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Old
08-01-2013, 03:36 AM
  #126
seventieslord
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Dmitri Khristich !!!


Awards and Achievements:
2 x NHL All-Star (1997, 1999)

Scoring Accomplishments:
596 Points in 811 NHL Regular Season Games
40 Points in 75 NHL Play-off Games

Scoring Percentges:
Points – 73, 67, 66, 58, 53, 48, 45
ES Points - 75, 67, 64, 61, 60, 59, 55

Best 6 Seasons: 365

Team Scoring Placements:
Points – 1st(1997), 2nd(1994), 2nd(1996), 2nd(1998), 2nd(1999), 4th(1992), 5th(1995), 6th(1993)
Goals – 1st(1994), 1st(1996), 1st(1999), 2nd(1992), 2nd(1998), 3rd(1993), 3rd(1995), 3rd(1997)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
A skilled left-winger and centre whose intensity has been questioned, Dimitri Khristich has demonstrated undeniable skill since entering the NHL in 1990-91. He entered the 2001-02 season as a key component of the highly-skilled Washington Capitals.

Born in Kiev, USSR, Khristich played six years for Sokol Kiev where he was a solid two-way forward. He was chosen 120th overall by Washington in 1988 when his talent was considered very raw. He progressed and took on greater responsibilities for Kiev over the next two years and played for the USSR when it won gold at the 1990 World Championships.

After starting the 1990-91 season in Kiev, Khristich joined the Capitals and scored 27 points in 40 games as a rookie. When he signed with the Caps on December 11, 1990, the 21-year-old Khristich made history as the youngest player ever allowed to leave the Soviet Union. The next season he broke through with 36 goals and was a consistent offensive threat until the end of the 1994-95 season. There was a concern over the drop in Khristich's play in the playoffs when tighter checking predominated. However, this malady was rampant throughout the team as it continually put up mediocre results in the post-season.

Khristich was traded to the Los Angeles Kings in July 1995 and he went on to score 27 goals in 1995-96 when he was named the team's most valuable player. During his time on the West Coast, Khristich played centre briefly on a line with Vladimir Tsyplakov and Vitali Yachmenev. In August 1997 he and goalie Byron Dafoe were sent to the Boston Bruins for Jozef Stumpel and Sandy Moger.

Khristich recorded consecutive 29-goal seasons and was one of the Bruins' best all-round forwards. A contract squabble with general manager Harry Sinden led to the Ukrainian being traded to Toronto where he disappointed with only 30 points in 53 games. He was also a non-factor when the Leafs were eliminated by the stronger New Jersey Devils in the second round. After a slow start and significant time spent in the press box, Khristich was traded to Washington where he started quickly then faded and ended up with only 13 goals in 70 games. His career was at an important juncture as the 2001-02 season began.




Scouting Reports:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1991-92
Khristich is a rather lumbering skater who is strong on his skates, but not fast. He doesn’t explode to the puck so much as he treks toward it. At times Khristich will force a rush, rather than looking to give-and-go. He lines one move where he takes the puck to the defenseman’s left, then tries to go around, to the right, before reclaiming the puck. He has good instincts. He will try certain plays, simply to see if they work. Khristich likes to score, wants to score, and will try a number of methods to achieve that objective. He will shoot off the back foot, set up a screen and use it, or will use a quick release to whip a quick, accurate snap shot of deceptive speed from the top of the circle. Khristich is alert defensively and an asset on penalty killing. He played center in the Soviet Union, where the center has the high defensive responsibilities, so Khristich knows what to do in the checking role and can handle it well against the opposition’s first or second lines.

Khristich is not a banger, but he is strong, he will bump and he doesn’t shy away from the boards at all. In fact, he likes the boards and traffic and is very aggressive in his pursuit of loose pucks. He uses his body mass to advantage along the boards and in the corners. Khristich adjusted to the North American game very quickly. He has great desire and determination to become a star here and owns the mental toughness to act on his wish. He is popular with teammates, likes to hang around with them, and eagerly participates in team functions. There is a fine upside to his NHL future.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1992-93
Khristich is a key to the Capitals’ power play. He plants himself at the post to the goaltender’s right, his forehand open and available, and waits for a crossing pass from whoever is stalling for time to the goaltender’s left. Every NHL team knows the play, every coach tells his team to watch for it, but Khristich still runs up his PP goal total. The pass comes across the goalmouth, just out of the goalie’s reach, and Khristich slams it in. Of course, if a defenseman goes to Khristich away from the puck, then whoever is holding it can work a two-on-one against the other defenseman. That can force a forward to cheat low, which opens up a point shot. So Khristich, just be standing where he likes to stay on the PP, is causing all kinds of chaos. But if he didn’t have the special hand-eye coordination to convert those passes, all this would be moot. Instead, you get an idea of the multi-purpose threat Khristich poses. He is not a dazzling skater with an impressive, powerful stride. He covers ground, though, changes direction fairly quickly and moves the puck pretty well. He can make a rush in open ice, picking up steam gradually and finishing the play with a heavy wrist shot that sizzles to the upper corners.

Khristich is responsible in the neutral zone, challenging the puck with poke checks and sweep checks, looking to create a turnover. While killing penalties, he does a good job challenging point shots – playing them goalie-style, so the shooter has to get it past Khristich, as well as the goaltender. He goes into the nasty areas of the ice, as well. When the puck goes to the boards, so does Khristich, who willingly uses his muscle in the traffic. If defensemen think he’s going to be easy to ride off the puck, Khristich surprises them with his strength.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1992-93
Khristich is an immensely talented forward. He is a key component on the PP, because while the defensemen rocket the puck back and forth at the point, he’s ready and waiting down low… Khristich has good hand-eye coordination for deflection and for winning faceoffs. He is not a very fast skater, but he has a long, strong stride and very good balance. His hockey sense is very good, and he is responsible defensively as well as creative offensively. One weakness is that he puts himself into a position where he gets hit – and hurt. Perhaps he is holding onto the puck too long, or else he isn’t smart enough to know when to go into the corners or the front of the net and when to back off. In Europe, the game is different, and Khristich has not mastered the timing of North American-sized rinks.

