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Old
07-13-2013, 09:58 AM
  #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonewolfe2015 View Post
The KHL has a form of RFA too though, so why is that any different than the NHL when it comes to expanding into Europe, curiously? And they have a draft...
There can be differences, maybe. Who knows? The most important thing - KHL can work without draft/RFA. Can NHL?

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07-13-2013, 10:04 AM
  #77
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If raiding other European leagues of top clubs is part of the KHL's strategy, even if the KHL does reach its goals, the entire thing may ultimately be a pyrrhic victory.

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I don't think they'll ever compete. The over-the-hill Euros, failed NHLers, and the odd Ruski
It's more than the odd 'Ruski'... It looks like it is at least half of them.

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Originally Posted by GordieHoweHatTrick View Post
is welcome to go chasing money in Russia if the people in charge over there continue to pay over market value.
What exactly is 'over market value'. If players of a similar caliber start getting contracts worth a similar amount of money doesn't the value of those contracts become the 'new market value'?

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Originally Posted by GordieHoweHatTrick View Post
I wonder how much Dynamo Moscow is paying Leo Komarov to be their goal-scorer in the inferior league they have over there. Komarov is a prototypical bottom-6 forward worth between 1 and 1.5M by NHL standards, in Russia he's a goal-scorer getting paid probably 3 or 4 times more by Dynamo Moscow,
His career high for goals in the KHL is 14. He is hardly a goal scorer. So if Dynamo is crazy enough to be paying him $4.5-6 million a year it isn't hard to see why the Leafs lost a useful player. Your rant isn't exactly well thought out or packed with facts though so I am skeptical that he is actually making that much.

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Originally Posted by GordieHoweHatTrick View Post
a team that had to merge with another because their rich owner didn't feel like paying the bills anymore. The team they merged with was owned by the Ministry of Internal Affairs, does that mean part of the funding was coming out of public dollars just so they could have a hockey team where they pay $10 to attend? The KHL is a joke, more like that pesky mosquito buzzing around you than any real threat.
I believe the NHL refers to this as the 'Phoenix Coyotes model' of club ownership.

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07-13-2013, 10:17 AM
  #78
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Originally Posted by CoolForumNamePending View Post
If raiding other European leagues of top clubs is part of the KHL's strategy, even if the KHL does reach its goals, the entire thing may ultimately be a pyrrhic victory.
Can you explain this? I have some idea, but want to hear your arguments as well.

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07-13-2013, 10:27 AM
  #79
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Originally Posted by JuniorNelson View Post
The NHL is a money grubbing outfit. This guarantees, in my estimation, that the European division is just a matter of time. Even the briefest corporate glance would reveal significant markets being left untapped.

I am not kidding when I say the dynamic leadership is coming from Russia. The KHL has expanded into other countries, a sure sign of global awareness. Simply put, there are markets as large as the current market simply laying around in Europe, waiting for someone to understand the potential.

In the future when we look back, we will see that the only barrier is understanding. All the logistical concerns can be comfortably arranged. The money generated by the Russian, Swedish, Czech and German markets will be such that travel cost will be insignificant.

The NHL would have to go to a lighter, Euro-style sixty game schedule, but could easily add ten teams. Simplify the playoffs (four division winners play to advance to the final) and you are good to go.
The KHL also had an entire team die because management was too cheap to upgrade their poverty airplane.

Also Alexei Cherepanov.

The KHL is a gongshow and almost any North American that goes over there echoes that sentiment.

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07-13-2013, 10:36 AM
  #80
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The KHL is able to attract so many European and Russian players because they overpay a lot for their services. Part of that is due to poor club management though.

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07-13-2013, 10:40 AM
  #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonewolfe2015 View Post
The KHL has a form of RFA too though, so why is that any different than the NHL when it comes to expanding into Europe, curiously? And they have a draft...
I'd guess that the KHL is gambling on the hope that none of the players on their EU-based teams will challenge the draft or restricted free agency. Anyway, as vorky pointed out the draft and restricted free agency aren't fundamental to the way the KHL operates in the same way that they are for the NHL. The KHL draft is really only a compliment to the traditional hockey school-based developmental system.

