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Is there an order to learn skating skills?

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07-31-2013, 07:25 AM
  #1
BrummieRed
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Is there an order to learn skating skills?

I was wondering if some things naturally come before others because they are precursors in terms of muscle strength, control, balance, sheer nerve etc.

EG, since getting crossovers down my tight turns have improved a lot. Also since really getting crossovers sorted my lateral quick feet have improved.

Any idea if there's a recommended order to learn skating skills?

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07-31-2013, 07:44 AM
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CGNY87
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Just off the top of my head:

Foward
Backward
Foward crossovers
Hockey Stop
Backwards stop (going fast and coming to a dead stop)
Backwards crossovers

That is the order that I learned them. Most of the prevous skills help with the next skill.

Forward and backward skating helps you get used to skating so you can move onto crossovers more comfortably. The edge work from normal skating and crossovers will help with learning the hockey stop. The skills learned from the hockey stop obviously translate into how to stop quickly when skating backwards. And finally, all that edge work makes backwards crossovers easier to learn.

But overall just practice. Hockey stops were the hardest to learn. Mainly because they are the most terrifying to a new skater. After working on my edge work for awhile hockey stops seemed to come almost naturally.

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07-31-2013, 08:39 AM
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BrummieRed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGNY87 View Post
But overall just practice. Hockey stops were the hardest to learn. Mainly because they are the most terrifying to a new skater.
Yeah, I already ended up with a hospital visit from these

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07-31-2013, 07:08 PM
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blackat
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I'd personally say learning to hockey stop is right up the top of the list, especially if you're practicing at general skating sessions. You need to be able to stop at the drop of a hat! I'm still working on stopping on my opposite leg, it's a real pain getting over that fear factor.

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07-31-2013, 09:43 PM
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nullterm
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1. Stand up, fall down, get up again
2. Skating forward, turns
3. Stopping

Everything else...
4. Backwards
5. Crossovers
6. Transition forward-to/from-backwards
7. etc

Learning to stop is probably your biggest early milestone. Learning how to shift your weight, use your edges, etc. Fundamentals of being able to stop helps everything else.

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07-31-2013, 10:48 PM
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RandV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackat View Post
I'd personally say learning to hockey stop is right up the top of the list, especially if you're practicing at general skating sessions. You need to be able to stop at the drop of a hat! I'm still working on stopping on my opposite leg, it's a real pain getting over that fear factor.
Hah, I was probably doing forward crossovers before I was 10, but didn't learn how to stop until I was 27 and finally started playing hockey

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08-01-2013, 01:08 AM
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blackat
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Originally Posted by RandV View Post
Hah, I was probably doing forward crossovers before I was 10, but didn't learn how to stop until I was 27 and finally started playing hockey
I'm the exact opposite; stops were one of the first things I learnt after I got my hockey skates, but I'm only just getting the hang of forward crossovers ten years later! (That said, most of that time was spent skating in drips and drabs).

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08-02-2013, 02:10 AM
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BmxHockey
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My progressions.
Fwd stride.
Fwd Crossovers
Couldn't figure out how to stop.
Was clueless on backward skating-couldn't grasp the concept.
Joined some hockey skating drils clinics anyways-full kook.

Kept doing them.

Finally hired a coach. College female player.

Everything I learned on YouTube was NO. She reconfigured everything.
Fwd strides.
Stopping!
Fwd crossovers
Going from fwd to backwards (like te pros do it/picking up the feet).
Backward crossovers
Backward snow plow stop.

Stay low and bend the knees she would tell all the time.

I would honor to public sessions and dedicate time to one or two drills-go deep into making my corrections automatic.

Now my skating is good-good to where players think I've been playing for 10-20 years good. Fast, efficient, and can skate with upper level players.

Hire a coach- best money ever spent.

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08-02-2013, 03:09 AM
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blackat
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^ Oh man, youtube is not so good? I've been referring back to it for the correct foot placement for two-foot stops. I can snowplow stop on one foot, but I'm struggling getting the second one to follow behind, using the inside edge.

Or am I getting it totally wrong?

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08-02-2013, 03:22 AM
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jnk96
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The hockey stop is definitely the most difficult part of skating! I finally learned how to do it with my left foot inside and right foot outside but still can't do it the other way round. Fear is a big factor here obviously. I never skated wearing hockey equipment. If I did, I'd probably just try everything until I'm able to do it. But without equipment I'm always too afraid of falling over and hurting anything.

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08-02-2013, 03:32 AM
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Originally Posted by KelownaRocketsFan View Post
The hockey stop is definitely the most difficult part of skating! I finally learned how to do it with my left foot inside and right foot outside but still can't do it the other way round. Fear is a big factor here obviously. I never skated wearing hockey equipment. If I did, I'd probably just try everything until I'm able to do it. But without equipment I'm always too afraid of falling over and hurting anything.
I'm the same! I try to wear gloves so that at least I can convince myself the fall won't burn my hands, haha. I hate that feeling of ice on skin!

