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Likelihood of Watching Soccer on TV

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Old
06-04-2013, 02:07 AM
  #26
Finnish your Czech
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First, the border towns are well represented.
Second, they may be under represented because maybe they do not get cable, but use rabbit ears to get Mexican stations.
Third, just a guess, but I would think Mexicans may well keep a lower profile on the border due to fears of harassment. From what I've read, being hispanic in that area isn't exactly safe with the "Protect America" mantra.
Why would they keep a low profile if the area is mostly Hispanic? You're definitely not right here...

Anyways, I'd like to see what they measured before giving much thought about this. Either way, you can see the correlation that major urban centers are more likely to watch soccer on TV.

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06-04-2013, 08:52 AM
  #27
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Cool map I thought might be relevant since there is some crossover between hockey and soccer fan demographics (younger, more IT, european) and the interest within Seattle.

http://smartblogs.com/wp-content/upl...ccer-on-TV.jpg
although given the blue dots concentrations around urban areas, I'd say that's the doing of the Hispanic population.

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06-04-2013, 09:39 AM
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it's interesting when you compare it with this article:

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/bein-sp...173000812.html

Quote:
By Zac Wassink | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Thu, May 16, 2013 1:30 PM EDT

COMMENTARY | Back in 1999, TNN (now Spike TV) gave pro wrestling company Extreme Championship Wrestling its first ever national television program. The hope of those running ECW was that the weekly show would help expand the company's brand, so much so that the promotion would one day be able to compete with the country's top-two pro wrestling organizations; World Wrestling Federation (now WWE) and World Championship Wrestling (bought by the WWF in 2001). What it proved to be, however, was a test run and not much more for TNN. The station went on to give the WWF a national TV deal in the fall of 2000 before cutting ties with ECW, and the smaller organization folded the following winter.

We may be on the verge of a soccer-related version of a similar tale.

Major League Soccer and NBC Sports officially became a team at the start of the 2012 MLS regular season. The idea, according to multiple individuals I spoke with at the time, was that the NBC Sports Network, known as "Versus" until it was re-branded on January 1, 2012, would be somewhat of the anti-sports sports network, one that catered to leagues often perceived to be ignored by US TV sports giant ESPN. Both the National Hockey League and MLS were set to be the stars of the new station. It was a deal that meant only good things for everybody involved.

That, unfortunately, isn't the case for MLS as the league approaches the midway point of its three-year deal with NBC. Soccer America reported back on May 7 that MLS matches airing on NBCSN this season have seen a 22-percent decrease in viewers from 2012. That number, 93k per match, looks even smaller when compared with the 392,000 average number of viewers who tuned in to watch NHL regular season games airing on NBC Sports this year.

MLS got some more bad news regarding TV ratings on Wednesday. John Ourand of Sports Business Daily reported via Twitter that the Chicago Fire vs. Philadelphia Union match that aired on NBCSN on May 11 attracted just 51,000 viewers. That match kicked off before the FA Cup Final, which was airing live on FOX in many significant markets, had completed. Ourand also reported that 55,000 viewers tuned into FOX Soccer to watch the replay of the FA Cup Final on that same day.

Despite the lack of viewers, fans and critics have widely praised NBC's coverage of MLS, coverage that routinely includes pregame and postgame shows. Such stellar coverage, not to mention a mammoth amount of money, helped NBC land exclusive US TV rights for the English Premier League beginning next August. That on its own was never any real threat to MLS. The latest that any weekend EPL match ends is around 2:30 pm ET, giving those in charge of North America's top-flight league more than enough available hours to schedule accordingly.

Things got a little dodgy for MLS in April, however, when NBC announced that "over 600 hours of original and weekly (EPL) studio programming" will air on NBCSN during the 2013-14 season. This will include Match of the Day and Match of the Day 2, a re-airing of what is deemed to be that week's top match, Barclays Premier League World, Barclays Premier League Preview Show and Barclays Premier League Review Show. No such MLS-related programs are currently featured on NBC Sports outside of the occasional MLS 36.