Khristich is a very strong skater and is willing to go into the trenches. He is tough to knock off the puck and protects it well with his body. If he can avoid getting hurt, he will be more of a factor. He has the best size of the Caps’ “Euroforwards” and the most tenacity. His skill level is there too, but so far he has been unable to take his game out of the 30-goal range. A little more muscle on his line wouldn’t hurt.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1993-94
An outstanding two-way player, Khristich works as hard at his checking assignment as he does when the puck is on the end of his stick. Khristich is a lanky winger, a rugged customer who’ll throw a check but won’t go out of his way to nail somebody. His greatest tools are his shooting and his will to win. He is something of a streaky scorer. He is less of a playmaker than a finisher and could be even more effective if he learned to use his linemates better.

WILL – score lots of goals
CAN’T – be intimidated
EXPECT – fine two-way play
DON’T EXPECT – an easy mark
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 1994-95
Tough Kiev winger slumped badly in 2nd half. Average skater who is strong on the puck and doesn’t shy away from physical stuff has averaged 30 goals per season – without benefit of a 1st line center.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1994-95
Khristich is no floater, rather, he works both ends of the ice, causing turnovers and capitalizing on mistakes. When the Caps are on the attack, he’s a determined skater who will not be deterred by the opposition. He’s big and strong and can take the necessary punishment in the slot and along the boards. He has great hands and can fire the puck from the wing as well as find openings inside. The caps would be well-advised to put a “protector” on Khristich’s line so that he would not have to absorb quite the punishment he’s taken early in his career. He’s a big target and sometimes lets himself get nailed… his skills are superb, his attitude and desire undisputed, but he can’t remain a 35-goal player and enjoy a popular place in the minds of fans who see him as a potential 45-50 goal scorer.

WILL – be a scoring ace
CAN’T – be pushed around
EXPECT – good two-way play
DON’T EXPECT – dumb penalties
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 1995-96
Grinding Kiev winger… good in the corners and strong on the puck with only average speed, a more consistent effort is required before he returns to 92-93 form.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1995-96
Khristich works hard at both ends of the ice, forechecking and forcing mistakes in the opposition. When attacking, he’s a determined, straightforward skater who will skate right through a check. He is big, powerfully built, and willing to absorb his share of punishment in the slot and along the boards, usually without retaliation. He has excellent hands and will unleash the puck from the wing with great velocity. Despite being genuinely tough, Khristich could use some protection. He provides a big target for players looking to run him, and occasionally he gets nailed but good. The Kings must send a message that Khristich is not going to be a human punching bag – that if you mess with him you mess with the whole team. Nobody doubts his skill or his attitude, and his desire to win is beyond reproach. However, if he doesn’t break out of the 30-35 goal range soon, he might be stuck with the rap of being an underachiever.

WILL – score a bunch
CAN’T – be intimidated
EXPECT – effort at both ends
DON’T EXPECT – many mistakes
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996-97
A hard worker whether he’s forechecking or picking up his check in the defensive posture, Khristich relies on good skating speed and balance. His pursuit of the puck is relentless. He has excellent size and strength, and he doesn’t mind taking a hit to make a play. It’s rare that he’s goaded into taking stupid penalties. He has both a hard shot and good finesse with the puck, making him an all-around threat. Khristich has taken his share of pummeling at the hands of burly defenders and hard-nosed wingers, who bang him into the boards and try to intimidate him. He’s tough enough, but appears unwilling to send the kind of message that he won’t be fooled with – so he is. When the Kings traded Gretzky, that left Khristich as their top scorer. He could fill that role in Washington where the team had a strong defensive strategy at work, but in LA, where they give up goals like it’s one big shooting garage sale, he’ll have to be more of a contributor in all aspects.

WILL – grind after puck
CAN’T – carry the kings
EXPECT – a two-way winger
DON’T EXPECT – 100 point seasons
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
Part of his tendency to put himself in a position to get hit, and hurt, is from holding onto the puck to make a perfect play… a very sturdy skater but lacks physical presence. He will go into trenches and is tough to knock off the puck. He protects the puck well. Unless the Kings upgrade their personnel, Khristich rankes as their best forward. He doesn’t have much talent to work with, and he’s not a great one-on-one player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 1996-97
although not a great skater, he is strong on the puck and a good cornerman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1996-97
Local media made Khristich the team’s MVP. Likes to fire away. A consistent goal scorer. Will begin the season as the #1 left winger… will get plenty of work on the PP… will easily lead the Kings in points again.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 1997-98
He led the team in scoring and was voted team MVP so what’s the problem? The Kings were hoping he’d step up in the wake of Gretzky’s departure and produce breakout numbers. But his output (56 points) can’t be too much of a shock considering his best season came back in 1991-92. He has good skill and is very strong on the puck, but is neither a great skater nor the star scorer the franchise needs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
only the Buffalo sabres had a team scoring leader with fewer points than Khristich, and the fact that their scoring leader was also matched up against other team’s top lines illustrates the dearth of talent up front… Khristich has not been as much of a factor on the PP as in recent seasons. The Kings ran a very disorganized PP last season and didn’t have an effective point man, which limited the work he could do down low.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1997-98
near the end of his prime… best playmaker on the team, which tells you that this team is in trouble. Defensively aware. Strong onto the puck. Holds onto the rubber like scrooge to money, hoping for the highlight reel pass, thus he shoots even less than he used to. More of a second line-type player, he’ll be asked to put the Russian Line and PP on his shoulders again this season. Will lead the Kings in scoring, a sure sign they’ll miss the playoffs again.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 1998-99
versatile ex-cap delivered an impressive stretch run with 23 points over the final 21 games… physical and skilled with a powerful shot, he is very strong on the puck but can be erratic on times. As he is not one of Burns’ favourites, management rates him below market value and contract talks could get messy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
His hockey sense is excellent… could lose his spot to Joe Thornton… the Bruins don’t consider him a bonafide 1st line player, probably because of a lack of physical commitment, but they didn’t have much else to work with last season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1999-2000
was listed as MIA in the 1st round of the playoffs. If this guy showed up to play every night he would be one of the league’s elite. He doesn’t. Khristich has world class skills, but his inconsistency holds him back. When he’s hot, he’s an amazing scorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 1999-2000
won a 1.95M arbitration ruling last summer… was a complete no-show in the postseason. When inspired, has the sharp offensive skills and great strength on the puck to be a top line player, but too often has a tendency to lose interest… B’s will walk away from arbitration decision. Decaying returns.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1999-2000
The Bruins have had it with Khristich’s inconsistent effort and were looking to deal their second-leading scorer during the offseason. Even with the ability to score 30 goals and 70 points, his ability to show up every night drives coaches crazy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2000-01
Khristich failed to provide the 2nd line scoring the leafs were expecting. A master of the garbage goal, he likes to plant himself just off to the side of the net on the PP. A decent two-way player, he is overrated as a scorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000-01
has good hand-eye coordination for deflections and can even take draws. Boston walked away after Khristich won a salary arbitration ruling in 1999, and he played as if he had something to prove with the Leafs. He soldiered on through the playoffs despite torn ligaments in his wrist. He will probably play on a 3rd line this season and could provide good numbers while performing his defensive job. If he plays with the same passion and consistency he did last season, he can score 20 goals in his full-time role.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 2000-01
talented two-way forward has excellent strength on the puck and can play all three forward spots but was not the same creative offensive player that posted back-to-back 29 goal seasons with the Bruins.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001-02
injuries may have been a factor last season, since he needed surgery to remove bone chips in his elbow after the season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s 2001-02
made an instant splash during his 2nd stint in Washington with 14 points in his first 11 games but was never the same after returning from a January hamstring injury. Tough, two-way forward valued for his goal-scoring and tremendous versatility, he temporarily jumpstarted the caps’ top line and PP with his strong puck skills, however quickly faded to the checking unit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2001-02
enigmatic winger has landed back in Washington. While he seems more comfortable now, he needs to pick up his game. He possesses good hockey sense and a lethal shot. What has frustrated many is the big Russian’s propensity to disappear for several games at a time. He’s solid defensively, but when you’re making big money you must produce more than he has.