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07-13-2013, 10:49 AM
  #82
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Originally Posted by Franck View Post
I'd guess that the KHL is gambling on the hope that none of the players on their EU-based teams will challenge the draft or restricted free agency. Anyway, as vorky pointed out the draft and restricted free agency aren't fundamental to the way the KHL operates in the same way that they are for the NHL. The KHL draft is really only a compliment to the traditional hockey school-based developmental system.
Thx for support. Btw, basketball league in Spain has RFA system and it works within EU. Is this system ok with EU law? Or no player has gone to court yet? Dont know. IMO draft is against EU law, RFA does not have to be.

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07-13-2013, 10:53 AM
  #83
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Originally Posted by hohosaregood View Post
I wonder if they winner of the Gagarin Cup will ever ask to compete for the Stanley Cup.
That I would love to see (even other leagues challenging). It would never happen, but it would be cool to see it go back to a challenge Cup. Make a new trophy for the NHL, let them hold it first, and then defend it from other leagues.

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07-13-2013, 11:01 AM
  #84
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Originally Posted by vorky View Post
Thx for support. Btw, basketball league in Spain has RFA system and it works within EU. Is this system ok with EU law? Or no player has gone to court yet? Dont know. IMO draft is against EU law, RFA does not have to be.
I don't believe it has been taken to court yet. Ultimately, a League would argue that a RFA has a right to sign with whomever he chooses, so it is legal. The player would argue that the associated cost of signing a RFA to a contract hurts his market value.

He doesn't have a contract and the rules hurt his market value; I can't imagine the European courts not siding with the player if it was ever challenged.

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07-13-2013, 11:09 AM
  #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franck View Post
I'd guess that the KHL is gambling on the hope that none of the players on their EU-based teams will challenge the draft or restricted free agency. Anyway, as vorky pointed out the draft and restricted free agency aren't fundamental to the way the KHL operates in the same way that they are for the NHL. The KHL draft is really only a compliment to the traditional hockey school-based developmental system.
Fair enough, I already understand the NHL expanding to Europe wouldn't be viable on a number of levels, of which the trading system is a huge component. Can't have players being traded from California to Slovakia, a lot of players would not like that (and vice versa from Europe to US or Canada). The draft system would have to be replaced by two different regional drafts at best and games would be difficult to schedule due to viewership and travel.

I just was curious why you alluded to that being the main reason the NHL couldn't handle it.

As far as I'm concerned, the KHL moving into Europe is no big deal. SHL and FEL will remain big in Scandinavian countries and I feel pretty confident that the improvements in the US developmental system will fill in some of the loss of Euro players. Some will still move to the NHL since it will remain the biggest league. But if the KHL did expand well enough, there would be the potential for a new 'Super Series' of sorts which would be very entertaining.

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07-13-2013, 11:18 AM
  #86
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Originally Posted by DrinkFightFlyers View Post
That I would love to see (even other leagues challenging). It would never happen, but it would be cool to see it go back to a challenge Cup. Make a new trophy for the NHL, let them hold it first, and then defend it from other leagues.
First: I don't actually know about basketball in Spain, but a lot of European leagues have mandatory compensation rules for development of youth players, so as long as they do not actually impede the right to free movement of persons in the EU, some rules and aspects that are similar to American RFA rules could well hold up.

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07-13-2013, 11:35 AM
  #87
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Originally Posted by Alklha View Post
The KHL set-up has just become problematic. If it wants to be a proper European League then it needs half the teams from the former Soviet countries and the other half from other European countries. Difficult to be seen as a real alternative for European players with a few token spots open to other nations teams. If it isn't set on becoming a real European League, then it will never compete.

It might start to keep more top Russians over the next decade or so, but I don't see it happening with other Euros unless there is a proper restructuring.
Problematic? How so?

Last time I checked, the KHL has already absorbed teams from other leagues. Czech? Slovakia? Croatia?