"In short," one US TV expert told me during a brief conversation that we had a couple of weeks back, "NBC doesn't at all need MLS come this August. They'll ride it out until the end of the current deal, but I can't see any reason why NBC would re-up with the league (after the 2014 MLS season ends)."

"A live sporting event is more difficult and more expensive to produce than is an in-studio program. If done properly, MOTD and MOTD2 should be able to equal the amount of viewers MLS games airing on NBCSN are attracting." I was also reminded that MLS having a summer schedule won't help their cause in this matter. The Premier League season overlaps with roughly six months of the MLS season (MLS playoffs included). Add another few weeks at least for NHL playoff games that also air on NBC Sports, and you're looking at the station really only "missing" MLS during June, July and the first half of August.

Assuming that MLS and NBC do part ways following the 2014 season, the league may not have a plethora of options moving forward. One company insider told me last week that MLS returning to FOX seems "rather unlikely." For starters, FOX Soccer and FOX Soccer Plus are about to be replaced by national sports station FOX Sports 1 (a FOX Sports 2 may also be unveiled sometime down the road). "The new FOX Sports 1 will have programming that would conflict with an entire MLS season," I was told. Live Major League Baseball games as well as live college basketball and college football games will be featured on that station. FS1 will also show NASCAR and Ultimate Fighting Championship events.

"You also have to remember that the 'MLS on FOX' experiment was one that didn't work out all that well the first time around," the FOX person stated. FOX Soccer was the main cable home for MLS matches up until the end of the 2011 season. FOX also already has the US TV rights for the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cups, meaning that the company would have no extra incentive to bid high in order to complete any MLS deal.

ESPN has the resources and channels to, in theory, give MLS an NBCSN-esque deal. This is especially true on summer Saturdays when European soccer leagues such as the EPL are on break, and MLB games are airing on FOX (and FOX Sports 1 starting in 2014). The problem with this notion is that the ESPN family of networks are all college football all the time on Saturdays beginning in September. Relegating league matches to only NFL Sundays once the NCAA season kicks off would be TV suicide for MLS.

"For MLS on US TV, all roads lead to beIN Sport." It's the message I've repeatedly been told since the EPL on NBC schedule was released. The two affiliates of Al Jazeera Media Networks, beIN Sport and beIN Sport en Español, certainly wouldn't have to worry about losing out on the bid for MLS TV rights to the likes of GolTV, a channel that isn't even available in some large markets (I live outside of NYC and cannot subscribe to GolTV in HD via my television provider). Those two channels could also air different MLS games at the same time on league weekends. This was a frequent practice on the beIN stations during the 2012-13 La Liga, Serie A and Ligue 1 campaigns.

Another plus is that the beIN stations do not, minus some international friendlies or World Cup qualifiers, air ratings-drawing prime time shows on a nightly basis. All live European matches that are shown on the channels are completed before 7 p.m. ET. These gaps in programming leave plenty of room for MLS games and even, if beIN wanted them, weekly MLS-only highlight and preview shows.

MLS moving to beIN may be a cause for concern for some US fans, as the stations are currently only available on a subscription basis (i.e. in an "Ultimate HD" or "Sports Pass/Pack" package). Those in charge at beIN have done well in reaching out to providers from all around the country, and Verizon Fios customers finally obtained access to both channels this spring. One must also remember that beIN has a little under two years from the posting of this piece to get into the position that FOX Soccer currently sits; minus the impending doom, of course.

Plenty can happen between May 2013 and the time when serious negotiations over MLS US TV rights take place. Perhaps NBC will buck the trend, merging the EPL and MLS into the greatest soccer duo in the world today before signing a long-term extension with the US league. What we do know is that we'll get a first look at how NBC Sports handles the matter this coming August.

Until then, what can be done to get a MLS MOTD on NBC?
Throw into the Premiership (#1 soccer league here for white folks) that the Mexican League gets more viewership than both the Premiership and MLS, and what you have is compartmentalization of the soccer fanbase here could actually hurt the game in this country. (Imagine if the NHL competed with two foreign leagues for its domestic fanbase.)