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Old
08-01-2013, 03:43 AM
  #127
seventieslord
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D Slim Halderson



- 6'3", 200 lbs.
- Stanley Cup (1925)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1926)
- Olympic Gold (1920)
- Allan Cup (1920)
- PCHA 1st All-Star Team (1923)
- PCHA 2nd All-Star Team (1922)
- AHA 1st All-Star Team (1930, 1936, 1937)
- 2nd, 3rd in scoring by PCHA defensemen (1922, 1923)
- 5th in scoring in playoffs and Stanley Cup games with 2 goals (1925, 1926)

Halderson first gained notoriety as a valuable member of the Winnipeg Falcons, who won the 1920 Allan Cup and then represented Canada in the 1920 Olympics, winning Gold. Halderson paced the rest of the Canada squad besides Fredrickson, scoring 9 goals as a RW (to Fredrickson's 12, next-best had 3), leading outright with 2 assists, and pacing all others but Fredrickson with 11 points (Fredrickson had 13, next-best had 4).

Halderson left the NHL at age 29 in 1927, but played 10 more seasons in the CAHL and the AHA, both of which were excellent leagues.

He was always among the best defensemen in these leagues, even his final two years, when he was a first team all-star. He placed in the top-5 in scoring by defensemen 7 times in those 10 years (2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 5th.)

In his entire recorded hockey career, including playoff games, he played 749 of 764 scheduled games over 20 years - 0.75 games missed per year, or a 98% attendance rate!
With 656 pro games played by his 1937 retirement, I believe he had played more games of pro hockey than anyone at that point.

Top Level Pro (PCHA/WCHL/WHL/NHL): 177-32-21-51-276, PO: 17-4-2-6-36
Other (Senior/Olympics/CAHL/AHA/SSHL): 504-105-97-202-712, PO: 52-30-17-47-61


From Spalding's Athletic Library:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Winnipegfalcons.com
Fredrickson's right bower and giant of the team. A clever all-round player with exceptional stick-handling ability. Played junior hockey with the Young Men's Lutheran Club team three years ago, and made his debut in the senior ranks in 1916-1917 with Ypres team in the Military League. Performed well in the Allan Cup final against Kitchener in Toronto. Joined Monarchs last winter, but failed to show his true form. Came back to life with a bang this season under the genial influence of the Falcon Club and played an important part in helping his team land the right to travel in quest of the Allan Cup. Is the matinee idol of the Falcon team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings Of the Ice.
Harold Halderson was known as "Slim" throughout his long career. He was a strapping 6'3" in an era were most players were much smaller, but his 200 pound frame was lean and gangly. He had a loose-limbed skating style that looked awkward at first, but his rushes down the wing, combined with his defensive savvy, allowed him to play for 20 years in leagues across North America. He achieved lasting recognition in Canada for his play at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp, Belgium.

During an early practice, coach ********* was trying hard to keep the players from straying from their positions. One of the worst offenders was Halderson, a good puck carrier who would get a head of steam going down his right wing and then continue across center when he entered the offensive zone. Halderson bumped heads with another player during a drill designed to keep him on his part of the ice. A few minutes later, he again carried the puck across his imaginary line and the coach smacked the winger across the seat with his stick to stop him. Halderson apologized, saying, "It must have been the bump on the head."

...After watching the speed with which Canadians like Slim Halderson could shoot the puck, Sweden's goaltender hurriedly found some cotton padding to wrap around himself... Halderson scored against the Czechs with ease, finishing with seven goals in a 15-0 victory... The Swedish team advanced to the Gold medal game. Halderson scored the first-ever goal in an Olympic final just over a minute in. He added another in the third period as Canada won 12-1.
Accounts of Halderson's play:

From Senior hockey:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon Phoenix, March 29, 1920
No better front line than Halderson, Goodman and Frederickson has been seen on Toronto ice in years. All are adept at backchecking, work well together and are dangerous on the attack.
From the 1925 Playoffs:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Morning Leader, March 11, 1925
Holding a two-goal lead, the cougars elected to play a strong defensive game and due to the smooth work of Halderson, Fraser and Loughlin, the Sheiks were given a rough ride in trying to get through on Holmes.
A nice passage from the Stanley Cup finals where a big hit on Morenz leads to a goal for his team and he draws a Coutu penalty too:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, March 24, 1925
Morenz gave the fans a thrill with some fast skating. Halderson stopped him hard. Coutu came back and kicked at Halderson. Walker scored and was immediately thrown into the boards. Coutu penalized.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Daily Colonist, 3/31/1925
The Icelandic-Canadian duo of Frank Fredrickson and Harold Halderson were strong performers for the Cougars.
From the 1926 Cup Finals:

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times, 4/2/1926
The Middle Frame saw Victoria again away on the offensive with Halderson getting in some fine work. He prepared his attacks on the Montreal net, only to find Benedict still doing business.

