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1957 Sven Tumba - 5 Game Pro Tryout With the Quebec Aces in the QHL

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06-15-2013, 06:48 PM
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Canadiens1958
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1957 Sven Tumba - 5 Game Pro Tryout With the Quebec Aces in the QHL

Prior to the start of the 1957-58 season, the great Swedish International player, Sven Tumba had a 5 game pro tryout as permitted by IIHF rules with the Quebec Aces of the QHL.

Season opener preview:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=1616%2C623221

Game one. Quebec wins 5 - 4, Sven Tumba's line accounts for all the scoring. Tumba registers three assists. Full details, top of page 11, page link could not be embedded:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...rontpage&hl=en

Exhibition game vs the Junior Canadiens, 8-4 win:
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=1091%2C799518

Game two, Chicoutimi wins 2 - 0:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=1307%2C959257

Game three, Shawinigan wins 4 - 1:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...1247%2C1090358

Game four, Royals win 6 - 3 Sven Tumba missed the game with the flu:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...1136%2C1204447

Game five, Quebec wins 3 - 2, Sven Tumba credited with his best game to date, one assist:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...1559%2C1355492

One more game. Contingency plans were made as it seems the Aces did not expect Sven Tumba to turn pro:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...1136%2C1421472

Game six, last game, Quebec wins 8 - 3:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...1345%2C1492061

1957-58 Quebec Aces Stats:

http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/l...003861958.html

Comments and discussion appreciated.

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06-15-2013, 07:57 PM
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Killion
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Interesting. I thought he'd attended the Bruins Training Camp, at least thats what some of the accounts Ive read have said, the first European to have done so and in 57. Perhaps he did, but was then assigned to the Aces huh?... regardless, he returned to Sweden (legally changed his last name to Tumba) where he was quite the multi-sport figure, a Hell of Soccer player & Golfer. Even had his own touring Waterski Show for awhile. Quite the list of accomplishments over his lifetime as an athlete & businessman.

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06-16-2013, 12:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Interesting. I thought he'd attended the Bruins Training Camp, at least thats what some of the accounts Ive read have said, the first European to have done so and in 57. Perhaps he did, but was then assigned to the Aces huh?... regardless, he returned to Sweden (legally changed his last name to Tumba) where he was quite the multi-sport figure, a Hell of Soccer player & Golfer. Even had his own touring Waterski Show for awhile. Quite the list of accomplishments over his lifetime as an athlete & businessman.
He also had his own radioshow, wrote articles, owned horses etc etc the man did everything..

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06-16-2013, 09:52 AM
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His Beardliness*
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And he helped create table hockey.

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06-16-2013, 11:13 AM
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And he helped create table hockey.
What do you mean, "helped to create table hockey"? You mean in Sweden? Something thats grown in popularity in leaps & bounds over there since the 60's? World Tournaments etc? If Im not mistaken is it not the Swedish manufacturers that do indeed make the best games available?... table top hockey in North America goes back to the late 19th century. Ive seen the earliest versions, sort of like a Crokinole Board but with pins for nets, little checkers as players, a marble or puck used, flicked with your finger. Late 40's early 50's the rod games were introduced, originally the players with the exception of the goalie stationary, then the forwards and defenceman movable, flat metal figures. Big trade on ebay for collectors, from 06 teams to parts & accessories etc. The Swedish manufacturers really kicked it up several notches I think in the late 70's or 80's with larger boards, better mechanics, fully dimensional players, the standard now used in Tournaments with hobbyists flocking from all points of the Globe.

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06-16-2013, 01:33 PM
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1957 Exhibition Season

Sven Tumba played a few 1957 pre season games with the AHL Springfield Indians:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...5086%2C5687756

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06-16-2013, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Sven Tumba played a few 1957 pre season games with the AHL Springfield Indians:
No wonder Sven returned to Sweden. Eddie Shore.... see ya. Outta here.

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12-24-2014, 07:59 AM
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I know this is quite an old topic and might not be very much on point, but if Tumba actually went to NA, how would it have affected the amount of scandinavians, and finns, coming over to NA? I don't know too much about his playstyle, but did he play a typical euro-game or was he more in the Salming mold?

I recall that there was a snowball effect from players who left the USSR after the first few (Mikita?) left, or am I completely wrong here?

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12-24-2014, 09:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gudzilla View Post
I recall that there was a snowball effect from players who left the USSR after the first few (Mikita?) left, or am I completely wrong here?
Stan Mikita was born in Czechoslovakia and came to Canada when he was 8 years old in 1948.

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12-24-2014, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by mbhhofr View Post
Stan Mikita was born in Czechoslovakia and came to Canada when he was 8 years old in 1948.
im thinking of the statsny people, im terrible

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12-24-2014, 12:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gudzilla View Post
I know this is quite an old topic and might not be very much on point, but if Tumba actually went to NA, how would it have affected the amount of scandinavians, and finns, coming over to NA? I don't know too much about his playstyle, but did he play a typical euro-game or was he more in the Salming mold?