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06-04-2013, 09:47 AM
  #29
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MLS gets pathetic ratings. I wonder why that is. The product isn't that bad.

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06-04-2013, 09:48 AM
  #30
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MLS gets pathetic ratings. I wonder why that is. The product isn't that bad.
Soccer fans that are Eurosnobs.

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06-04-2013, 09:51 AM
  #31
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Soccer fans that are Eurosnobs.
Yeah, I guess the roughly 17,000 people in each market who care about MLS are actually at the games. Eurosnobs irritate me... grrr.

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06-04-2013, 09:53 AM
  #32
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Second, that area of Texas is very poor. Very poor, I bet many households do not have TVs and I don't think there are too many Mexicans in plain sight for fear of dismissal.


?
^^^ may be the most wrong statement I've ever seen on hf

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06-04-2013, 09:58 AM
  #33
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Yeah, I guess the roughly 17,000 people in each market who care about MLS are actually at the games. Eurosnobs irritate me... grrr.


This is the best post I've ever seen on the subject, from a blogger at BigSoccer.

http://www.bigsoccer.com/soccer/dan-...urosnob-scale/

Quote:
In my runaway bestseller, “Let’s Round Up All the Eurosnobs and Harvest Their Internal Organs,” I define the term Eurosnob as follows:

1. a****le
2. d*****bag
3. someone born in the United States to non-soccer fan parents who supports another national team.
4. someone who self-refers as a soccer fan, who lives within an hour’s distance of an MLS team, but never goes to games
5. someone who gives reasons for not supporting the Nats, or their local MLS team, for reasons that, if applied equivalently in Europe, would be instantly seen as front-running glory-hunting.

In my followup bestseller, “Is Killing a Eurosnob Really Murder? Is Eating Their Flesh Really Cannibalism?“, I spell out the Eurosnob Scale. Like the Richter Scale, each number is an order of magnitude.

1. You are a soccer player out of college getting dicked over on contract negotiations, or are a developmental player making less than Freddy Adu’s cats.

Oh, yeah, are you kidding? Screw MLS. Screw it, let it make you breakfast in the morning, promise you’ll call, and spend the rest of the week letting your calls go to voicemail.

2. You used to have an MLS team, but it moved, so you support a European team.

This barely registers as Eurosnobbery, provided you support your local USL side. Fans like this can be released on their own recognizance.

3. You have an MLS team, but it’s the Red Bulls, Galaxy or Chivas USA.

Being lumped into corporate brand extensions like Red Bull or Brand Beckham is sufficiently annoying that it’s understandable if you’d prefer not to deal with it. However, cockamamie marketing has been part of the game for decades now. Did you see Washington Diplomats and Montreal Manic fans ditch their teams when they changed to patriotic marketing? Yes, you did, in countless droves – but that didn’t make it right.

4. You don’t live anywhere near an MLS team.

Now we’re into American spectator sports exceptionalism. Unlike nearly every other nation, the major sports in the US are supported by people who may never see them play live, who live in some cases hundreds or thousands of miles away. The idea that fans form solid, heartfelt bonds with teams based on television broadcasts is heresy in Europe, but that’s the way it is here.

In England, every uncivilized backwater has its own team – usually five or twelve. In America, only the very, very grandest of cities, like Carson or East Rutherford, have what you would call a local choice. Uncivilized backwaters like Atlanta and San Diego have to cheer for distant teams. So hundreds of millions of American sports fans make their formative sports loyalties based on who they saw on television, or who had the best uniforms, or who had the most popular players, back when they were eight years old or so.

So what’s the practical difference, then, between living and dying for the Pittsburgh Steelers, and living and dying for Barcelona, when you’re in Honolulu? Really, only a fan can make the call whether his or her loyalty is legitimate.

Still, referring to “we” and “us” from a hemisphere away is sports-talk radio-worthy, and puts you dangerously close to the next category.