Victoria launched another major offensive with Halderson leading their rushes...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
Slim Halderson was throwing his weight around quite a bit but he found the Montreal defense ready for him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
Slim Halderson featured with his rugged play which did not please the Montreal fans.
From the NHL:

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times, 12/1/1926
Siebert cleared a dangerous attack and rushed. the crowd booed when Halderson stepped into him.

Halderson relieved a rush and coasted through the Montreal defense and caught Benedict napping to make it 4-0.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times, 12/20/1926
The Cook brothers started attacks of their own account, but the defense of Halderson, Loughlin and Holmes was too strong.

Halderson, ******* and Frederickson all staged flashing plays for Detroit in the first overtime period, and the action was often in the Ranger territory.
Post-NHL, showing that he was indeed a very good player those years:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Evening Tribune, March 6, 1928
Captain Slim Halderson of the Beavers is now playing stunning hockey and is proving an inspiration to his mates. Halderson was a bit slow in hitting his stride. Right now, however, he is one of the outstanding performers in the league, a real power on both the offense and defense.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-02-2013 at 01:56 AM.
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Old
08-01-2013, 03:53 AM
  #128
seventieslord
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Walter Smaill, D/F



On a per-game basis, Smaill appears to have been just as good as other back-and-forth players of the time, such as Goldie Prodger and Ken Randall, only he had a shorter career. He played 13 seasons until age 32, while Prodger and Randall's careers spanned 15 and 18 years, to ages 34 and 39.

- 5'10", 180 lbs.
- Stanley Cup (1908, 1909)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1914)
- According to the Trail, LW from 1905-1907, D from 1908-1909, RW in 1910, LW in 1911, D in 1912, RW from 1913-1915, D in 1916
- Based on the above, best percentage scores: 64, 41, 38, 36, 33, 33
- Based on the above, best defense percentage scores: 100, 83, 44, 39
- However, Iain Fyffe's research has Smaill's career GP as 40% CP, 30% rover, 20% point and 10% wing (both L and R).
- Translated to more modern positions, that is 60% D, 30% C, 10% wing
- This would mean that in at least a couple of seasons that appear offensively pedestrian, the reason was that he was actually a blueliner
- 6th, 9th & 9th in ECAHA scoring (1906, 1907, 1909)
- 2nd & 1st in EC(A)HA defense scoring (1908, 1909) - behind Cyclone by 1 point, then tied with Cyclone
- 3rd in PCHA defense scoring (1912) - behind only the Patricks
- 6th in NHA defense scoring (1916) - behind Ross, Cleghorn, Cameron, Prodger, Corbeau
- ECHA 1st All-Star Team (1909)
- PCHA 2nd Team All-Star (1914)
- Was sent three times to New York to play in the All-star games between Eastern and Western stars. Scored 7 goals in these 6 competitive games.
- 104 goals, 17 assists, 121 points, 248 PIMs in 144 games.
- 6 goals, 13 PIMs in 11 Stanley Cup games.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
There are some players who, far better than average, didn't quite reach the category of being stars by leading the scorers, setting records or winning important games. Nonetheless, they played good hockey and gave balance in their team play. Such a player was Walter Smaill.

At the outset he was a forward and was a fair scorer with a weak Montral team on a line with (removed names of never-before-drafted scrubs).

The champion Wanderers thought him good enough to sign for the 1908 season and he played defense with Art Ross for two years... Smaill helped the Wanderers defend the cup against Edmonton... he was with a championship team in Victoria but they lost out in the Stanley Cup series... he returned east to rejoin the wanderers. He played as a substitute until Sprague Cleghorn badly sprained an ankle and was forced out of action. Smaill and Odie Cleghorn then teamed together as the Wanderer defense for the balance of the season.
Smaill was a good and rough player in the well-chronicled 1910 NHA season:

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Renfrew Millionaires
(page 84) And wasn't that some check thrown by Smaill on Patrick earlier in the game?

(page 92) Perhaps smarting from the attack by Smaill in the first home game, Frank Patrick was aware that he would again be the subject of heavy checking.

(page 128) Cobalt had lost its best player, Smaill...
In 1912, when the Patricks were raiding the NHA for players, Smaill was considered one of the brightest stars:

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Patricks: Hockey's Royal Family
It was further reported that some of the brightest stars had already been signed, including Percy Lesueur, Fred Lake, and Walter Smaill, from Ottawa; Pud Glass and Moose Johnson from Wanderers, and Cyclone Taylor of the Renfrew Millionaires.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, January 14, 1908
The playing of Smaill proved a fortunate move for the Wanderers. He was not very prominent in the first half, but in the second, when the team had to brace up or be beaten, he played in fine form and scored three of the seven goals for his team... Smaill showed some great bursts of speed in this half.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Press, March 19, 1908
Ross and Smaill, two sturdy defensemen...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, January 7, 1909
The end came unexpectedly after a face on Ottawa's side of the ice... Smaill secured the rubber, spun around in a circle from the side of the center about quarter ice and then let fly a long one, outside the whole Ottawa defense. It passed Taylor and Lake. LeSueur made a grab to stop it with his hand. Just the edge of his glove touched it and the umpire's hand went up signalling that the Wanderers had won the match.

