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Quick Drury Curve Question

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Old
10-18-2006, 03:47 PM
  #1
sc37
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Quick Drury Curve Question

Ok, looking to switch from maybe a Lidstrom to a Drury as the Lidstrom is a bit too drastic of a curve I've found out the last couple games. I know they're the same lie, but how much rocker does the Drury have? Pics would be good, as I'm trying to compare.

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10-18-2006, 04:06 PM
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http://www.hockeygiant.com/bladechart.html

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10-18-2006, 04:17 PM
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I had the Drury curve on a stick and it was angled so steeply the puck would just pop up when I tried to make a pass, but it was on sale. The guy in the sports shop wouldn't let me switch blades before buying it so I took it home and tried to straighten it out myself.

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10-18-2006, 04:22 PM
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my favorite blade - the Easton Drury to be exact

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10-18-2006, 04:49 PM
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not as rockered as a sakic. it has a similar rocker to the lidstom, a little rocker but the drury toe is rounded. this gives it a much more rockered feel than the box toed lidstrom. heel curves definitely take a while to adjust to, especially one as open as the drury. they arent for everyone, but if your a heel curve guy the drury is awesome.

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10-18-2006, 05:10 PM
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i just love the drury curve ! it's the one i've been using it for at least five years now. with it, as far as i'm concerned, you could do what you want with the puck. i mean, if you want to shot high, it comes as quick as you want, you just have to adjust for not doing it all the time seriously, it's the best one IMO !

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10-18-2006, 05:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medmed View Post
i just love the drury curve ! it's the one i've been using it for at least five years now. with it, as far as i'm concerned, you could do what you want with the puck. i mean, if you want to shot high, it comes as quick as you want, you just have to adjust for not doing it all the time seriously, it's the best one IMO !
my problem with it was i go to the backhand frequently in tight, and its a pain to do it with drury, imo. not much backhand there, you know? i also found that any quick shot that i couldnt set up for appropriately,or if the puck wasnt sitting flat went too high almost all the time. im sure you get better at it but i missed some big shots in my games with it and just left it alone. i love the way it shoots when i set up for it, though. heel curves really are great shooting curves.

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10-19-2006, 10:07 AM
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That Hockey Giant chart doesn't seem right....don't think the Lidstrom is a mid curve. I love the heel curve, but was hoping for something a little more rounded rather than the bend the Lidstrom has. I love the shot I get off it, but with the bend the shot sorta hooks if I don't hit it right. Figured the Drury was a more gradual heel curve that is open, which I like. And since I hear that the rocker is similar to the Lidstrom, looks like I'll be getting one.

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10-19-2006, 11:52 PM
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The drury has more of a "wedge" then a curve. I go between both the lidstrom and the drury.. right now I've been using the lidstrom more often. The only thing I dont like about the drury curve is I can't stick handle as well as with the lidstrom..

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10-24-2006, 06:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toroytorero View Post
The drury has more of a "wedge" then a curve. I go between both the lidstrom and the drury.. right now I've been using the lidstrom more often. The only thing I dont like about the drury curve is I can't stick handle as well as with the lidstrom..
totally the opposite for me

about stickhandling with heel curve, the Poti one is really good. i once had a Poti curve and loved it but never found it again. It was a Koho blade so i guess they aren't on the market anymore

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02-02-2010, 11:45 AM
  #11
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Retail DRURY Curve and the NHL?!

Rather than create an entirely new topic thread, I'd like to bring this old topic back to life.

It has been well documented that the retail "Drury curve" appears to be the curve of choice for NHLers. My question is, why, what's the fascination? What exactly is it about this curve that draws so many high-end players? Is it a shooter's curve or a playmaker/passer's curve? I've never used it, so I'm curious.

Granted, I'm fully aware that ultimately it is 110% player personal preference and that, in the end, it's "the carpenter, not the tool" but certainly manufacturers create different blade patterns consisting of various combinations of curve location, depth, size, face angle, lie, toe shape, etc. for a reason. So, again, all that said, I'm wondering what combination of pattern specifics (heel curve, slight depth, 1/2", very open face, etc.) make the Drury the curve of choice for so many NHLers?

Additionally, again reiterating the fact that it's "the magician, not the wand", I'd love to know which popular retail patterns are geared more towards shooting, passing, or handling? In example, would a mid curve, slight depth, small curvature, closed face, short blade length really be more beneficial for optimal stickhandling, or is this correlation another "general rule," similar to the stick length should be cut to the chin on skates "rule"?