The Croatian team is one of Europe's most popular teams.

They have also been trying to bring in team's from italy and since 2009 the KHL has been trying to transform into the United Hockey Europe.

Open your eyes beyond the walls of the North American leagues. You might be surprised and learn a thing or two

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07-13-2013, 11:40 AM
  #88
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The actual concept of a European League (such as the KHL) does not bother me at all and is only good for the game. However I will provide this stark warning on what could damage the sport.

The biggest problem in my mind with European Football is the no-cap, no responsibility, high rolling Billionaires and Squillionaires buying teams and throwing money at players to sit on the bench upwards of 100,000 a week which is a yearly salary of 36,000,000. You think the NHL players are overpaid...

But anyway, the point is that whilst its great to see all these flourishing leagues the only real "competitive" competition is that of the Champions League. Sure there are 4/5 teams potentially capable of winning the EPL, 2 in the Spanish La Liga, 3 or so in the Bundesliga or 3 or so in the Serie A. But thats almost 80% of each league with absolutely no chance of winning the domestic title because they can not hope to compete with the Russian/Eastern European Oligarchs, US Billionaires or Middle Eastern Royal Families that are literally throwing money at players for fun. I'm not saying more money in the sport is a bad thing per se, but in terms of competition it is literally ruining the sport to a select few. The last EPL champion not in the big 4 or 5 was Blackburn Rovers in the 1990s, and they've since been relegated.

My point is between the NHL & KHL is that one has a salary cap designed for parity (and in fact I believe most NA Leagues have this, along with the draft) which, whilst not always perfect, does give some degree of competition for all the teams involved. Sure it doesn't mean the Avs are going to win the Stanley Cup, but then consider the Kings at the 8th Seed winning the SC. It can and does happen because there is a degree of parity. It never happens in leagues without that cap.

This is where the KHL could potentially ruin the sport. Its all well and good now saying "yeah its a farce over there", but as soon as those billionaires decide "I want big stadium, best players, best organisation" they will throw unlimited amounts of resources at it. Considering the KHL is actively promoting the idea of a players' union the stories of self-bought equipment, threats, plane standards will begin to rise considerably. Suddenly you'll have one league that could afford to pay someone like Crosby Triple the amount he's making in Pittsburgh. Sure he probably wouldn't take it but in the future if you can buy them over young, to a league where standards in player care are rising, facilities that start to become on par with AHL/NHL Standards then legitamately the league is in trouble. Why? Because the cap will do that to them. The problem in my mind is that cap is one of the best things about NA Sports, along with the draft, but will it be able to compete 10/20 years down the line?

Personally, the IIHF has a responsibility here to do something no other international organisation has the balls to do. Set a requirement for every league in the world to have cap not exceeding set dollar amount, perhaps using the NHL as the going rate. This would stop the quite frankly ludicrous contracts the KHL can throw around to youngsters but also benefit their system as well by providing both financial feasability and giving the smaller teams in that league an actual chance to compete. Wether it would stop Russians not coming over is irrelevant, I don't think it matters really, but it would stop the potential for the KHL to simply out bid the NHL, which it may now seem not an issue, but it will do down the line.

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07-13-2013, 12:03 PM
  #89
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It's pretty comparable. People keep saying "no North American star will go there" but forget at the time only North Americans played in the NHL and lots if high end talent did leave for the WHA. The Winnipeg Jets of the WHA were the first North American pro hockey team to seriously use Europe as a talent pool. As long as high end talent leaves to play there it is a very comparable situation.

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07-13-2013, 12:07 PM
  #90
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Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
The KHL is able to attract so many European and Russian players because they overpay a lot for their services. Part of that is due to poor club management though.
But really, what is overpayment? If someone is willing to pay more to sign a certain player, that's what his peak value is. If a team needs to pay more than some other team to sign that player, then that's what's going to happen. I wouldn't call it "overpayment".