Wanderers have been termed a lucky team; luck is with the winners every time for sure, and Wanderers have had likely nothing more than their share of it. But if Wanderers as a team are lucky, it is Walter Smaill who carries the horseshoes for the seven. The goal that Smaill netted in the overtime last night was the fourth that he has scored in the last two years, saving the day for the champions. it was Smaill who turned the tide each time against Ottawa, against Victorias and against Shamrocks last winter.
AND! Some never before seen quotes on Smaill, suggesting he was very fast and strong defensively, he was actually known as a "utility player", that he really was known as a good defenseman in the east, that he was extremely resilient, and that by 1911 he had already earned a reputation as a very clutch scorer - and that was three years before he scored the PCHA title winning goal!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Empire Of Ice: The Rise and Fall of the PCHA, 1911-1926
He could play any position, was very fast, and was a great backchecker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Daily Herald, February 18, 1914
WALTER SMAILL CAPTURES CHAMPIONSHIP FOR HIS TEAM AFTER HARD GAME – Former Ottawa star slips puck through – Victoria champions for second time - Small won the coast championship with a hard shot after seven minutes’ overtime.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, January 5, 1911
Walter Smaill of the Wanderers is probably the greatest “pinch” scorer playing hockey today… Small has a unique record in pulling teams from behind. Three years ago he played for Wanderers and scored when but five minutes remained to play the goal that robbed Ottawa of a chance to win the Stanley Cup. The following season, in that famous overtime game it was a shot from his stick that fooled LeSueur and won it for the Wanderers. Subsequently, he broke a tie game with the Shamrocks. On Wednesday, with Wanderers staring defeat in the face, they threw Smaill into the brecah… Smaill was practically responsible for the goal that put Wanderers ahead and it was also he who notched the sixth, making it safe. Smaill, fortunately, can combine a great shot with speed and especially good defense tactics. Wanderers are indeed lucky to have such an aggressive utility man.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leader-Post, February 5, 1963
By the time he retired from hockey in 1916, Smaill was reputed to have the most stitches in his head of any player of the day – 350. He had fractured his skull twice, the second time a year before he left the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westmount News, December 17, 1909
It is with regret that local hockey supporters learn of the departure of Walter Smaill, popular Wanderer player, who, along with Art Ross and Riley Hern, formed the most formidable defense in hockey at the Arena last winter… Although Smaill was considered one of the best hockey men on the ice ever since he started to play the game, his fame as an expert hockey player came with a rush when he started to handle the stick for the Wanderers in ’07, and is at present time rated as one of the best men playing hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Daily Herald, February 27, 1913
Although one of the most effective wingmen this season, it was as a defense player that Walter made his reputation, and his name is one to conjure with back east.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Daily Gazette, August 30, 1911
Walter Smaill, the lightning left wing of the Wanderers


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08-01-2013, 04:14 AM
  #129
seventieslord
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Orest Kindrachuk, C



- 5'10", 175 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1974, 1975)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1976)
- Best ES points percentages: 62, 58, 49, 47, 42, 40
- Killed 26% of penalties for teams 9% better than average
- Pittsburgh Penguins Captain (1978-1981)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Orest Kindrachuk was one of the more underrated players in the National Hockey League during the 1970's.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The Philadelphia Flyers did a little more homework than the rest of the league, and were rewarded when they eventually signed him as a free agent in July, 1971. They were impressed with Orest's stellar junior career with the Saskatoon Blades (WCJHL) where he scored 263 points in 164 games. He led the league in assists (100) his last year there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orest Kindrachuk
I was playing in the commercial league when I started thinking that I could always go back to school. Chronologically, I would not always be young and in top shape to play hockey so I decided to give it a try. Eventually, the Flyers invited me to their training camp. What is crazy is that if I would have played my draft year I might have been selected fairly high then I may never had the opportunity to play for the Flyers and be on a Stanley Cup-winning team. Things really fell into place for me. Call it destiny.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
By 1973-74 Kindrachuk was given a promotion to the National Hockey League. The timing couldn't have been better, as Orest would spend his first two NHL seasons as a Stanley Cup champion.

Orest played an unspectacular role on the Flyers but was a very important part of their team when they won the Cup in 1974 and 1975. He was not the fastest skater around but he was a tenacious checker who was strong on both ends of the ice. A strong penalty killer, he was mostly a center but occasionally played as a left wing.

His coach in Philadelphia, Fred Shero, liked him a lot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Shero
He was the kind of player you wanted out there in the tough situations because he had both the brains and guts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Kindrachuk's most regular linemates were tough guys Dave "Hammer" Schultz and Don "Big Bird" Saleski.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orest Kindrachuk
A lot of times when we would go on the road our line would have to play against our opponent’s top line. The three of us were plus players. We could keep up with anybody. We were actually a very good line
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Orest's best season in the NHL came during the 1975-76 season when he had 75 points including 26 goals, this despite playing on the 3rd line. He played some very solid hockey in Philadelphia even though he was bothered by a chronic back ailment for much of his career.

Orest was eventually traded to Pittsburgh together with Tom Bladon and Ross Lonsberry for Pittsburgh's 1st round draft choice in 1978. He was immediately named the Penguins captain in training camp and held that position for his entire stay in Pittsburgh.

He had a very fine first season in Steel City, scoring 60 points. Unfortunately he ran into a hip point injury problem in the 1979-80 season, but still managed to score a respectable 46 points in 52 games.

Orest was definitely one of the unsung heroes of the 1970's who never got the headlines but who always did a very fine job. He scored a total of 379 pts in 508 games as well as 40 points in 76 games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
A solid playmaking centre who could play defence and kill penalties, Orest Kindrachuk played over 500 games for three different NHL teams. He topped the 30-assist mark five times in his career and was dangerous on the powerplay and while shorthanded.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
As a rookie in 1973-74 he scored 41 points as the third centre behind Bobby Clarke and Rick MacLeish. The youngster was solid in the playoffs and helped the Flyers become the first expansion team to win the Stanley Cup. In 1974-75 he missed 20 games due to an injury but was a solid checker in playoffs as Philly repeated as Stanley Cup champions.

By 1975-76, Kindrachuk assumed a more prominent role. In addition to checking and killing penalties, he provided offence and was used as a playmaker on the power play. He set career highs of 26 goals and 75 points then returned to more of a checking role in next two years. During this period he occupied one of the safest places in hockey as the pivot for tough wingers Don Saleski and Dave Schultz.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Star, April 10th, 1974
Orest Kindrachuk is not concerned with what professional hockey scouts thought of him three years ago when he graduated from the junior ranks. He's in the National Hockey League now and Philadelphia Flyers are the benefactors. Kindrachuk, known primarily for his checking ability and aggressive play, scored two goals as the Flyers downed the visiting Flames 4-1 in the opener of their best-of-seven quarterfinal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Shero
He has moves and toughness, as long as he plays thus well, no one is going to take his job.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philadelphia Flyers Encyclopedia
Kindrachuk was a strong part of the "Broad Street Bullies" chemistry. In a situation similar to teammate Don Saleski, he eventually made the welcomed change from a brawler to a penalty killer and he could provide needed offense, too. Kindrachuk's gutsy play earned an assist on Bill Clement's 1975 Stanley Cup insurance goal, and "O" gave the Flyers more offensive depth in 1975-76 as his goal and point totals doubled those of the previous season. The work ethic and attitude of the heroes that provided the fans of the hard-working Philadelphia Flyers with consecutive Stanley Cup Championships will not be forgotten, and Orest Kindrachuk is no exception.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1976 O Pee Chee
Orest is a pesky type of checker who makes things happen when he's on the ice. He's somewhat overshadowed by the other big names on the team, but he's extremely effective.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976-77
moving out of “underrated” status. $4 scorer for Flyers last season… superb playmaker who would score more if he weren’t centering Flyers’ third line…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1977-78
one of the most unsung Flyers… often overshadowed by the exploits of such more publicized teammates… tenacious checker and man-in-motion skater.. excels as playmaking center and penalty killer… slick, quick skater with a knack for slipping through rival defenses…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1978-79
smart playmaking center who is quick to think and react… shifty skater who can easily shift through defense… persistent checker… has also played LW but still mostly center for 3rd line.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1979-80
One of Shero’s favourites from two Stanley Cup championships in Philadelphia… slow but so smart that you hardly notice… needed only three weeks of training camp to show new Pittsburgh teammates his leadership qualities and was named captain before playing a regular season game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1980-81
injuries reduced him to 52 games and the team missed his leadership and playmaking skill… not especially quick but he compensates with on-ice intelligence and creativity… strong both ways… was a strong worker on two Stanley Cup teams.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walk Together Forever
He was a smallish center, but hard-nosed and clever… “I was told by management that the players had voted me captain of the team”, he says proudly. “that was a great feeling to know that your peers had voted you the leader of the team. It gave me the opportunity to help get a team started, and there’s a great deal of satisfaction in that.” …He obviously thrived in his role.