5. You formed your loyalties before or away from MLS.

This topic will get a little more heated as we get closer to August 12. But, let’s face it. You can’t really call Mexican club fans and Mexico national team fans “Eurosnobs.” Well, you can. It’s actually funny when you do. That’s why I do it.

But how can you cheer against the team your dad cheered for? How can you cheer against a team that’s part of your identity?

Did Kasey Keller and Brian McBride stop supporting the US when they moved abroad? No, they didn’t. That’s what loyalty is.

However, while it’s understandable and perhaps laudable, to local fans it comes across as 99 44/100ths pure doucheitude. Los Angeles is the Holy City for this kind of fan behavior, and soccer’s just a teeny part of it. Try watching a Kings game when the Red Wings are in town. Or a Dodgers game when the Cubs visit. Or any Angels game. Even the Lakers get Celtics partisans.

And it isn’t even sports. The only reason you can’t swing a dead cat without hitting ten people going “blah blah New York this blah blah New York that” is because of the unreasonable prices they’re charging for dead cats these days. My God – “I can’t get decent pizza, I can’t get a bagel, the public transportation sucks.” *****, *****, *****. The Mets suck, your pizza is thin and tasteless, and Woody Allen hasn’t made a decent movie in twenty-five years.

I seem to have gone on a tangent. What the hell was this post about again?

Oh, right, Eurosnobs. Next category.

6. Your local MLS team stinks.

That’s different from just “Your local MLS team is the New York Red Bulls.” Okay, the Venn diagram between the two is a pretty large overlap, but it’s not cool to ditch a team because every year they’re abortiotacular. You don’t think there are grand, historic, beloved teams in Europe that have hit a bad patch?

Admittedly, for comedy purposes, “I got tired of watching FC Dallas lose every year, so now I’m a Newcastle fan” is box office gold. But picking a winner that’s safely far away is still picking a winner. In fact, it comes with fewer consequences. In Alabama or New Mexico or wherever, if things go bad you just turn the page or switch the channel. Real Madrid fans in Spain have to deal with the repercussions of Barcelona lording it over them, and vice versa. Manchester United fans in England have to deal with every peak and valley, day in and day out, win or lose, no matter what.

Wait, did I say England? I meant Thailand.

Once you say your loyalty is conditional on results, you stop being a fan and start being a customer.

7. You cheer for a team outside the Premiership, Serie A, or the G-14.

Like the Richter Scale, we’re now around the part of the scale where the smarminess can kill people and damage property. At least when you’re sporting a St. Pauli or Partick Thistle shirt, you can feel good about being outside the machine, and your part in raging against it.

Still, every MLS team is more of a social outsider than every team you can name in Europe, and who on the planet is a bigger underdog than the US national team?

Yes, every MLS team is bankrolled by multimillionaires. Cheering for a soccer team is not the same as cheering for gross domestic product. You may think you’re cool, but you’re still an American soccer fan. A comic book fan who looks down on the X-Men and only reads Neal Gaiman graphic novels is still a comic book fan.

8. You want to watch the highest possible quality of play.

By this logic, if you lived across the street from Ibrox, St. James’ Park, or even La Bombonera, you’d stay home and watch Chelsea on television.

This doesn’t achieve full, 100% family-size, industrial strength douchebaggery because at its core, it’s a seductive complaint. There is a minimum level of quality below which it is unreasonable to ask paying customers to attend. (Amazing how often the Red Bulls come to mind in this conversation. Just saying.) I myself don’t go to UCLA games, and since the Sol came along I don’t go to any WPSL games anymore.

However, I’m still attending actual games. I’m not in some pub putting on a fake accent, pretending they can hear me in Munich.

Unlike for measuring the quality or suckiness of individual teams, rankings and comparisons of different leagues have all the prejudice and rationalization of team support, with none of the benefits. La Liga “fans” need to support both Real Madrid and Barcelona. Premiership “fans” conflate Manchester United, Chelsea and Liverpool. According to Serie A “fans,” Milan and Rome are one big happy family.

