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20th Anniversary of the 1993-94 NHL Expansion Draft

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06-27-2013, 06:01 PM
  #1
Ziggy Stardust
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20th Anniversary of the 1993-94 NHL Expansion Draft

It was 20 years ago where the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim and the Florida Panthers were finally assembled.



Expansion Draft List:
http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/draft/nhl1993x.html





Both teams came in with very low expectations, but they found success rather quickly as the Panthers would reach the Stanley Cup Finals in their third season in the league, upsetting Mario Lemieux's Penguins on their way there, and the Ducks would draft an NHL superstar with their first draft selection, Paul Kariya, and would soon go out and add Teemu Selanne, making them a legitimate threat in the Western Conference.



At the time, some may have questioned and frowned the league's choices for adding a second team in Florida and in Southern California, but for the most part, I don't think there is any doubt that the Ducks have become a successful franchise. The Panthers have had their ups and downs, but they're on their way up with Huberdeau, Gudbranson and a whole slew of young, promising players leading their future.

http://panthers.nhl.com/club/news.ht...id=DL|FLA|home

Quote:
“Once we got the list of players, there's one thing that hit us right away and it was the factor obviously in bringing Roger in here as coach, was that while there weren't a lot of goal scorers, there wasn't much offense there, there were a lot of very competitive, hard working good defensive type players,” said Torrey. “So that's what we did. We knew were going to get decent goaltending and we knew that the overall defensive abilities of the drafts were so that was a big help.”
Some footage of the Ducks/Panthers from their inaugural season:





Personally, I find it remarkable how quickly both teams were able to find success, considering how bad the three previous expansion teams were in their first couple seasons in the NHL.

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06-27-2013, 06:32 PM
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If I remember right, the lack of success from the earlier expansion entrants caused the league to change the expansion rules for Anaheim and Florida.

Someone else can hopefully fill in those details.

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06-27-2013, 06:34 PM
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Bill Torrey had done it once already.

Brilliant team builder.

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06-27-2013, 06:39 PM
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vadim sharifijanov
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Originally Posted by Taco MacArthur View Post
If I remember right, the lack of success from the earlier expansion entrants caused the league to change the expansion rules for Anaheim and Florida.

Someone else can hopefully fill in those details.
each team could only protect one goalie, so the panthers and ducks got beezer and hebert instead if tge third stringers ottawa and tb got.

i think teams also couldn't protect as many firwards and d as in previous years too, but am not sure of the exact details.

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06-27-2013, 08:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Taco MacArthur View Post
If I remember right, the lack of success from the earlier expansion entrants caused the league to change the expansion rules for Anaheim and Florida.

Someone else can hopefully fill in those details.
San Jose, Tampa, and Ottawa raised holy hell about the goaltending standard in particular. It had been set up so that each team would have to expose a goalie who had played at least 1 game the year prior, which is how guys like Ray Leblanc ended up with an NHL record.

Florida and Anaheim were allowed to select and fill out their rosters, and then expose a set number of players for those three to take. Tampa took Glenn Healy from Anaheim, then traded him to New York. Ottawa took Dennis Vial from Anaheim and kept him. Tampa Bay took Daren Puppa from Florida and kept him. San Jose declined to participate.

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06-27-2013, 08:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Ziggy Stardust View Post
Michael Eisen? Who the **** is Michael Eisen? You mean this guy?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Eisner

Also, that Rangers vs. Lightning contest held in Miami during Tampa Bay's inaugural '92-'93 season was not an exhibition, but rather, a regular season game. I was there. It was one of numerous neutral site games featured during the regular season:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1992%E2...ral-site_games

And Miami not having a rink? Huh? The Miami Arena was in its 5th year of existence at that point (Miami Heat began play in '88-'89)

That is some horrific reporting.

