Who decided that was more 'proper'?

That's my point about perception.

I mean, if a guy walks into a mall wearing country casual clothing and shoots up 100 people, what he was wearing will never become an issue.

But if he's wearing a black trenchcoat or baggy pants and a tilted hat, you can get your *** it becomes an issue. (sorry, I used an exteme example to get my point across)

Anyways, were kind of deviating from the subject, but it's something i've been hearing/reading on the TV and in the papers so I thought i'd chime in.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:32 AM
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gros Bill View Post
I figure society has more pressing problems that the alleged ostracisation of a multi-millionaire hockey player who wears his pants too low and his hat at an angle.
Poor Mike. Maybe if he'd put more effort into his training and less into his sartorial "signature", he'd still be here. Maybe he doesn't care. But his lackadaisical demeanor and his "too cool for you" attitude rubbed a lot of people the wrong way, more so than his clothes or the way he wore them, I suspect.
Agreed, but, alot of players rub people in the media the wrong way. They're style of clothes and the way they wear them only becomes an issue when it differs from the norm (the typical hockey player). Why is that?

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10-04-2006, 10:37 AM
  #40
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Originally Posted by waffledave View Post
I liked what Jack Todd said..."Mike Ribeiro, who's idea of a hard summer's work is going to power skating lessons 4 times..."
I guess jack todd didn't read that Ribeiro added as much weight as koivu did?

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:38 AM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 417 View Post
Agreed, but, alot of players rub people in the media the wrong way. They're style of clothes and the way they wear them only becomes an issue when it differs from the norm (the typical hockey player). Why is that?
Hey, there's no dress code where I live but you should see the looks I get at Your Independant Grocer when I roam the aisles in a black cocktail dress.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:40 AM
  #42
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Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
Hey, there's no dress code where I live but you should see the looks I get at Your Independant Grocer when I roam the aisles in a black cocktail dress.
lol! classic

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10-04-2006, 10:41 AM
  #43
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Originally Posted by habfan4 View Post
Mike doesn't live in a vacuum, his "image" rightly or wrongly is going to affect how others perceive him. That goes double when we are talking about the hockey press in Montréal.
Society is funny in some ways... If a certain person dresses a certain way, he's a bad person; however, if he wears a nice suit, he's good. Personally, even if I was in the NHL, I wouldn't let it change me. I'd dress the way I've always dressed, and if it got people talking, I couldn't care less.

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10-04-2006, 10:41 AM
  #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 417 View Post
only becomes an issue when it differs from the norm (the typical hockey player). Why is that?
Well alot of good responses so far. If you wish to distinguish between the question of whether something is "right or wrong" and ponder why (irrespective of whether it is right) it is, I would simply suggest that we are social animals and instinctively are warry of things which fall outside the norm. Alot of things boil down to that. It has its pros and cons.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:47 AM
  #45
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Well alot of good responses so far. If you wish to distinguish between the question of whether something is "right or wrong" and ponder why (irrespective of whether it is right) it is, I would simply suggest that we are social animals and instinctively are warry of things which fall outside the norm. Alot of things boil down to that. It has its pros and cons.
Good post.

I'd like to ask though, what is the norm when it comes to clothing?

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10-04-2006, 10:48 AM
  #46
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Originally Posted by znk View Post
Stop lying McPhee.

If it comes from the Internet it's true!
source? or I'm reporting this post to the mods.

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:52 AM
  #47
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Originally Posted by Gros Bill View Post
I figure society has more pressing problems that the alleged ostracisation of a multi-millionaire hockey player who wears his pants too low and his hat at an angle.

Poor Mike. Maybe if he'd put more effort into his training and less into his sartorial "signature", he'd still be here. Maybe he doesn't care. But his lackadaisical demeanor and his "too cool for you" attitude rubbed a lot of people the wrong way, more so than his clothes or the way he wore them, I suspect.
so true...

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Old
10-04-2006, 10:53 AM
  #48
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Originally Posted by 417 View Post
Good post.

I'd like to ask though, what is the norm when it comes to clothing?
There is no "norm" for clothing - there is only what society (or communities) deem appropriate depending on the context.

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10-04-2006, 11:01 AM
  #49
Gros Bill
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There is no "norm" for clothing - there is only what society (or communities) deem appropriate depending on the context.
It also varies greatly with time.

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10-04-2006, 11:01 AM
  #50
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Going back to the original interview with Ribeiro, I've gotta agree with one thing.

The local media, during his breakout season pre-lockout, built him up so much that it turned off a lot of the fans not only here on HfBoards but also on the street.

He never asked for that.

Then, while struggling last season, the local media started by defending him, but when they saw the tide of public opinion go against Ribeiro, they happily joined in the circus. All of a sudden he became Public Enemy #1.

He's absolutely right that a lot of this was a perception issue. I've never seen so many people on this board who are so absolutely sure about his character, his personality, his work ethic being horribly negative, when they're going on second, third and fourth hand reports from other people on this board or some of the media with an axe to grind.

I've never seen one player go from hero to goat so fast. He didn't deserve to be a hero, but don't think he asked for it; it was something that was thrust upon him. And when he was found wanting (hey, he's not the next French Superstar!) he was crucified for it.

Now he leaves with a word of advice not to do the same thing to Latendresse, and he's absolutely right. Again we see superherodom thrust upon a young Quebecois, and if he doesn't live up to it, I'm scared to see what the reaction is going to be.

Talk about eating your young.

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