Look forward to your responses.

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02-05-2010, 03:01 AM
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I used Modano/Forsberg a while and have come back to Drury type curves (I prefer a slightly less wedgy and less open version, p106), my backhand has never been better. My passing has probably suffered a little, but my shooting is probably better overall.

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02-05-2010, 12:43 PM
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Joe Cole
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I am a die hard Lidstrom curve user. I got the Drury curve on sale... and I had a lot of trouble adapting. I never used to have trouble adapting but the Lidstrom has ruined me.

I curved the Drury with a torch to make it more like the Lidstrom... and... the results are ok. The biggest problem I have is keeping my passes from sailing too high, and shoting right of my target ( i am left handed).

Never will I by a stick/flex/curve which is not EXACTLY what I want. I have two Easton ST grips with curves I do not like. Lotsa $$ wasted.

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02-05-2010, 12:50 PM
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I have recently re-introduced myself to this style curve since my hand wrist injury. The difference is that this curve has an open toe vs closed curve (think golf wedge vs banana).

The upside that I can see is that the puck is very easy to lift, and efforts on the quick release can be applied toward shot velocity vs velocity + lift on a smaller closed curve.

The same exact curve in different manufacturers that I found:
Warrior - Kovalev
Bauer - P91A Staal

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02-05-2010, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puck10 View Post
Rather than create an entirely new topic thread, I'd like to bring this old topic back to life.

It has been well documented that the retail "Drury curve" appears to be the curve of choice for NHLers. My question is, why, what's the fascination? What exactly is it about this curve that draws so many high-end players? Is it a shooter's curve or a playmaker/passer's curve? I've never used it, so I'm curious.

Granted, I'm fully aware that ultimately it is 110% player personal preference and that, in the end, it's "the carpenter, not the tool" but certainly manufacturers create different blade patterns consisting of various combinations of curve location, depth, size, face angle, lie, toe shape, etc. for a reason. So, again, all that said, I'm wondering what combination of pattern specifics (heel curve, slight depth, 1/2", very open face, etc.) make the Drury the curve of choice for so many NHLers?

Additionally, again reiterating the fact that it's "the magician, not the wand", I'd love to know which popular retail patterns are geared more towards shooting, passing, or handling? In example, would a mid curve, slight depth, small curvature, closed face, short blade length really be more beneficial for optimal stickhandling, or is this correlation another "general rule," similar to the stick length should be cut to the chin on skates "rule"?

Look forward to your responses.
i think pros like it because of its simple, gets the puck up quick, shoots well but isnt too tough to stickhandle with. with the bend so deep, you have to carry the puck in a shooting position, and when you move the puck back to the forehand you moving into a shooting position every time. as pros have to get off the shot as quick as they can, this allows them to hold the puck in a position where they can pass or shoot from basically the same area. also moving it to the forehand tends to be far out to the forehand it gives and extra foot out that way when your driving wide and helpes you protect it deeper for your body. for the average player who is winning possession on the boards, protecting, and snapping off shots as quick as they can this all adds up.

most elite scorers have liked a bit of a toe, if not a lot - and this doesnt fit the bill that way. i can think of kopitar, im sure there is others but he is the only really dangly passer AND shooter ive seen use this with high success. savard and nylander use something at least similar, but they are possession passers and the deep pocket can help, as well as the straight open blade for passes.

the retail sakic, or bauer 92 seems to be a shooters curve for me. some thing its easier to stickhandle with, others disagree. as youve said, its all preference. anyone can learn to do anything with anything. the lidstrom is a crazy shooting curve - btu stickhandlings rough, at least at first.

some prefer a much straighter blade like the modano/forsberg/zetterberg popular pattern.

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02-05-2010, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Cole View Post
I am a die hard Lidstrom curve user. I got the Drury curve on sale... and I had a lot of trouble adapting. I never used to have trouble adapting but the Lidstrom has ruined me.

I curved the Drury with a torch to make it more like the Lidstrom... and... the results are ok. The biggest problem I have is keeping my passes from sailing too high, and shoting right of my target ( i am left handed).

Never will I by a stick/flex/curve which is not EXACTLY what I want. I have two Easton ST grips with curves I do not like. Lotsa $$ wasted.
Experimenting w/ different blade patterns, through trial and error, can definitely be a frustrating and expensive process. You just never know if you like/dislike the pattern until you get on the ice and try it. Even if you go the 2-piece/wooden replacement blade route, over time, it adds up, and you're left w/ a basement full of "used once" obsolete and unsaleable blades. Better than buying a one-piece and not liking it though! The most economical choice would be to borrow a friend's stick, but in that case, you can't cut it to your preferred length and do you really want to risk breaking his/her stick and being responsible for replacing it?

