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Interested in refereeing

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Old
11-04-2006, 01:15 AM
  #1
Pascal
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Interested in refereeing

I am wondering if any of you officiate, at any level, and how you started out? Were you a player before you started? Did you have to work a lot on your skating and conditioning? How much of a commitment is it to you?

I read a lot of the info on the NHLOA site, and it's something I'd really like to do.

thanks

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11-05-2006, 05:05 PM
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Gino 14
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Good luck to you, hope you have thick skin. Playing the game before reffing is a plus, but I don't think it's a limiting factor. You might want to start studying the rules, I didn't realize how much there was to the game until I started reading the rules. Good luck with whatever you decide.

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11-05-2006, 05:28 PM
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It should be a requirement that refs have played the game before, I don't know how it wouldn't be. With that being said, good luck to you, I'd play net before I'd ever ref!

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11-06-2006, 12:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Doctor Hook View Post
It should be a requirement that refs have played the game before, I don't know how it wouldn't be. With that being said, good luck to you, I'd play net before I'd ever ref!
9 out of 10 referees played minor hockey and started officiating at 12-13 years old to get some extra pocket cash. Those who continued beyond the typical few years and got serious with officiating are those who realized they wouldn't have playing careers and saw officiating as a way to stay in the game. For example, NHL referee Kelly Sutherland made it his life dream to make the NHL when he was 16 years old. At the same time, a lot of current pro officials played Jr.A, Major Junior, minor pro and former NHL referees Paul Stewart and Kevin Maguire had a cup of coffee as players in the NHL.

To answer the thread starter, contact your local minor hockey association, and they will put you in touch with the local Referee In Chief.

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11-15-2006, 08:40 PM
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I currently am reff'ing my second year, and used to play. I don't know that it is a accurate comment to say you need to have thick skin. When you start out you are doing games that are typically B and C level starting at SquirtB, PeeWeeC and U12B and below. You get exposed to coaches that are typically dads that are jumping in to help out at the lower level. When you are skating at these levels you don't need to be the best skater, IMO you need to have more of a coaching mentality. Face it you are officiating games at the lower levels as such the players you are involved with need more correction than actual penalties. These players typically violate rules not by intention but more by accident and not fully knowing what is legal and illegal.

It is by far the best seat in the house, and you see the game like you never have. Jump in and go for it...

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11-16-2006, 01:43 AM
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FLYLine24
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I played hockey since I was 8, when I turned 18 and left high school and went to college I started reffing. Best decision I made. I LOVE refereeing, I work for one of the best reffing organization in New York and I was a extremely quick learner and thankfully my Referee in Chief saw a lot of potential in me at 18 so I was getting Midget games in my 2nd month and it helped me greatly. Now at 21 im doing Junior A games in NY and am refereeing at the Midget state tournaments each year.

Next year my I should be starting NCAA Division 1 hockey games, not the top level like the big name schools but the local area schools (like about 50 miles and less...Sacred Heart, Army, etc and Girls D1 NCAA hockey).

I'm a great skater so that was a huge plus but you have you know know the rules and interpret them on the ice to be successful in refereeing.

If your dedicated enough you'll have a bright future...if your in it just for the money then whatever, you probably won't get very far and will be doing low level hockey for your time.

After reffing for a year I had to get back on the ice and playing as well, last year I joined an adult league and this year i joined another so im playing in 2 leagues as well.

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11-16-2006, 04:41 AM
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Getting into refereeing isn't too hard, it's just advancing yourself up to higher levels is what is hard. I don't remember the specifics, but for USA officiating once you get to higher levels they actually test your skating and knowledge of the rulebook.

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11-16-2006, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Caner Soze View Post
Getting into refereeing isn't too hard, it's just advancing yourself up to higher levels is what is hard. I don't remember the specifics, but for USA officiating once you get to higher levels they actually test your skating and knowledge of the rulebook.
USA hockey tests your knowledge of the rulebook all along the way. The skate test doesn't come until you get to level 4.

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11-17-2006, 12:18 AM
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but for USA officiating once you get to higher levels they actually test your skating and knowledge of the rulebook.
No competent association allows an official on the ice without testing rulebook knowledge, including USA Hockey.