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07-13-2013, 12:15 PM
  #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatBritishStarsFan View Post
The actual concept of a European League (such as the KHL) does not bother me at all and is only good for the game. However I will provide this stark warning on what could damage the sport.

The biggest problem in my mind with European Football is the no-cap, no responsibility, high rolling Billionaires and Squillionaires buying teams and throwing money at players to sit on the bench upwards of 100,000 a week which is a yearly salary of 36,000,000. You think the NHL players are overpaid...

But anyway, the point is that whilst its great to see all these flourishing leagues the only real "competitive" competition is that of the Champions League. Sure there are 4/5 teams potentially capable of winning the EPL, 2 in the Spanish La Liga, 3 or so in the Bundesliga or 3 or so in the Serie A. But thats almost 80% of each league with absolutely no chance of winning the domestic title because they can not hope to compete with the Russian/Eastern European Oligarchs, US Billionaires or Middle Eastern Royal Families that are literally throwing money at players for fun. I'm not saying more money in the sport is a bad thing per se, but in terms of competition it is literally ruining the sport to a select few. The last EPL champion not in the big 4 or 5 was Blackburn Rovers in the 1990s, and they've since been relegated.

My point is between the NHL & KHL is that one has a salary cap designed for parity (and in fact I believe most NA Leagues have this, along with the draft) which, whilst not always perfect, does give some degree of competition for all the teams involved. Sure it doesn't mean the Avs are going to win the Stanley Cup, but then consider the Kings at the 8th Seed winning the SC. It can and does happen because there is a degree of parity. It never happens in leagues without that cap.

This is where the KHL could potentially ruin the sport. Its all well and good now saying "yeah its a farce over there", but as soon as those billionaires decide "I want big stadium, best players, best organisation" they will throw unlimited amounts of resources at it. Considering the KHL is actively promoting the idea of a players' union the stories of self-bought equipment, threats, plane standards will begin to rise considerably. Suddenly you'll have one league that could afford to pay someone like Crosby Triple the amount he's making in Pittsburgh. Sure he probably wouldn't take it but in the future if you can buy them over young, to a league where standards in player care are rising, facilities that start to become on par with AHL/NHL Standards then legitamately the league is in trouble. Why? Because the cap will do that to them. The problem in my mind is that cap is one of the best things about NA Sports, along with the draft, but will it be able to compete 10/20 years down the line?

Personally, the IIHF has a responsibility here to do something no other international organisation has the balls to do. Set a requirement for every league in the world to have cap not exceeding set dollar amount, perhaps using the NHL as the going rate. This would stop the quite frankly ludicrous contracts the KHL can throw around to youngsters but also benefit their system as well by providing both financial feasability and giving the smaller teams in that league an actual chance to compete. Wether it would stop Russians not coming over is irrelevant, I don't think it matters really, but it would stop the potential for the KHL to simply out bid the NHL, which it may now seem not an issue, but it will do down the line.
I agree more or less, I disagree with bold part.

IIHF has much bigger problems than salary cap. Btw, KHL has salary cap (dont believe rumours about players outside cap, it was reality in KHL, but is not anymore). IIHF has much bigger problems:

1) no development fees in hockey (why should rich clubs from NHL/KHL take best Euros/Americans for free?)

2) no transfer fees if Euros go to NHL (this NHLTPA is not transfer fee nor development fee), NHL does not respect euro contracts of players.

These 2 problems should be solved by IIHF, salary cap can be next thing but not before those I mentioned.

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07-13-2013, 12:32 PM
  #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatBritishStarsFan View Post
The actual concept of a European League (such as the KHL) does not bother me at all and is only good for the game. However I will provide this stark warning on what could damage the sport.

The biggest problem in my mind with European Football is the no-cap, no responsibility, high rolling Billionaires and Squillionaires buying teams and throwing money at players to sit on the bench upwards of 100,000 a week which is a yearly salary of 36,000,000. You think the NHL players are overpaid...