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06-27-2013, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Ruston View Post
Michael Eisen? Who the **** is Michael Eisen? You mean this guy?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Eisner

Also, that Rangers vs. Lightning contest held in Miami during Tampa Bay's inaugural '92-'93 season was not an exhibition, but rather, a regular season game. I was there. It was one of numerous neutral site games that season:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1992%E2...ral-site_games

And Miami not having a rink? Huh? The Miami Arena was in its 5th year of existence at that point (Miami Heat began play in '88-'89)

That is some horrific reporting.
I didn't want to make mention of the terrible mistakes in the video and let you guys enjoy it, haha. Terrible Canadian media with zero fact checking, a pattern of consistency then and now.

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06-27-2013, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by vadim sharifijanov View Post
each team could only protect one goalie, so the panthers and ducks got beezer and hebert instead if tge third stringers ottawa and tb got.
Also, the Islanders had just made a deal with Quebec for Ron Hextall; so their solid 1a/1b tandem of Glenn Healy and Mark Fitzpatrick ended up both being available (Quebec would run with young Stephane Fiset as starter and expose Fitzpatrick).

Definitely some quality goaltending available and gobbled up.

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06-28-2013, 10:20 AM
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Yeah, Florida struck it lucky in getting Vanbiesbrouck. Really helped the team become good rather quickly. Not to derail the thread or anything but if the league expands by the end of this decade I wonder what rules they would use for the expansion draft?

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06-28-2013, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by tony d View Post
Yeah, Florida struck it lucky in getting Vanbiesbrouck. Really helped the team become good rather quickly. Not to derail the thread or anything but if the league expands by the end of this decade I wonder what rules they would use for the expansion draft?
there's a story there too. vancouver obviously had its starter in mclean, and wanted to keep its reliable backup kay whitmore too. so they traded longtime canuck defenseman doug lidster to the rangers for beezer, knowing that he would obviously be the first player picked in the expansion draft. NYR knew they were going to lose beezer anyway, having chosen to stick with richter, and picked up a veteran depth defenseman for nothing really. as i recall, their other young goalie, WHL star/future canuck/future swedish stamp corey hirsch, was ineligible to be plucked in the expansion draft because he was too young or hadn't played in enough games or possibly due to being on a list of protected prospects-- i can't remember the exact details of that. but sadly, lidster ends up winning a cup against us and even played all seven finals games and scored two goals after replacing the late alexander karpovtsev (then a rookie) near the end of the NJ series.

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06-28-2013, 03:50 PM
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I can't find a list of what players were available for the expansion draft in 1994, or the previous expansion drafts, but I think you guys are right in rule changes being made to the protected lists from 1992 to 1994.

San Jose also had a very unique expansion draft in '91 as they had another participant with them in Minnesota. This is how bizarre and confusing the NHL was under the leadership of John Zeigler.

http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/draft/nhl1991x.html
Quote:
The 1991 NHL expansion draft was unusual in that it involved both an expansion team (the San Jose Sharks) and an established NHL team (the Minnesota North Stars). The North Stars negotiated their way into the draft because their owner, George Gund, was making noise about moving the North Stars to San Jose. To placate him, the NHL granted Gund an expansion franchise in San Jose. Gund was allowed to take a number of North Star players with him to seed the franchise. The North Stars would then restock their team via the same expansion draft that San Jose participated in.

The Minnesota North Stars were first allowed to protect 14 skaters and two goaltenders. The San Jose Sharks then selected 14 skaters and two goaltenders from the North Stars reserve player list. Then the remaining players on the North Stars reserve list were divided among the two teams by alternating picks until San Jose had selected 30 players in total.

Next, each NHL team was allowed to protect 16 skaters and two goaltenders, and the Sharks and North Stars alternated selecting players from the NHL reserve lists. Both the Sharks and the North Stars selected 10 players, and once a NHL team lost a player their reserve list was protected against more selections.

Since the North Stars were the beneficiary of the dissolution of the Cleveland Barons in 1978 - Cleveland players were merged into Minnesota - and since Cleveland was the original California Seals franchise, many people consider this draft to be the"un-merger" of the two franchises, giving the San Jose Sharks a claim to the heritage of the original Seals.