Once I find my pattern of choice, I'm done.. I'll be sticking with it for the long haul. Trying to stick with either Bauer or Easton since it's less likely they'll be discontinuing and/or changing patterns like some of the other manufacturers have done over the years.

Slightly off-topic, sorry I'm venting today, but the other thing I find extremely frustrating about pattern experimentation is finding your preferred stick length with the particular pattern you're trying. Because of differences in lie, rocker, etc., I find that, again, you just never know until you actually hit the ice and see how it feels.

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02-05-2010, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sc37 View Post
Ok, looking to switch from maybe a Lidstrom to a Drury as the Lidstrom is a bit too drastic of a curve I've found out the last couple games. I know they're the same lie, but how much rocker does the Drury have? Pics would be good, as I'm trying to compare.
Lidstrom is now Getzlaf. The curve is identical to Drury except for toe, which is rounded on Drury and is square on the other. That may effect a rocker at the toe, but heel is unaffected by it.

If you shoot from the heel, you'll love it. Mid blade shooters will hate it. The secret of adjusting to any curve is to place the puck at deepest part of the curve. It is easier said than done for those who have well established shot. Those have to stick to their guns.

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02-05-2010, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puck10 View Post
Rather than create an entirely new topic thread, I'd like to bring this old topic back to life.

It has been well documented that the retail "Drury curve" appears to be the curve of choice for NHLers. My question is, why, what's the fascination? What exactly is it about this curve that draws so many high-end players? Is it a shooter's curve or a playmaker/passer's curve? I've never used it, so I'm curious.

Granted, I'm fully aware that ultimately it is 110% player personal preference and that, in the end, it's "the carpenter, not the tool" but certainly manufacturers create different blade patterns consisting of various combinations of curve location, depth, size, face angle, lie, toe shape, etc. for a reason. So, again, all that said, I'm wondering what combination of pattern specifics (heel curve, slight depth, 1/2", very open face, etc.) make the Drury the curve of choice for so many NHLers?

.
I am sure NHL players can stick-handle the puck w/o the blade using just a shaft. Therefore I would leave stick-handling importance to beer league players.
That leaves passing and shooting for analysis.
Heal curved blade has longer traverse length compared to same overall length mid curve one. That means that on the wrist shot the puck stays on the blade a bit longer. That improves accuracy for both wrist shot and forehand pass, which are in essence the same actions. Saucer passes are "must have" in the advanced player arsenal; they are are much more accurate due to better puck rotation. Big loft hepls there as well.
Except for the heel area the heel curved blade is practically straight or I should say much more straight compared to mid curve blade. That is important for backhand shot.
Big loft on Drury allows for quick release on snap shot. Same can be seen on Sakic curve which is a king of popularity among mid curve blades.
Big loft could be a problem for slap shot, but it is possible to adjust to it by reducing the wrist turn on the take off. NHL level players can do that with ease.

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02-05-2010, 03:08 PM
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The above poster explained it very well and is indeed technically correct. Longer blade contact= harder and more accurate shot, I've read that from uni studies and it was long since taken as hockey wisdom.

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02-05-2010, 03:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puck10 View Post
Experimenting w/ different blade patterns, through trial and error, can definitely be a frustrating and expensive process. You just never know if you like/dislike the pattern until you get on the ice and try it. Even if you go the 2-piece/wooden replacement blade route, over time, it adds up, and you're left w/ a basement full of "used once" obsolete and unsaleable blades. Better than buying a one-piece and not liking it though! The most economical choice would be to borrow a friend's stick, but in that case, you can't cut it to your preferred length and do you really want to risk breaking his/her stick and being responsible for replacing it?

Once I find my pattern of choice, I'm done.. I'll be sticking with it for the long haul. Trying to stick with either Bauer or Easton since it's less likely they'll be discontinuing and/or changing patterns like some of the other manufacturers have done over the years.
.
Ah men.

It's just that urge.... when ... you...see...a..stick..almost...like your...favorite....

...MUST....RESIST....