But anyway, the point is that whilst its great to see all these flourishing leagues the only real "competitive" competition is that of the Champions League. Sure there are 4/5 teams potentially capable of winning the EPL, 2 in the Spanish La Liga, 3 or so in the Bundesliga or 3 or so in the Serie A. But thats almost 80% of each league with absolutely no chance of winning the domestic title because they can not hope to compete with the Russian/Eastern European Oligarchs, US Billionaires or Middle Eastern Royal Families that are literally throwing money at players for fun. I'm not saying more money in the sport is a bad thing per se, but in terms of competition it is literally ruining the sport to a select few. The last EPL champion not in the big 4 or 5 was Blackburn Rovers in the 1990s, and they've since been relegated.

My point is between the NHL & KHL is that one has a salary cap designed for parity (and in fact I believe most NA Leagues have this, along with the draft) which, whilst not always perfect, does give some degree of competition for all the teams involved. Sure it doesn't mean the Avs are going to win the Stanley Cup, but then consider the Kings at the 8th Seed winning the SC. It can and does happen because there is a degree of parity. It never happens in leagues without that cap.

This is where the KHL could potentially ruin the sport. Its all well and good now saying "yeah its a farce over there", but as soon as those billionaires decide "I want big stadium, best players, best organisation" they will throw unlimited amounts of resources at it. Considering the KHL is actively promoting the idea of a players' union the stories of self-bought equipment, threats, plane standards will begin to rise considerably. Suddenly you'll have one league that could afford to pay someone like Crosby Triple the amount he's making in Pittsburgh. Sure he probably wouldn't take it but in the future if you can buy them over young, to a league where standards in player care are rising, facilities that start to become on par with AHL/NHL Standards then legitamately the league is in trouble. Why? Because the cap will do that to them. The problem in my mind is that cap is one of the best things about NA Sports, along with the draft, but will it be able to compete 10/20 years down the line?

Personally, the IIHF has a responsibility here to do something no other international organisation has the balls to do. Set a requirement for every league in the world to have cap not exceeding set dollar amount, perhaps using the NHL as the going rate. This would stop the quite frankly ludicrous contracts the KHL can throw around to youngsters but also benefit their system as well by providing both financial feasability and giving the smaller teams in that league an actual chance to compete. Wether it would stop Russians not coming over is irrelevant, I don't think it matters really, but it would stop the potential for the KHL to simply out bid the NHL, which it may now seem not an issue, but it will do down the line.
I'm pretty sure the world is OK with a few teams dominating football. It hasn't exactly damaged the sport's popularity by any stretch of imagination.

As a matter of fact, if a sport is trying to appeal to a global audience, it's a good thing if there are only a few teams who can compete year in and out. It makes overseas fandom a lot easier to get organized and develop rivalries in these places as well - case in point, Real vs Barcelona; Bayern M. vs Borussia; EPL's Big 4, etc.

Keep in mind North American sports fans emphasize parity because the North American major leagues' model of one competition, one cup means every team's objective is to make it to the playoffs and win the Cup, period. There are no single-game elimination tournaments. There are no regional competitions. There are no trophies for every professional team in the sport to compete in. There is no inter-league play. It's all about the NHL, MLB, NFL and NBA regular season and playoffs, that's it.

It doesn't work that way elsewhere in the world. If a team doesn't win the EPL, it's OK - there's the Champions/Euro League. The FA Cup. The Football League Cup. The Football League Trophy. Fighting against relegation is a battle in itself. Other teams can cherish promotions. In other countries, you have prestigious state and regional competitions on top of cups. Even if the team doesn't win anything meaningful, the history and traditions of sports clubs mean beating the **** out of rivals can make an otherwise bland season great. There are so many battles to be won, it isn't as big of a deal if a club can't hang with the billionaires.

The IIHF would be stupid to institute a worldwide cap. Russian billionaires ponying up for superstars means NHL owners would have to do the same and force them to eliminate the NHL cap, and more money would go into the sport.

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07-13-2013, 12:33 PM
  #93
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The KHL has significantly more resources than the WHA ever did, doesn't care about losing moderate amounts of money, and is much more organized.