I recall that there was a snowball effect from players who left the USSR after the first few (Mikita?) left, or am I completely wrong here?
It wouldnt have a large effect on europeans in the NHL. Tumba was the cream of the crop of swedish players. A generational player. Soviet was still soviet, no way NHL would sign players from there or czechoslovakia. Finland didnt have any greats. What we basically would see is some more swedish guy trying out in NHL. Getting death threats from everyone from assistant coaches to fans. Getting killed in the rink by teammates and opponents alike and going back home.

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12-24-2014, 12:38 PM
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I don't know if there was any players between Tumba and Ulf Sterner that would had made the NHL from Sweden. Perhaps it would have improved coaching earlier in Sweden though. At the time it was still thought as being a sellout to play abroad (soccer started doing it only in the early 50's with Nordahl, Green and Liedholm). You were usually expected to stay with the club that "raised you".

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12-27-2014, 11:10 AM
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No Evidence

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobnobs View Post
It wouldnt have a large effect on europeans in the NHL. Tumba was the cream of the crop of swedish players. A generational player. Soviet was still soviet, no way NHL would sign players from there or czechoslovakia. Finland didnt have any greats. What we basically would see is some more swedish guy trying out in NHL. Getting death threats from everyone from assistant coaches to fans. Getting killed in the rink by teammates and opponents alike and going back home.
Research does not show any evidence of this attitude in the QHL towards Sven Tumba. But then again the QSHL was the league that had the Carnegie brothers and McIntyre starring with Sherbrooke in the late 1940s/early 1950s and Montreal in 1946 was very receptive of Jackie Robinson.

Also high school hockey from the 1930s onwards in the Montreal area featured the likes of Richard Lord and other black players.

A few QHL opponents later coached youth hockey in our district and were very positive towards Sven Tumba.

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12-27-2014, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Research does not show any evidence of this attitude in the QHL towards Sven Tumba. But then again the QSHL was the league that had the Carnegie brothers and McIntyre starring with Sherbrooke in the late 1940s/early 1950s and Montreal in 1946 was very receptive of Jackie Robinson.

Also high school hockey from the 1930s onwards in the Montreal area featured the likes of Richard Lord and other black players.

A few QHL opponents later coached youth hockey in our district and were very positive towards Sven Tumba.
I meant the NHL where the mentality were much harsher than the QHL it seems.

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12-27-2014, 12:23 PM
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12-28-2014, 12:15 AM
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Lars-Erik Sjöberg could have made the NHL jump in the 60's. he is also the first euro born and trained player to captain an NHL team.

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01-09-2015, 02:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Research does not show any evidence of this attitude in the QHL towards Sven Tumba. But then again the QSHL was the league that had the Carnegie brothers and McIntyre starring with Sherbrooke in the late 1940s/early 1950s and Montreal in 1946 was very receptive of Jackie Robinson.

Also high school hockey from the 1930s onwards in the Montreal area featured the likes of Richard Lord and other black players.

A few QHL opponents later coached youth hockey in our district and were very positive towards Sven Tumba.
Tumba was the kind of person who was well liked whereever he went. This article talks a bit about his time with the Bruins:

https://translate.google.com/transla...250&edit-text=

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01-09-2015, 03:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Hobnobs View Post
He also had his own radioshow, wrote articles, owned horses etc etc the man did everything..
He was also the first ever guest on the Swedish This Is Your Life (Här är ditt liv) in 1980! I've seen the programme, and one could easily detect that he had some real charisma. IIRC, on the show, Boris and Yevgeny Mayorov talked about him as an opponent and send their regards, via videotape. But his 'hockey life' was really just a part of it all; a true all-around celebrity.

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01-09-2015, 04:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crobro View Post
Lars-Erik Sjöberg could have made the NHL jump in the 60's. he is also the first euro born and trained player to captain an NHL team.
Talent wise, maybe. But I think hindsight has proven that the first Swedish star had to be someone tough like Salming.

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01-09-2015, 12:13 PM
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Talent wise, maybe. But I think hindsight has proven that the first Swedish star had to be someone tough like Salming.
You are probably right about this. If even Tumba, who was 6'2 and Swedish champion in 3-4 different sports, felt the North American game was to physical for him, I doubt many other players would have wanted to make the transition.

I think its important to understand that the difference between North American hockey and European in the 60s-80s wasn't just a matter of the NHL being superior (which it of course was), but also that the games were different. Many Swedes balked at the physical North American game not just because they couldn't hit back, but because hitting was to a large extent considered unsportsmanlike.

The European sports tradition in those days, and the Swedish in particular, was based on the Olympic amateur ideal that you can still find in sports like tennis, golf and cricket, whereas the North American tradition has been professional from the start. The win-at-all-cost attitude of many North American hockey players would have naively been seen as brutish by many Swedes, who were brought up with fairness as their ideal.