Do you have any advice for getting up that courage? I'm good at a one-foot stop in the correct feet placement, but I can't get the second inside foot to make contact with the ice on the stop, and if I DO get it to make contact, it's just the tip of the blade.

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08-02-2013, 03:42 AM
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Originally Posted by blackat View Post
I'm the same! I try to wear gloves so that at least I can convince myself the fall won't burn my hands, haha. I hate that feeling of ice on skin!

Do you have any advice for getting up that courage? I'm good at a one-foot stop in the correct feet placement, but I can't get the second inside foot to make contact with the ice on the stop, and if I DO get it to make contact, it's just the tip of the blade.
I taught myself how to hockey stop when I was 18. I had an amazing amount of bruises on my hips from falling. My advice is to buy well padded hockey pants and practice in them.

Consider though, if you are worried about falling down learning to skate if hockey is really the right sport for you. Even after you know how to skate you still fall down sometimes.

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08-02-2013, 03:51 AM
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Originally Posted by jazzykat View Post
I taught myself how to hockey stop when I was 18. I had an amazing amount of bruises on my hips from falling. My advice is to buy well padded hockey pants and practice in them.

Consider though, if you are worried about falling down learning to skate if hockey is really the right sport for you. Even after you know how to skate you still fall down sometimes.
Dude, I've been skating for ten years. I have fallen more times than I can count. I don't think I need a lecture, haha. I was merely saying that I do not like the burn of the ice - doesn't mean I can't stand it.

I know how to hockey stop, however I have not been skating regularly for the past five years and thus I'm easing myself back into it. Most of it is a confidence issue.

I don't have the money for hockey gear right now, so I'm working on getting my skating back up to scratch first.

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08-02-2013, 08:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackat View Post
I'd personally say learning to hockey stop is right up the top of the list, especially if you're practicing at general skating sessions. You need to be able to stop at the drop of a hat! I'm still working on stopping on my opposite leg, it's a real pain getting over that fear factor.
This is where I'm at right now. Played roller for about 10 years and had no problems stopping in either direction on sport court floor. Now that I'm starting to play ice, the transition has been much tougher than I thought. And the fear is a big part of it lol.

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08-02-2013, 08:23 AM
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^ I'm in the same boat - the roller to ice transition is harder than you would think. Stopping does come, it just takes a little time. I have one side down solid now and I'm making good progress on the off-side. It took me about 2-3 months of practice skating 2 times a week or so. One thing that did help was sharpening my skates to 5/8.

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08-02-2013, 09:47 AM
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jnk96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzykat View Post
Consider though, if you are worried about falling down learning to skate if hockey is really the right sport for you. Even after you know how to skate you still fall down sometimes.
Are you serious?! When I know how to stop, I just do it. If I fall over, well, there are nicer things in life but hell I don't really care about it. But as long as you can't do it and you're sure that you'll fall over like 5000 times until you're able to stop... Well, that's quite an issue.

I hurt myself loooooots of times and seriously, I don't care about it. But still, that's nothing you do voluntarily.

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08-02-2013, 08:01 PM
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I think if you are learning to skate you should work on what you are good at and the rest will come in time. Develop your skills and the rest will fall into place. You'll become bored with what you already know and then move on to something else that you (suddenly, but not really) feel more comfortable at.

Try all the new stuff on your storing side first. It will be easier to learn the technique there first. Copy that to your weak side as you learn your proper technique.

Remember, edges are the key to everything.

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08-03-2013, 12:11 AM
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Originally Posted by SpringfieldSkins View Post
I think if you are learning to skate you should work on what you are good at and the rest will come in time. Develop your skills and the rest will fall into place. You'll become bored with what you already know and then move on to something else that you (suddenly, but not really) feel more comfortable at.

Try all the new stuff on your storing side first. It will be easier to learn the technique there first. Copy that to your weak side as you learn your proper technique.

Remember, edges are the key to everything.
Well said, I agree...

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08-05-2013, 01:32 AM
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Originally Posted by blackat View Post
^ Oh man, youtube is not so good? I've been referring back to it for the correct foot placement for two-foot stops. I can snowplow stop on one foot, but I'm struggling getting the second one to follow behind, using the inside edge.

Or am I getting it totally wrong?
I don't really know but I think there's something to be said about watching someone skate at home on your computer then going to the rink and trying to imitate it. You're probably not going to be able to tell if what you're doing is actually the same as what the guy on youtube was showing, while a coach would be able to spot you and give you the correct adjustments.