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06-28-2013, 04:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziggy Stardust View Post
I can't find a list of what players were available for the expansion draft in 1994, or the previous expansion drafts, but I think you guys are right in rule changes being made to the protected lists from 1992 to 1994.

San Jose also had a very unique expansion draft in '91 as they had another participant with them in Minnesota. This is how bizarre and confusing the NHL was under the leadership of John Zeigler.

http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/draft/nhl1991x.html
I put this together last year for the 1992 expansion draft (Ottawa and Tampa).

http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1197659

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06-28-2013, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Mayor Bee View Post
I put this together last year for the 1992 expansion draft (Ottawa and Tampa).

http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1197659
Thanks! Looking over that list, good lord is it full of muckers and grinders, minor leaguers, over-the-hill veterans, and goons. It sure was slim pickings for the Senators and Lightning.

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06-28-2013, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by tony d View Post
Yeah, Florida struck it lucky in getting Vanbiesbrouck. Really helped the team become good rather quickly. Not to derail the thread or anything but if the league expands by the end of this decade I wonder what rules they would use for the expansion draft?
Quote:
Originally Posted by vadim sharifijanov View Post
there's a story there too. vancouver obviously had its starter in mclean, and wanted to keep its reliable backup kay whitmore too. so they traded longtime canuck defenseman doug lidster to the rangers for beezer, knowing that he would obviously be the first player picked in the expansion draft. NYR knew they were going to lose beezer anyway, having chosen to stick with richter, and picked up a veteran depth defenseman for nothing really. as i recall, their other young goalie, WHL star/future canuck/future swedish stamp corey hirsch, was ineligible to be plucked in the expansion draft because he was too young or hadn't played in enough games or possibly due to being on a list of protected prospects-- i can't remember the exact details of that. but sadly, lidster ends up winning a cup against us and even played all seven finals games and scored two goals after replacing the late alexander karpovtsev (then a rookie) near the end of the NJ series.
The fact that Vanbiesbrouck ended up available in that expansion draft still fascinates me. There's no way it should have happened.

It isn't like he was in a career rut at the time - he was considered one of the top 5-8 goalies in a (now) 26-team league. Several top teams at the time were being let down by rotten goaltending - Detroit (Vanbiesbrouck's hometown team) especially, Washington, Quebec, Philadelphia, and several others. None of those teams made a quality offer.

Instead Vancouver gets him for a song basically to be expansion draft fodder. Mindboggling.

How many Cups does Detroit win if they acquire Vanbiesbrouck in 1993?

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06-28-2013, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by MS View Post
The fact that Vanbiesbrouck ended up available in that expansion draft still fascinates me. There's no way it should have happened.

It isn't like he was in a career rut at the time - he was considered one of the top 5-8 goalies in a (now) 26-team league. Several top teams at the time were being let down by rotten goaltending - Detroit (Vanbiesbrouck's hometown team) especially, Washington, Quebec, Philadelphia, and several others. None of those teams made a quality offer.

Instead Vancouver gets him for a song basically to be expansion draft fodder. Mindboggling.

How many Cups does Detroit win if they acquire Vanbiesbrouck in 1993?
There's three facets to Vanbiesbrouck in the expansion draft.

First is that the Rangers had him and Mike Richter. For three or four years, they ran with this tandem and never made up their minds of who they were going to keep and who to trade. The second part of that is that, during the 1992-93 season especially, they never moved one for what would have undoubtedly been a sizable trade return.

Second is that Vancouver got him for "future considerations". This was understood to be directly tied to what the Canucks actually did with him. Letting him go to Florida cost them Doug Lidster. If they'd kept Vanbiesbrouck, it would have undoubtedly been a much more substantial package. Keep in mind this was under the old CBA, when awarding of players as compensation in free agency was still perfectly fine. A dispute between Vancouver and New York would have ended up on the new commissioner's desk, and who knows how that would have gone.