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01-09-2015, 06:23 PM
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North American Sports

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve141 View Post
You are probably right about this. If even Tumba, who was 6'2 and Swedish champion in 3-4 different sports, felt the North American game was to physical for him, I doubt many other players would have wanted to make the transition.

I think its important to understand that the difference between North American hockey and European in the 60s-80s wasn't just a matter of the NHL being superior (which it of course was), but also that the games were different. Many Swedes balked at the physical North American game not just because they couldn't hit back, but because hitting was to a large extent considered unsportsmanlike.

The European sports tradition in those days, and the Swedish in particular, was based on the Olympic amateur ideal that you can still find in sports like tennis, golf and cricket, whereas the North American tradition has been professional from the start. The win-at-all-cost attitude of many North American hockey players would have naively been seen as brutish by many Swedes, who were brought up with fairness as their ideal.
North American sports, has a military training tradition going back to the 1830s. Militia, cadets, leadership, teamwork and activities that were part of military training - hand to hand combat - boxing, wrestling,etc,

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01-09-2015, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
North American sports, has a military training tradition going back to the 1830s. Militia, cadets, leadership, teamwork and activities that were part of military training - hand to hand combat - boxing, wrestling,etc,
Oh, for sure, that was sloppy of me. Of course there has always been lots of amateur sports as well in North America. Organised hockey in Canada certainly has amateur roots at the universities. What I meant was that professional sports have been a part of North American sports culture since before the development of organised hockey leagues, whereas professional sports was still pretty exotic to the Soviet, Czech and Swedish hockey players in the 60s.

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03-01-2015, 07:53 PM
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Current research prompts me to bump this thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Interesting. I thought he'd attended the Bruins Training Camp, at least thats what some of the accounts Ive read have said, the first European to have done so and in 57. Perhaps he did, but was then assigned to the Aces huh?
Exactly. He was invited for a try-out at the 1957 training camp of the Boston Bruins. Time-line:

September 15: Training camp opens.
September 16: Johansson suffers a slight fracture of the left wrist in a scrimmage, but continues working out.
September 29: He's assigned to Springfield Indians (AHL) for an exhibition game against the New York Rangers. Scores one goal.
October: Assigned to Quebec Aces (QHL). Plays five games in the QHL for them (Oct 11, 15, 17, 22, 24) and is credited with four assists.
October 24: Try-out is coming to an end. Lynn Patrick (Bruins GM) tries to convince Johansson to sign a pro contract to remain with Quebec. Tumba declines, but asks to practice with the Bruins for a month "to learn the N.H.L. way of hockey." Patrick allows it since he's hoping that Johansson will change his mind. Which does not happen.

Why didn't Johansson make the Bruins?

Quote:
Lynn Patrick:
"He said if he could make the grade in the N.H.L. he'd be glad to play for nothing. But he's too old to be a prospect. What hampers him over here is the rule which permits bodychecking all over the ice. In Europe you can only bodycheck in your own defensive zone. They have the same rule in college hockey in the United States and until the rule is changed I don't think you're going to find any American college player breaking into the N.H.L."
Why didn't Johansson turn pro to play for the Bruins' farm team in Quebec?

Quote:
Lynn Patrick:
"I did everything possible to make Tumba turn pro but he had too much going for him as an amateur hero in Sweden."

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03-01-2015, 08:17 PM
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Why didn't Johansson turn pro to play for the Bruins' farm team in Quebec?
Nice finds there Theo.... and of course just speculating but he probably didnt want to sign in the minors because of socio-economic & cultural reasons reasons, just the general loss of control over his life. Especially at that age. He was a hero at home, good life, multiple interests, perfectly understandable that he made the decision he did really.

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03-09-2015, 10:52 AM
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I guess these are related enough for this thread.

Result from Tumbas visit with Bruins, that same season Lynn Patrick visited WCH tournament in Norway to scout potential Europeans. Particularly Lasse Björn which Tumba had told him about. He also gave few comments about Johansson.

The Montreal Gazette - Feb 18, 1958
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...2899%2C3148938

Quote:
"I was most pleasantly surprised what Johanssen showed in our training camp last summer," Patrick said. "He´s a fine skater and excellent stickhandler.

"But, because he´s one of Sweden´s top scorer and he has some other business going for him, Johanssen does not want to come over here for six months."
After the scouting trip Patrick would have wanted to sign four Russians. Ivan Tregubov, Nikolai Sologubov, Veniamin Alexandrov and Yuri Kopylov. From Björn he said that "He´s a good player, but he´s not ready for Boston" Patrick also predicted that in future these scouring trips are must for all NHL clubs. Same article mentions that Tumba worked as scout for Bruins in Sweden (and maybe some other teams too )

The Montreal Gazette - Mar 10, 1958
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...7284%2C1610372


Last edited by Sanf: 03-09-2015 at 01:31 PM. Reason: I have my own words :)
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