As for stopping, a big reason I think I had a hard time learning was because I was always trying to do that picture perfect parallel type stop. So the one time I was out at a public skate determined to learn how to stop because I was enrolling in hockey no, I just started watching how other people did it. Saw a guy stop by keeping his feet in a line, tried it myself and it came to me rather easily. And once I got that down it wasn't hard to learn how to stop more the normal way.

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08-05-2013, 03:22 AM
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For me it was:

Forwards
Backwards
Hockey stops (these were a pain until I just padded myself up and went for it... that's really the way to do it if you can)
Cross-overs
Pivots
Backwards cross-overs (the hardest one to learn after hockey stops)

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08-05-2013, 04:36 AM
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blackat
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Originally Posted by RandV View Post
I don't really know but I think there's something to be said about watching someone skate at home on your computer then going to the rink and trying to imitate it. You're probably not going to be able to tell if what you're doing is actually the same as what the guy on youtube was showing, while a coach would be able to spot you and give you the correct adjustments.

As for stopping, a big reason I think I had a hard time learning was because I was always trying to do that picture perfect parallel type stop. So the one time I was out at a public skate determined to learn how to stop because I was enrolling in hockey no, I just started watching how other people did it. Saw a guy stop by keeping his feet in a line, tried it myself and it came to me rather easily. And once I got that down it wasn't hard to learn how to stop more the normal way.
Thanks man, I'm going to try that out! I've been trying to do the perfect parallel stop too...I'm good with my feet placement, I just need to bring more pressure on my inside leg.

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08-06-2013, 02:02 PM
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Learning

I put on skates for the first time this past February at the age of 47. I've probably been to public skate 30-35 times since. I've likely learned fairly slowly as I was overly afraid of falling and breaking something.

I have watched a lot of videos on YouTube to guide my learning. With a lot of overlap on this list, my order of learning was....

1. Forward skating with gliding turns.
2. Snow plow stops.
3. Hockey stop on one side. (This came early for me due to three winters of snow skiing from my childhood). Stopping on the other side seemed impossible early on.
4. Forward to backward transition on one side. Still weak on the other side.
5. Backward swizzles.
6. Forward crossovers (took a long time to even attempt, mostly due to lack of courage)
7. Much improved backward skating & forward strides
8. Backwards crossovers are a current work-in-process. Getting pretty good on one side and think I'll get the other side soon.

My backward crossover on the good side is now probably better than either direction of forward crossover. I need lots of improvement on transitions.

My goal is to skate well enough to try an intro-to-hockey program in the Fall.

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08-06-2013, 02:41 PM
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As someone who got into hockey as an adult, and had to teach myself a lot of the hockey-style skating technique, here's my tidbit of advice for learning to hockey stop.

1) Don't try to skip learning the snowplow stop. This was my mistake. "I'm never going to use this playing hockey, don't need to know it!" No. You DO need to know it!

2) Get really good at doing the aforementioned snowplows.

3) Now try lifting your weaker foot up while doing a snowplow. Much to your surprise, you will find you can do snowplows on one foot without falling over. Which is, of course, the same thing as a one-footed hockey stop.

4) When you get comfortable with those one-footed stops, introduce your back foot as a support. Boom, you can now do a completely comfortable hockey stop.

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08-07-2013, 07:38 AM
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http://www.hockeyus.com/news-article...planation.html

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08-07-2013, 06:40 PM
  #25
BmxHockey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
I put on skates for the first time this past February at the age of 47. I've probably been to public skate 30-35 times since. I've likely learned fairly slowly as I was overly afraid of falling and breaking something.

I have watched a lot of videos on YouTube to guide my learning. With a lot of overlap on this list, my order of learning was....

1. Forward skating with gliding turns.
2. Snow plow stops.
3. Hockey stop on one side. (This came early for me due to three winters of snow skiing from my childhood). Stopping on the other side seemed impossible early on.
4. Forward to backward transition on one side. Still weak on the other side.
5. Backward swizzles.
6. Forward crossovers (took a long time to even attempt, mostly due to lack of courage)
7. Much improved backward skating & forward strides
8. Backwards crossovers are a current work-in-process. Getting pretty good on one side and think I'll get the other side soon.

My backward crossover on the good side is now probably better than either direction of forward crossover. I need lots of improvement on transitions.

My goal is to skate well enough to try an intro-to-hockey program in the Fall.
Keep up the good work. Also, learning a skill takes repetition to make it automatic, but doing it wrong develops habits that are hard to overwrite through correction.

Just go take that class now-you're ready, because fact is, no one is ready enough, lol. You can ask coaches then about your skating and what they recommend for lessons. They might point to some power skating class with kids. I did that, it's humbling but good ice time to get some coaching.

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