Third is that several teams had opportunities to get Vanbiesbrouck and apparently weren't offering enough. No one knows what those offers may have been, but it still circles right back around to New York not deciding between him and Richter at an earlier point.

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06-28-2013, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Mayor Bee View Post
There's three facets to Vanbiesbrouck in the expansion draft.

First is that the Rangers had him and Mike Richter. For three or four years, they ran with this tandem and never made up their minds of who they were going to keep and who to trade. The second part of that is that, during the 1992-93 season especially, they never moved one for what would have undoubtedly been a sizable trade return.

Second is that Vancouver got him for "future considerations". This was understood to be directly tied to what the Canucks actually did with him. Letting him go to Florida cost them Doug Lidster. If they'd kept Vanbiesbrouck, it would have undoubtedly been a much more substantial package. Keep in mind this was under the old CBA, when awarding of players as compensation in free agency was still perfectly fine. A dispute between Vancouver and New York would have ended up on the new commissioner's desk, and who knows how that would have gone.

Third is that several teams had opportunities to get Vanbiesbrouck and apparently weren't offering enough. No one knows what those offers may have been, but it still circles right back around to New York not deciding between him and Richter at an earlier point.
I'm aware of all of this and don't disagree with any of it.

The fact remains that it was *insanity* that one of the NHL's best goalies, dead in the prime of his career, was only able to garner a #6-7 defender in his mid-30s.

Presumably, if any team had been willing to offer a #1 pick or any sort of decent roster player, NYR would have jumped at it. Because they basically ended up taking next-to-nothing.

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06-29-2013, 02:35 AM
  #17
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Originally Posted by Ziggy Stardust View Post
I can't find a list of what players were available for the expansion draft in 1994, or the previous expansion drafts, but I think you guys are right in rule changes being made to the protected lists from 1992 to 1994.

San Jose also had a very unique expansion draft in '91 as they had another participant with them in Minnesota. This is how bizarre and confusing the NHL was under the leadership of John Zeigler.

http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/draft/nhl1991x.html
Your quote doesn't quite go into enough detail; the Gunds had not specifially chosen San Jose, but simply "the bay area". There wasn't even a suitable arena in San Jose at the time. It also doesn't mention that the California Seals were at one time called the Oakland Seals, due to their home being in Oakland.

The Sharks, until their arena was built, played in San Francisco's Cow Palace; ironically, the same (much newer - built in 1941) arena was rejected by the NHL as the original home for the California Golden Seals in 1967.

Gordon Gund was a successful banker (much like his father), and George Gund was involved in the film industry and ended up living in San Francisco. The two brothers ended up with minority interests in the Seals. After plans for a new arena in San Francisco failed, the Gunds were able to convince the other owners to move the team to their hometown of Cleveland. They ended up losing considerable amounts of money, and ended up purchasing the equally failing Minnesota North Stars and merging the two franchises together. Obviously there was the later intent to move when the franchise continued to suffer, but the league instead "split" the team as was specified, with Howard Baldwin purchasing the "North Stars" half of the franchise from the Gunds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MS View Post
The fact that Vanbiesbrouck ended up available in that expansion draft still fascinates me. There's no way it should have happened.

It isn't like he was in a career rut at the time - he was considered one of the top 5-8 goalies in a (now) 26-team league. Several top teams at the time were being let down by rotten goaltending - Detroit (Vanbiesbrouck's hometown team) especially, Washington, Quebec, Philadelphia, and several others. None of those teams made a quality offer.

Instead Vancouver gets him for a song basically to be expansion draft fodder. Mindboggling.

How many Cups does Detroit win if they acquire Vanbiesbrouck in 1993?
Probably no more than they did win; Vanbiesbrouck was no better than Vernon at that point in their respective careers, and he was certainly not as good as a peak/prime Osgood.

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06-29-2013, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by MS View Post
I'm aware of all of this and don't disagree with any of it.