This reeking, hideous evil comes from spots being awarded in tournaments according to league and federation play. So, for example, Mexico fans are asked to cheer on the United States for the good of CONCACAF, a request that should rightfully be answered with a hearty “Hi-yo, go ******** yourself.” But it makes no sense in an intercontinental club setting, because MLS doesn’t compete with European leagues. Shunning MLS won’t get your seventh place team in the Europa League, no matter how hard you hate.

This is assuming there’s any merit to the “quality of league” argument to begin with. People say “Premiership,” but they sure as hell don’t mean “Blackburn Rovers” when they say it.

And, as we’ve seen after years of MLS play, and several consecutive World Cup appearances, there is no level of US or MLS quality that will satisfy a Eurosnob. I would say a US World Cup win, per nearly impossible, might do it, but by that time every available seat would be filled with converted mainstream fans. Eurosnobs who judge by quality of league (insert mocking air quotes as you like) will be the last MLS fans, not the next ones.

9. MLS needs to get rid of single entity and the salary cap.

What the hell do you care? You’re watching athletes play soccer, not balance their ********ing checkbooks. What kind of dumbass cheers for a corporate structure? Do you also go to boardrooms and cheer on your favorite vice-presidents in charge of regional marketing?

This line of reasoning was also put forth in such classics as “MLS needs to get rid of the shootout,” “MLS needs to have more traditional team names,” “MLS needs to get rid of the countdown clock” and “MLS needs to have sponsors on the front of the kits.” I’m sure next it will be “MLS needs to play on natural grass” or “MLS needs a single table” or “MLS needs to get rid of playoffs.” These aren’t reasons, these are excuses.

I mean, I guess you can try to convince the schizophrenic that the CIA isn’t really beaming toothpaste commercials into his brain – but isn’t it just easier to find another seat on the bus?

10. MLS fans don’t have the tradition and fan passion they have in Europe.

Oh, okay. So, you’ll just wait around until the rest of us build enough “tradition” and “passion.” When it arrives at a level you feel is sufficient to bless with your presence, then you will come gliding in and take credit.

I got a two-word response to that.



…and the horse you rode in on

11. You think MLS isn’t legitimate without promotion and relegation.

No wonder you’re watching games on television. I’m surprised you’re smart enough to work the remote, let alone find your way to a stadium.

….so, um, yeah. This post was going to be about the attendances for the friendlies in “The Summer of Soccer,” and what it implies for MLS, but it kinda got away from me. I’ll probably get to the Barcelona/Real/Chelsea friendlies in a future post. Or else I’ll save it for my next book, “For ********’s Sake, Eurosnobs! Seriously! I Mean, For ********’s Sake! Christ!“

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06-04-2013, 10:21 AM
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But what if my team is Toronto FC?

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06-04-2013, 10:44 AM
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But what if my team is Toronto FC?
number 6

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06-04-2013, 10:55 AM
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Meh...I know its just a joke, but I don't pay attention to MLS-ophiles.

Lines like this...."Once you say your loyalty is conditional on results, you stop being a fan and start being a customer."



I saw this alot with TFC's "supporters groups" (who are now all but dead thanks to the horrible product). Debates over what makes a "real" fan, etc...To these franchises (an important distinction between European clubs and North American franchises), we are just customers. Anybody who deludes themselves into thinking otherwise is really just a complete sucker whom "their club" will exploit for every last dollar.

Though I will concede that my opinion is tinged by being a Toronto fan (i.e. I view ownership, and specifically MLSE, as being an enemy of the fans). Maybe its different for people in Colorado, or St. Louis, or anywhere else.

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06-04-2013, 10:59 AM
  #37
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it's interesting when you compare it with this article:

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/bein-sp...173000812.html
A lot of flaws in that article... for one thing, the 22% ratings drop was arrived at by comparing last season's season end average (heavily inflated by playoff races and, most crucially, the Olympics) to the ratings through two months of this season. Through the same point last year, ratings are actually completely steady.