Of course, not that many Russians are coming to the NHL in the first place. Of the top 500 players in the NHL in points this year, 20 were Russian. That's right at 4%, fifth-largest by volume in the NHL, and that number has been in decline since before the turn of the century. In 1999-2000, it was 68. It was 44 in 2005-06. I suspect - though I have no evidence to confirm this - the decline is the result of the retirement of Soviet-era players who were eager to come across the pond, and also the growth of the American talent pool pushing lower-level European players back overseas. Oleg Petrov probably wouldn't have a roster spot in the NHL today, for example.

Only tie will tell if I think the really high-end players will continue to come over at least for parts of their careers - Kovalchuk played 12 years here, remember - but the guys who would be third or fourth line players in the NHL will probably stay home, be impact players and get much more money than they would here. The same will apply to most mid-level guys in places like Finland, Belarus, and Slovakia. They'll grab a few North American guys like Dustin Boyd, Kevin Dallman, and Nigel Dawes, who couldn't quite stay afloat in the NHL. Are they a threat to the NHL, though? I guess it depends on how you define threat, but no, I don't think so. I think the best players in Europe will continue to come to North America to test themselves, and the best young players in the Czech Republic and Slovakia will follow guys like Voracek into the CHL because the youth systems in those countries are complete disasters.

Now, that could change quickly and dramatically if the NHL decides not to participate in the Olympics. Europeans would leave in droves.

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07-13-2013, 12:38 PM
  #94
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I agree more or less, I disagree with bold part.

IIHF has much bigger problems than salary cap. Btw, KHL has salary cap (dont believe rumours about players outside cap, it was reality in KHL, but is not anymore). IIHF has much bigger problems:

1) no development fees in hockey (why should rich clubs from NHL/KHL take best Euros/Americans for free?)

2) no transfer fees if Euros go to NHL (this NHLTPA is not transfer fee nor development fee), NHL does not respect euro contracts of players.

These 2 problems should be solved by IIHF, salary cap can be next thing but not before those I mentioned.
1) NHL teams do not have Under-20 sides etc. In fact all they do is acquire the rights to youngsters. This is more of an issue between organisations like the CHL, OHL etc. and other juniour hockey systems. This does not relate to the above argument as much as you may think. The only way I can see this being an issue is for 18/19 year olds coming to the AHL feeder teams but that is not a development fee issue thats a transfer fee issue and as in point 2 respect of contract issue. If you're to have development fees then surely it makes more sense for NHL sides to have European Affiliates, otherwise you'd be throwing money at all sorts of different teams at a "chance" they may become NHL ready which makes no business sense. You may as well roll the transfer/development fee into one.

2) I do agree with this though. Having said that if a player wants to leave they're should be compensation, perhaps twice the salary remaining on their European contract. Having said that I don't believe the KHL for one minute respected the agreement in the Kovalchuk case, but thats a different issue.

Maybe the KHL does have a salary cap, but can any NHL team throw millions at a prospect? No they can't due to ELCs and that's another area where I can see the NHL and other leagues being out bid.

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07-13-2013, 12:41 PM
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Playing outdoors in Pula. Developing into the top 15 popular team in Europe.
That game in Pula was AMAZING. To hell with the "Heritage Classic" - this was played in a 2000 year old Roman amphitheatre where the players literally came out of the dressing rooms through gladiator tunnels.

AWESOME!

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07-13-2013, 12:44 PM
  #96
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I'm pretty sure the world is OK with a few teams dominating football.
Not really. Various translations of "No al calcio moderno" (No to modern football) is the most common message found on banners at matches across Europe, there are many voices across the continent calling for a salary cap and the coming financial fair play regulations are at least in part intended to level the playing field somewhat.

You will find very few football fans who actively support the status quo.

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07-13-2013, 12:44 PM
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Sure there are 4/5 teams potentially capable of winning the EPL, 2 in the Spanish La Liga, 3 or so in the Bundesliga or 3 or so in the Serie A. But thats almost 80% of each league with absolutely no chance of winning the domestic title...
It doesn't matter. All those leagues are feeder leagues to the Champions League. And it's in the Champions League where in any given year you'll find a dozen+ teams capable of winning it all.