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11-17-2006, 03:20 AM
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i find that it is more important to continue playing more than it is to have played a lot beforehand. i played a lot before and it helps, but i find that referess who do it a lot get an attitiude that seperates them from players, and they forget what its like to be a player. i think every ref if they are still able should keep playing, even if its a crap level. it can do wonders for a refs attitude and game management, imo. its tougher to talk down to a player, when a ref did it to you a couple nights earlier.

i agree a tough skin is pretty necassary, especially in the lower levels. everyone in intermediate levels thinks they know everything and want to test you, everyone who really knows what they're doing sits back and waits for you to hang yourself. when talking to coaches, just say what needs to be said, dont over explain.

if youre aiming for a higher level, its helps to have played. reading a rule book is a lot different from using it. "game awareness" is pretty important, and its easier to attain if you played. having said that, if you didnt play a lot - experiencing a lot of reffing is the only thing that will catch you up. ref everywhere you can as much as possible. being the guy who always shows up on time and never flakes will get you further than you know.


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11-18-2006, 12:20 AM
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Originally Posted by bleedgreen View Post
i find that it is more important to continue playing more than it is to have played a lot beforehand. i played a lot before and it helps, but i find that referess who do it a lot get an attitiude that seperates them from players, and they forget what its like to be a player. i think every ref if they are still able should keep playing, even if its a crap level. it can do wonders for a refs attitude and game management, imo. its tougher to talk down to a player, when a ref did it to you a couple nights earlier.

i agree a tough skin is pretty necassary, especially in the lower levels. everyone in intermediate levels thinks they know everything and want to test you, everyone who really knows what they're doing sits back and waits for you to hang yourself. when talking to coaches, just say what needs to be said, dont over explain.

if youre aiming for a higher level, its helps to have played. reading a rule book is a lot different from using it. "game awareness" is pretty important, and its easier to attain if you played. having said that, if you didnt play a lot - experiencing a lot of reffing is the only thing that will catch you up. ref everywhere you can as much as possible. being the guy who always shows up on time and never flakes will get you further than you know.
I agree and I don't.

Game management (or game awareness) is out the window. Hockey Canada, USA Hockey and the IIHF all have adopted the NHL's no-tolerance standard of officiating. You see it, you have to call it.

Playing is good, but even when I still played (up until I was 15), I didn't think as a player when I was officiating. Especially now, with the new standard, it might even be the other way around in terms of how playing can benefit you as an official. A player officiating might let things go due to knowing what it's like as a player, when starting this season, he can't do that anymore.

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11-18-2006, 12:28 AM
  #12
FLYLine24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bleedgreen View Post
i find that it is more important to continue playing more than it is to have played a lot beforehand. i played a lot before and it helps, but i find that referess who do it a lot get an attitiude that seperates them from players, and they forget what its like to be a player. i think every ref if they are still able should keep playing, even if its a crap level. it can do wonders for a refs attitude and game management, imo. its tougher to talk down to a player, when a ref did it to you a couple nights earlier.

i agree a tough skin is pretty necassary, especially in the lower levels. everyone in intermediate levels thinks they know everything and want to test you, everyone who really knows what they're doing sits back and waits for you to hang yourself. when talking to coaches, just say what needs to be said, dont over explain.

if youre aiming for a higher level, its helps to have played. reading a rule book is a lot different from using it. "game awareness" is pretty important, and its easier to attain if you played. having said that, if you didnt play a lot - experiencing a lot of reffing is the only thing that will catch you up. ref everywhere you can as much as possible. being the guy who always shows up on time and never flakes will get you further than you know.
Agree with this. I stopped playing when I was 17 (that's when I started reffing). I was a good ref to start with from what I heard..but that's not the point...I did have an attitude problem and i knew i did with players/coaches (nothing too serious that got me in trouble, but even I noticed it). I started playing again at 19 in 2 adult leagues and I feel since then i've become even a better ref now that i know again how it feels to be a player and how to relate to players/coaches who complain. I try to explain every I can, even if it means to take time in the game, most refs won't in my organization but now I have no problem with it. If they understand where i'm coming from and how I saw it they usually drop it and understand.

But playing IMO doesn't really matter to some refs and definitely isn't a must.

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