It also talks about all sorts of conflicts that really aren't conflicts at all... MLS season runs from April through to October. Whatever conflicts there are with MLB (Fox can show a grand total of two games a week) and college football (I think it's two or three a week there, too) are easily worked around. But more to the point, what the hell does NBCSN think people are going to be watching on their network from early June until the start of the EPL season? We saw during the lockout how abysmal their ratings for studio shows could be with no live sports to prop them up. When Sports Business News or whatever is getting 30,000 viewers a night, you're dying for that live soccer that can be cross promoted with the EPL (considering the best time slot you can ever achieve for an EPL match is 3 pm on a Monday, it might be smart to hedge your bets there... those ratings will top out).

Don't get me wrong, MLS has serious issues... there's almost nothing in the way of a casual fanbase in the cities that have teams, for example, and for the vast majority of soccer fans outside of MLS cities the Chicago Fire are just as distant an entity as Man City, so there's no incentive to watch the crappier one. But the fact that they play in the Summer will keep them alive on TV, probably not with the $50 million that BigSoccer thinks is coming but I doubt it's as dire as Yahoo is making it out to be.

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06-04-2013, 11:07 AM
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This is the best post I've ever seen on the subject, from a blogger at BigSoccer.

http://www.bigsoccer.com/soccer/dan-...urosnob-scale/
Ha, thanks! Dan Loney is always entertaining.

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06-04-2013, 11:09 AM
  #39
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Originally Posted by Pilky01 View Post
Meh...I know its just a joke, but I don't pay attention to MLS-ophiles.

Lines like this...."Once you say your loyalty is conditional on results, you stop being a fan and start being a customer."



I saw this alot with TFC's "supporters groups" (who are now all but dead thanks to the horrible product). Debates over what makes a "real" fan, etc...To these franchises (an important distinction between European clubs and North American franchises), we are just customers. Anybody who deludes themselves into thinking otherwise is really just a complete sucker whom "their club" will exploit for every last dollar.

Though I will concede that my opinion is tinged by being a Toronto fan (i.e. I view ownership, and specifically MLSE, as being an enemy of the fans). Maybe its different for people in Colorado, or St. Louis, or anywhere else.
I feel for TFC fans. I think the team is cursed. They could sign the entire roster of Real Madrid and would still find a way to be the worst team in the league.

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06-04-2013, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Pilky01 View Post
Meh...I know its just a joke, but I don't pay attention to MLS-ophiles.

Lines like this...."Once you say your loyalty is conditional on results, you stop being a fan and start being a customer."



I saw this alot with TFC's "supporters groups" (who are now all but dead thanks to the horrible product). Debates over what makes a "real" fan, etc...To these franchises (an important distinction between European clubs and North American franchises), we are just customers. Anybody who deludes themselves into thinking otherwise is really just a complete sucker whom "their club" will exploit for every last dollar.
Yeah. So what's the difference between cheering for Toronto or cheering for Manchester City? Are you any less of a customer with them?

You know what effing annoys me, there were very few Manchester City fans in the U.S. 5 or so years ago. Now there's a ton of them. Gee, why is that?

There's some fans, the true soccer fans that cheer for clubs overseas, I have no issue with. The ones that annoy me are people that act like being a European soccer fan is "too cool for school" bandwagoning hipsterdom, "I don't cheer a franchise, I cheer for a club built from the community". Yeah, a community you're not a part of and if that club got demoted you'd be gone, burn your scarf, and jump on the next flavor of the month to be Mister Trendy Soccer Fan. European soccer is the Ultimate Hipster Sport in the U.S. and Canada.

(Toronto FC fans were made fun from the start by other MLS fans on BigSoccer because of acting like they were the "real" fans. Read Bill Archer's blog there. He always winds up TFC fans for fun.)


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06-04-2013, 11:18 AM
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I feel for TFC fans. I think the team is cursed. They could sign the entire roster of Real Madrid and would still find a way to be the worst team in the league.
It has gone past the point of "car crash you can't turn away from" and it is now moved into genuine "I feel sorry for players who come here, it isn't right to do that to a person, out of sympathy for all parties involved just put this franchise out of it's misery". I wouldn't even want the team to move because that would be cruel to whatever city it moved to.