It's a different model, one that allows layers of success, and each team/fanbase finds the layer it's most capable of competing in.

The alternative is to formalize a Euro-wide league where England (for example) would only have 3-4 teams.

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07-13-2013, 12:54 PM
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Zherdev just had his contract canceled against his will. I'm thinking this type of thing will be a big obstacle toward creating the sort of good faith that would attract players who aren't otherwise viewing the KHL as their "first" choice anyway.

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07-13-2013, 12:57 PM
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I'm pretty sure the world is OK with a few teams dominating football. It hasn't exactly damaged the sport's popularity by any stretch of imagination.

As a matter of fact, if a sport is trying to appeal to a global audience, it's a good thing if there are only a few teams who can compete year in and out. It makes overseas fandom a lot easier to get organized and develop rivalries in these places as well - case in point, Real vs Barcelona; Bayern M. vs Borussia; EPL's Big 4, etc.

Keep in mind North American sports fans emphasize parity because the North American major leagues' model of one competition, one cup means every team's objective is to make it to the playoffs and win the Cup, period. There are no single-game elimination tournaments. There are no regional competitions. There are no trophies for every professional team in the sport to compete in. There is no inter-league play. It's all about the NHL, MLB, NFL and NBA regular season and playoffs, that's it.

It doesn't work that way elsewhere in the world. If a team doesn't win the EPL, it's OK - there's the Champions/Euro League. The FA Cup. The Football League Cup. The Football League Trophy. Fighting against relegation is a battle in itself. Other teams can cherish promotions. In other countries, you have prestigious state and regional competitions on top of cups. Even if the team doesn't win anything meaningful, the history and traditions of sports clubs mean beating the **** out of rivals can make an otherwise bland season great. There are so many battles to be won, it isn't as big of a deal if a club can't hang with the billionaires.

The IIHF would be stupid to institute a worldwide cap. Russian billionaires ponying up for superstars means NHL owners would have to do the same and force them to eliminate the NHL cap, and more money would go into the sport.
It's an abosolutely massive issue if teams can't hang with the billionaires. Put into perspective the gap between The Premiership and The Championship is getting larger, meaning those smaller teams have to make bigger financial sacrifices to attempt to survive and thats without any guarantee it will work. And then there's a huge gap between the rest and the Top 4. To say that no one cares about that is ridiculous. The last team to break into that select group was Manchester City. How did they do it? Something about the Saudi Royal Family getting involved. I'm a fan of Portsmouth FC, a team that were doing so well but financially completely unsustainable without the riches of a foreign owner. Owner in prison, bam 5 years later we're in League 2 four division below where we once were, all because we were chasing and attempting to compete with the top teams. It is a complete fallacy to suggest that other teams don't care, they do and often bemoan the power these teams have. What I'm trying to get at here is the dangers of irresponsible foreign investment (okay Paul Holmgren hasn't exactly been a beacon of fiscal perfection) and how in a lot of ways it destroys what in a lot of ways sport is all about.

My concern for the NHL is that it will not be able to compete with the KHL in the future when it comes to financial resources. It doesn't look bad now, but give it a decade, maybe two and then there will be genuine problems. Again I don't mind the KHL being a great league and would hope the two leagues could come up with a world series or something like that but what I don't want to see is the soul of the sport ripped out to the highest bidder. I've seen it happen first hand and it is honestly awful. The only competitions that actually matter are the domestic league title and the Champions League, you don't really care about the cups until the Semis.

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07-13-2013, 12:58 PM
  #100
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Not really. Various translations of "No al calcio moderno" (No to modern football) is the most common message found on banners at matches across Europe, there are many voices across the continent calling for a salary cap and the coming financial fair play regulations are at least in part intended to level the playing field somewhat.

You will find very few football fans who actively support the status quo.
Thank you

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