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02-05-2010, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puck10 View Post
Experimenting w/ different blade patterns, through trial and error, can definitely be a frustrating and expensive process. You just never know if you like/dislike the pattern until you get on the ice and try it. Even if you go the 2-piece/wooden replacement blade route, over time, it adds up, and you're left w/ a basement full of "used once" obsolete and unsaleable blades. Better than buying a one-piece and not liking it though! The most economical choice would be to borrow a friend's stick, but in that case, you can't cut it to your preferred length and do you really want to risk breaking his/her stick and being responsible for replacing it?

Once I find my pattern of choice, I'm done.. I'll be sticking with it for the long haul. Trying to stick with either Bauer or Easton since it's less likely they'll be discontinuing and/or changing patterns like some of the other manufacturers have done over the years.

Slightly off-topic, sorry I'm venting today, but the other thing I find extremely frustrating about pattern experimentation is finding your preferred stick length with the particular pattern you're trying. Because of differences in lie, rocker, etc., I find that, again, you just never know until you actually hit the ice and see how it feels.
Tell me about it. My garage is full of aging sticks. I failed to sell them timely.
I have a news for you. Most players adjust to a curve. Otherwise frustration similar to yours in inevitable. Once you know how to shoot, the only difference is heel or mid. That is because you place the puck on the blade by feel w/o looking. The rest such as curve radius, rocker, let alone toe shape can be adjusted to.

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02-05-2010, 04:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 94now View Post
Lidstrom is now Getzlaf. The curve is identical to Drury except for toe, which is rounded on Drury and is square on the other. That may effect a rocker at the toe, but heel is unaffected by it.

If you shoot from the heel, you'll love it. Mid blade shooters will hate it. The secret of adjusting to any curve is to place the puck at deepest part of the curve. It is easier said than done for those who have well established shot. Those have to stick to their guns.
i dont find the lidstrom/drury to be all that close, not counting the square toe. it seems to sit further out, which to me says its bent a bit more at the heel, and seems to have more curve throughout. i get how its essentially a heel curve, but i think there are differences, and ive never been convinced the lie is the same.

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02-05-2010, 07:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bleedgreen View Post
not as rockered as a sakic. it has a similar rocker to the lidstom, a little rocker but the drury toe is rounded. this gives it a much more rockered feel than the box toed lidstrom. heel curves definitely take a while to adjust to, especially one as open as the drury. they arent for everyone, but if your a heel curve guy the drury is awesome.
I just broke my Lidstrom Harrow blade I have used since last April. It was a sad day this week when it went

I looked online before for an alternative perhaps to try different blades out and the Drury looked good to me.

I liked the square toe on the Lidstrom I had but also like a round toe type.

I might try and get one and try it out so thanks for the info.

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07-08-2010, 11:33 PM
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my problem with it was i go to the backhand frequently in tight, and its a pain to do it with drury, imo. not much backhand there, you know? i also found that any quick shot that i couldnt set up for appropriately,or if the puck wasnt sitting flat went too high almost all the time. im sure you get better at it but i missed some big shots in my games with it and just left it alone. i love the way it shoots when i set up for it, though. heel curves really are great shooting curves.
i just switched to a drury curve from a mid curve (kessel) and love it, i have it on an s17 i automatically had more power on my shot and a quicker release. with this curve i can find the top corners much faster than a mid curve, and there is plenty of backhand with it also

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08-06-2010, 09:55 PM
  #25
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I picked up a Drury blade today and used it in pickup tonight...first time I've used a Drury in a couple years.

Really had fun with it. I sniped a goal top corner with it even though I never had a chance to shoot pucks in warm up. Took a little snapper and got yelled at for taking a "slapshot", which tells me there was good velocity on it since other guys taking snappers and even half slappers apparently didn't get scolded. I had another REALLY nice snipe that hit the knob of the goalie's stick, but it was headed top corner.

I was pretty surprised by the velocity of the wrist shots with this curve...I remember having trouble with them before.

Part of the reason I tried this out again was that I need to force myself to use more snappers and slappers and have a quicker release than I did last year. I play defense and often will get the puck right into the shins of the opponents with a big load up wrister.

I also thought the passing was outstanding with this blade. I hit a guy from with a backhand pass from the circles in our end to the far blue line right on the tape, which doesn't happen as often as I'd like. Lots of crisp passes too, except for one pass which literally went about 20 feet in the air

As for the stickhandling, it was fine. I'm not a big toe drag guy, usually like to do a lot of head and shoulder fakes and make the opposition think I've lost control of the puck and then at the last second take it wide one way or the other. The length of the blade allowed me to deke just fine.

All in all I'm pretty excited with this blade and can't wait to try it again.

Any big time Drury users here and any tips?

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