He played in a career-high 79 games. The next year, he appeared in only 52. By 1979-80, he would be in the lineup for only 13. His decreasing activity had nothing to do with his performance. “one night, I got hit about five feet from the boards… it was one of those cross checks in the back where you are just far enough away to cause some damage. Today the player would be suspended for a few games, but back then it was just part of the game. From that point on, I never really recovered the way I should have” … “The Caps made me a nice deal, so I decided to go there. The mistake was they took me overseas for training camp and I wasn’t able to continue my workouts. That probably helped to end my career… I was having to walk down steps backwards the pain was so bad. I had enough. I felt very comfortable leaving the game… I had accomplished all I could for a guy with my talent and ability… The Caps wanted to have a retirement ceremony for me, but I declined. I came into the league quietly and now I am going to leave quietly.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Players and moments of the Philadelphia Flyers
”I remember Orest when he played Junior,” McNab recalled. “He was one of the few players who went up to the Flin Flon rink and wasn’t frightened by the junior bombers. Right then and there It was obvious that this kid was going to go places… Orest won faceoffs, he battled in the corners and he could even pop a few goals. I knew I’d never see him in the western league again. And I didn’t… They put him between Don Saleski and Dave Schultz and he helped make them better players.”

The result was a mixture of firecrackers and goals. Not that he played there all the time; Bill Clement and Terry Crisp altenated with the two terminators but Kindrachuk proved just as effective in a low-key way… “he deserved some kind of handicap, working between wingers lijke me and Saleski,” kidded Schultz.

“Orest had all the guts in the world,” said McNab.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-02-2013 at 01:59 AM.
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08-01-2013, 08:04 PM
  #130
BubbaBoot
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Darryl Sutter
head coach




• Born: August 18, 1958 • Viking, Alberta •
• Coached: 1992/93 - 1994/95 Chicago Blackhawks \\\ 1997/98 - 2002/03 San Jose Sharks \\\ 2002/03 - 2005/06 Calgary Flames \\\ 2011/12 - current Los Angeles Kings \\\ 1988/89 Saginaw hawks (IHL) \\\ 1989/90 Indianapolis Ice (IHL) •
• General Manager: Calgary Flames - 2003/04 - 2010/11 •

• Championships •
1990 • Turner Cup (IHL)
2012 • Stanley Cup (NHL)

• Coaching record •
• regular season
957 games | 461 wins | 349 losses | 101 ties | 46 OTL | .559 winning percentage
• playoffs
121 games | 63 wins | 58 losses | .521 winning percentage




• Accolades •

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiki

Sutter began his coaching career in the International Hockey League, where he coached the Saginaw Hawks and led the Indianapolis Ice to the Turner Cup.

He was the head coach of the Chicago Blackhawks for three seasons and also served as Chicago’s assistant coach in 1987-88 and as associate coach from 1990-92. He led Chicago to a first-place finish in the Norris Division—and the best record in the Campbell Conference—in 1992-93 with a 47-25-12 record (106 points), only to be swept in the opening round by their rivals the St. Louis Blues.

In the lockout shortened 1994-95 season he led Chicago to the Western Conference Finals.

Sutter was the head coach of the San Jose Sharks for parts of six seasons (1997-98 through the start of the 2002-03 season). He was relieved of his duties with the Sharks on December 1, 2002.[2]

Darryl became head coach of the Calgary Flames on December 28, 2002. The following April, he would assume the role of GM in addition to his coaching duties.

In 2003-2004, his first full season in Calgary, he would lead the team to a 42-30-7-3 record and to game 7 of the 2004 Stanley Cup Finals. This marked the first time in seven seasons that the Calgary Flames would make the post-season.

The Flames defeated the top three teams in the Western Conference that year (Vancouver, Detroit, and San Jose) en route to the Stanley Cup Finals where they would meet the Tampa Bay Lightning.
However, it would be the Lightning who would emerge as champions, beating Calgary by a score of 2-1. Craig Conroy scored the lone goal for the Flames.

On July 12, 2006, Sutter stepped down as the Flames head coach. He has said that he found it difficult to handle the jobs of both head coach and GM of the Flames. Sutter compiled a 107–73–26 record in two-plus seasons behind the Calgary bench, joining the Flames after head coaching stints in Chicago and San Jose. The Flames promoted Jim Playfair as Sutter's replacement, but after a first-round loss to the Detroit Red Wings in 2006–07, Sutter hired Mike Keenan as head coach, with Playfair stepping back into an associate coaching role. Keenan was fired a month after the Flames were eliminated from the 2008–09 NHL playoffs at the hands of the Blackhawks.

Brent Sutter, former coach of the New Jersey Devils, was selected as the new Flames coach in June 2009. On December 28, 2010, Sutter resigned as the General Manager of the Calgary Flames.

On December 17, 2011, the Kings hired Sutter mid-season as head coach, after the dismissal of his predecessor Terry Murray.[3] His first game with the Kings was a December 22, 2011, shootout victory over rival Anaheim Ducks. Sutter led the Kings to a 25-13-11 mark in 49 games, finished third in the Pacific Division, and entered the playoffs as the 8th seed in the Western Conference.