For the record, I am a soccer fan who simply does not have a rooting interest (outside of TFC, and the Canadian and Irish national sides). The whole "who should I root for?" questions, invaraiably answered with "find a team that plays a style you like" discussion (which seems to occur alot in hockey and soccer), just doesn't do it for me. I watch the best teams and the biggest games because that is what is entertaining, but as a person who came to the sport (at the professional club level) at about 23 years of age, I found it simply impossible to get passionate about any team that I didn't grow up with.

Unless I live there, I just can't get passionate about a team.


Last edited by Pilky01: 06-04-2013 at 11:42 AM.
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06-04-2013, 11:28 AM
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It has gone past the point of "car crash you can't turn away from" and it is now moved into genuine "I feel sorry for players who come here, it isn't right to do that to a person, out of sympathy for all parties involved just put this franchise out of it's misery". I wouldn't even want the team to move because that would be cruel to whatever city it moved to.
I used to watch MLS but haven't lately after having taken up a new sport, looking at the standings, dear God D.C. has fallen on hard times. 5 points in 13 games. This was once the flagship team of the league, and I know they're nowhere closer on getting their stadium issue resolved.

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06-04-2013, 11:46 AM
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For the record, I am a soccer fan who simply does not have a rooting interest (outside of TFC, and the Canadian and Irish national sides). The whole "who should I root for?" questions, invaraiably answered with "find a team that plays a style you like" discussion (which seems to occur alot in hockey and soccer), just doesn't do it for me. I watch the best teams and the biggest games because that is what is entertaining, but as a person who came to the sport (at the professional club level) at about 23 years of age, I found it simply impossible to get passionate about any team that I didn't grow up with.

Unless I live there, I just can't get passionate about a team.
Funny thing is that I don't even watch the big games. I don't think I've watched a Champions League final in years. I lose interest in the World Cup once the U.S. is eliminated. I'm barely interested in the Euros since Austria never qualifies. I'm way more interested in regular league games of Rapid Vienna than big Champions League games. But I do follow MLS quite closely. I don't really have a team, as I've been in Europe pretty much continuously since 1996. I used to support the Revolution, but since Kraft ran them into the ground I more or less root for the league as a whole.

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06-04-2013, 03:11 PM
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A bit off-topic, but is that all? Wiki says Texas is 38 percent Hispanic and has 36 Representatives. Seems like Latinos are seriously underrepresented.
Don't think one can look at electoral results with a simplistic view like that. Think about it like this - 50% of Texas senators are hispanic, so among senators hispanics are technically quite overrepresented. Statistics can be a funny thing.

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06-04-2013, 03:32 PM
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Don't think one can look at electoral results with a simplistic view like that. Think about it like this - 50% of Texas senators are hispanic, so among senators hispanics are technically quite overrepresented. Statistics can be a funny thing.
Hispanics are barely overrepresented in the Senate and extremely underrepresented in the House, likely as a result of gerrymandering.

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06-04-2013, 03:59 PM
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I know the Seattle area pulls in some good numbers.

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06-05-2013, 10:45 PM
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Can't wait to see USA women's soccer dynasty beat canada again.

I love watching that team.

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06-10-2013, 03:14 PM
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So in the very top north east corner of Alaska they are 'above likely' to watch soccer on tv.

um, Just checked google maps and there are no towns in that area. It is uninhabited.
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Nope:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaktovik,_Alaska

Probably a handful of people in Kaktovik watch soccer (if they even have a way to do so!), thus ensuring a large blue patch in that part of Alaska.
Yeah, the population density (or lack thereof) would make the Alaska color codes "off."

Also, one of my coworkers lived in Alaska for a year. She was warned to stock up on movies/books, because the cable lines could freeze/break in the winter and then they'd have no TV to watch.

People in Alaska are probably more likely to watch ANYTHING than anyone else in the US. And people in Hawaii are probably less likely to watch ANYTHING than the other 48 states.

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