The fact remains that it was *insanity* that one of the NHL's best goalies, dead in the prime of his career, was only able to garner a #6-7 defender in his mid-30s.

Presumably, if any team had been willing to offer a #1 pick or any sort of decent roster player, NYR would have jumped at it. Because they basically ended up taking next-to-nothing.
We saw a repeat of the same scenario with New Jersey having both Brodeur and Mike Dunham. The difference was that Brodeur was solidly entrenched as the starter and wasn't going to be overtaken, but the asking price for Dunham was said to be fairly high. New Jersey went to great lengths to keep him from becoming a Group VI free agent, only to lose him for nothing to Nashville.

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06-30-2013, 12:27 AM
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We saw a repeat of the same scenario with New Jersey having both Brodeur and Mike Dunham. The difference was that Brodeur was solidly entrenched as the starter and wasn't going to be overtaken, but the asking price for Dunham was said to be fairly high. New Jersey went to great lengths to keep him from becoming a Group VI free agent, only to lose him for nothing to Nashville.
They were bringing Dunham into games where the Devils were winning just to get him to the threshold. They split one or two shutouts.

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06-30-2013, 12:35 AM
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They were bringing Dunham into games where the Devils were winning just to get him to the threshold. They split one or two shutouts.
Article from 2009 called "Only thing standing between Brodeur and shutout record: Mike Dunham."


Quote:
New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur could have been crowned the NHL shutout king Monday instead of tying Terry Sawchuk's record of 103.

But he was denied a shot at a shutout in the 1996-97 season when backup Mike Dunham was inserted in a Nov. 9, 1996, game for 41 seconds in the third period of a 4-0 win against the New York Islanders. Brodeur had taken a shot off the shoulder before the coaching staff made the move. He has shut out the Islanders 10 times in his career.

Dunham needed to make 25 appearances that season or he would have become an unrestricted free agent on July 1. He appeared in 26 games, but a handful were less than a minute, including one of three seconds.

The Devils held onto Dunham's rights and withstood a players association grievance.

Shared shutouts don't count toward a goaltender's personal statistics, so Brodeur didn't get credit. At the time, he expressed disappointment, saying he didn't ask to be pulled.
http://www.nyiskinny.com/2009/12/onl...odeur-and.html

From a preview of the 1997-98 season:

Quote:
Goaltending was the source of quite a bit of controversy last season in New Jersey. Backup Mike Dunham needed to play in 25 games in order to remain a restricted free agent after the season, otherwise he'd be free to sign with the highest bidder. So in order to get Dunham his required minimum of appearances, coach Jacques Lemaire often pulled Martin Brodeur late in games just so Dunham could mop up the final few seconds. This practice didn't go over well with either netminder, especially after Lemaire yanked Brodeur in the final seconds of a shutout just to weasel Dunham into one more game.

That move cost Brodeur what would have been his 11th shutout of the season and put a severe strain on his relationship with the coach. Dunham wasn't real happy either and filed a grievance with the league following the season, requesting that he be made an unrestricted free agent on the grounds that the Devils didn't act in good faith. However, the league arbitrator sided with the Devils and Dunham remains their property. They still have yet to sign him to a new contract, tho'. And considering how he was treated, Dunham may not be too eager to sign on the dotted line.
http://www.lcshockey.com/issues/78/njd.asp

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06-30-2013, 01:17 AM
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Probably no more than they did win; Vanbiesbrouck was no better than Vernon at that point in their respective careers, and he was certainly not as good as a peak/prime Osgood.
Say what?

1) In the 1994-96 playoffs, Detroit goaltenders had a save % below .900 in all of them.

2) Vanbiesbrouck was definitely better than Vernon at that point of their careers. Like, not even close.

3) Vernon wasn't even there in 1994 when Osgood and Essensa crapped the bed for Detroit.

4) Are you honestly saying that in the 1993-96 period, Chris Osgood was better than John Vanbiesbrouck? Really?

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