In the playoffs, they beat the 1st seed Vancouver Canucks, 2nd seed St. Louis Blues, and 3rd seed Phoenix Coyotes to advance to the Stanley Cup Finals, the only team to accomplish that feat in the 119 year history of the Stanley Cup Finals. The Kings went on to defeat the New Jersey Devils, 4 games to 2 to give LA their first Stanley Cup in the 45 year history of the franchise. The Kings set several records during the playoffs winning 10 straight games on the road, and being the first team to go 3-0 in each of their playoff series
Quote:
Originally Posted by L.A. Kings / NHL.com

Darryl Sutter is in his second season as Head Coach and his first full season after being hired on December 20, 2011. Last year he helped lead the Kings to the franchise’s first Stanley Cup championship as the team went 16-4 in the postseason and, prior to that, 25-13-11 in the regular season with him behind the bench.

Sutter, the 24th head coach in Kings history, came to the Kings with a wealth of NHL experience. His teams have eclipsed the 40-win mark five times, 100 points twice and his clubs have finished in first place three times. He is also only one of nine head coaches in NHL history to lead three different teams to 100 wins. Sutter’s teams have qualified for the postseason 11 of his 12 seasons.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Globe and Mail

Bernie Nicholls, a long-time associate of Sutter, who played for him with the Chicago Blackhawks and San Jose Sharks, laughs uproariously as he retells the story about Commuter Darryl.

“It’s funny,” Nicholls said, “but you get that way – and I don’t know who wouldn’t. People, when they do something and it’s successful, you keep doing it.”

In fairness, superstitions are rarely rooted in cold, hard logic and maybe a better description is Sutter is a slave to routine and repetition. It is a linchpin of his coaching philosophy, which is why he gets so animated when talking about travel and game times and days off and recovery: all factors beyond the standards Xs and Os he believes are vital to success.

“When Darryl got here, one of the first things he said was, ‘I’m not a video guy,’ “ Nicholls said as the Kings prepared to open the Stanley Cup final series Wednesday against the New Jersey Devils. “Geez, these guys do more video than when Roger Neilson was coaching. But it’s all teaching.

“You know we had that NHL 36 [TV show] Darryl wouldn’t let them in the dressing because he hates cameras, but I really wish he would have let them in to see him go, because he’s amazing. I don’t think people realize how smart he really is. … He’s taught these guys so much, and he’s so prepared. He doesn’t let one thing get by him.

“Right now, [the players]feel like they can’t lose – and that’s how you want to be.”

Sutter joined the Kings last December, after the Kings had fallen to 12th place in the Western Conference and general manager Dean Lombardi reluctantly showed Murray the door.

So far in these playoffs, just about everything has fallen into place for the Kings. They are 12-2 and dispatched the West’s three divisional champions –Vancouver Canucks, St. Louis Blues and Phoenix Coyotes – to qualify for only the second Stanley Cup final appearance in franchise history.

According to Kings centre Jarret Stoll, the reality of Darryl Sutter doesn’t accurately match the reputation.

Yes, Sutter can be a hard-and-demanding coach. No, he is not a screamer. The biggest issue for Kings players the first month was understanding Sutter’s instructions because the timbre of his voice is often so low.

“I would just say he’s very honest,” Stoll said. “That’s all. He’s just very honest. But he doesn’t miss anything. So you can’t go out there and think you’re working hard, or think you’re doing the right thing, because if you’re not, or you’re out of position, or you make a bad read, he’ll tell you. But you respect a guy like that because he’s just telling it the way it is.”

One of the things that keeps Sutter connected to the modern generation of players is he has children roughly the same age. His son, Brett, plays in the Carolina Hurricanes organization and got into 15 NHL games this season. Another son, Christopher, graduates from high school in Calgary this spring.

“He almost treats us as his own kids,” Stoll said. “He’ll tap you on the arm and he’ll say, ‘How are you doing today? Everything okay? How’s your family?’ “He cares. He really cares.”

Two of Sutter’s younger brothers, Brent and Duane, have their names on the Stanley Cup with the New York Islanders in the early 1980s. No one in the family has had a chance to do it since.

Sutter doesn’t talk like to talk about winning the Stanley Cup – just another one of those crazy hockey superstitions – but you know that it would mean the world to him to get his name on there as well.

“Trust me, every one of the guys in the room understands that,” Stoll said. “It’s one of my reasons – one of them – to see a guy like that win. It would be pretty special.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Star

When Los Angeles Kings coach Darryl Sutter speaks, he’s sometimes hard to understand. He’s a tad soft-spoken, uttering sentences in low tones, prone to mumbling.

“I had no idea what he was saying when he first came here,” said defenceman Drew Doughty.
Players noticed this almost immediately and — not wanting to get in the coach’s bad books early in his tenure — they devised their own plans on how to handle it.

“I was making sure to sit at the back and see the other guys run the play before me, so I didn’t mess up,” said Doughty. “If you’re making mistakes in practice, he’s going to get on you.”
Anze Kopitar’s solution: “You just want to make sure you get pretty close to him.”

Justin Williams — who says every player on the team has a Sutter impersonation — has developed a sixth sense.

“Sometimes, even on the bench, he’ll mumble to himself,” said Williams. “But you know when he’s talking about you.”

If one thing is clear — regardless how he sends it — Sutter’s message has gotten through to the Kings.

Sutter took a timid, mistake-prone, low-scoring team and turned them into an aggressive, devil-may-care, slightly-not-as-low-scoring team.

Since Sutter took over from Terry Murray in mid-December, the Kings have gone 37-19-7, including this incredible 12-2 run in the post-season that has landed Los Angeles in the Stanley Cup final for just the second time in franchise history. Game 1 against the New Jersey Devils is here on Wednesday night.

“We had some young players,” said veteran defenceman Willie Mitchell. “They need some better preparation, some better focus, especially in this market.

“He makes sure everyone is prepared and ready to go. You see the intensity in him, his passion, it rubs off on everybody. Like a CEO in any company, if he has passion it rubs off on everybody.”

The Kings also managed to knock off the first, second and third seeds in the West — in order. Only one other team has knocked off the top three seeds, albeit in a different order: the 2004 Calgary Flames, coached by Sutter.

“Everybody makes a big deal of that,” said Sutter. “Quite honestly, I’ve had better teams after that and we lost in the first round, so, you know what, that’s how close it is.”

Sutter is self-effacing. Tell him everyone calls him a player’s coach, and he almost blushes.
“I wish I was a player, not a coach,” said Sutter. “I keep telling these guys, they don’t know how lucky they are now. Geez. It’s awesome for them.


“I don’t like talking about it. What’s publicly said or not said is good. It’s not about me or the staff. It’s about everybody. That’s what’s important. Everybody plays hard and has fun, what more do you want.”

The aw-shucks demeanor aside, players say he’s got a sarcastic streak. Nothing mean, nothing personal.

“He’ll just say: ‘Is this game too hard for you tonight?’” said Williams. “Just to get you angry. He knows what makes hockey players angry.

“He holds the players to a standard that he thinks we should be at all the time. He knows the right time to be relaxed. He knows the right time when the team is feeling good about themselves and he brings us down a little bit. He just makes sure and pushes the buttons to make sure we’re ready.”

When Sutter came in — this no-nonsense Alberta cattle rancher — the first thing he did was make the Kings believe they were better than their record by telling them they were better.

“He is an intense guy,” said Matthew Lombardi, a centre with the Leafs who broke into the league with Sutter’s Flames in 2003. “He wants to get the max out as much as he can (with) each player.

“He expects every guy on the team to bring what he can bring. He knows how to do that. He expects you to do better than the guy you’re playing against.”


Lombardi was on that 2004 Flames team — a sixth seed that made its unlikely run to the Cup final.
“Everyone bought into their own roles,” said Lombardi. “That’s really key. That’s how he coaches: he expects the guys who can score to score, he expects the checkers to check, and guys buy into their role and every guy in our team played a part in winning.”

But there’s more to it than that. Kings GM Dean Lombardi — no relation to the Leaf player — remembers a point about 20 games into Sutter’s tenure when things didn’t really look much better. The Kings still had trouble scoring.

“He blamed himself,” Dean Lombardi said of Sutter. “He said he should have seen this sooner. He showed me what he was going to do on the board, the changes he was going to make systematically.

“It was just really, a guy with his experience, he’s beating himself up: ‘This is my fault. It should have never got this far. We’ve got to make this adjustment.’ I found it amazing he was blaming himself.”

The Kings switched styles, to the two-man forecheck that has — since installed — produced more offence and taken the pressure off Jonathan Quick to get a shutout every game. The switch worked. The forecheck pins opponents, creating turnovers, giving the Kings more chances, and more goals.

Dean Lombardi said Sutter was the natural choice once he decided on a coaching change in December. The two had worked together in San Jose.

“He never forgets players win,” said Dean Lombardi. “It’s about players. He’s very much a player’s coach. The players that played for him when I hired him, how many texts I got from them. These are guys you want on your team, who admire him and still thank him for making (them) better.
“Athletes have changed. But I think deep down, they still want to be pushed and they still want to be the best they can be. We put so much around them now, it’s easy to take the easy way. He doesn’t allow that.”

And as a motivator, there’s no one like Sutter, says Kings captain Dustin Brown.

“He made sure we’re attached to the games, getting into it from an emotional standpoint,” said Brown. “It’s hard to play game 55 of the regular season if you’re not emotionally attached to it.
“He’s an honest guy. If you’re playing like crap, he’s going to tell you. If you’re playing good, he’ll pat you on the back.

“Anyone can respect that. That’s why players play for him.”


• Playing career •
• regular season
406 games | 161 goals | 118 assists | 279 points | 288 PIMs | -10 | 42 PP | 3 SH | 0.60 points/game
• playoffs
51 games | 24 goals | 19 assist | 43 points | 26 PIMs | +4 | 6 PP | 0 SH | 0.84 points/game

1 40 goal season / 1 30+ goal season / 3 20+ goal seasons / 18.4 shooting percentage (8th all-time NHL)



Last edited by BubbaBoot: 08-01-2013 at 11:49 PM.
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08-02-2013, 01:49 AM
  #131
seventieslord
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Martin Straka, F



-5’9”, 180 lbs
- Placed 4th, 12th in points (2001, 1999)
- Best points percentages: 99, 78, 72, 63, 61, 57
- Killed 15% of his team’s penalties in his career
- Can play all three forward positions and the point on the PP
- Played roughly 50% LW, 35% C, 15% RW
- 717 points in 954 games
- 70 points in 106 playoff games
- Olympic Gold (1998)
- 33 points in 48 major international games in 8 tournaments
- Includes 14 points in 20 games in 4 best-on-best tournaments
- remains active in the Czech league, finishing 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th in points in the last 5 seasons


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1994-95
an outstanding finesse player, Straka relies on his skating and hockey sense to create scoring opportunities where lesser players might simply resort to a dump-and-chase tactic. A good passer, he knows how to go to the net and how to hold onto the puck when he’s deep in the opponent’s zone. He’ll hover behind the net, Gretzky style, and look for an outlet in front. Very patient, he has tremendous poise and confidence.

He could shoot more and get more involved. It wouldn’t hurt if he improved his strength, the better to win the battles for the puck in traffic… has quickly developed into one of the Pens’ quiet heroes, scoring his share of goals and holding up his part of the bargain with his teammates, who share his work ethic but not all of whom have his raw ability with the puck. He is among the team’s top 5-6 skill players and the Pens will look to him to continue to improve and develop.

WILL – be an impact NHLer
CANT – be too patient
EXPECT – rapid rise to stardom
DON’T EXPECT – a physical player
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1995-96
He is very food at losing his check in the neutral zone and finding open ice for a pass or shot… a blue chip player, scoring his share of goals and holding up his part of the bargain in both ends of the rink. He is the third young offensive prospect to come to the sens, along with Daigle and Yashin… may prove to be the most productive of the three.

WILL – have to prove himself
CANT – let draft status hinder
EXPECT – steady improvement
DON’T EXPECT – an intense player
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996-97
A terrific skater, Straka has all the ability in the world, if he can apply it consistently… he can fill the net with his hard shot and great hands, but he has to get motivated for every game… to become expendable in Ottawa and Long Island is a sad testament to his lack of fire. He has proven that his lack of size is not a hindrance. But he hasn’t yet shown that he has the heart to play an 80-game schedule… has more sheer talent than half his teammates, yet is outplayed by them on a regular basis… can be as good as he wants to be.

WILL – have to score more
CANT – delay emergence
EXPECT – ample skill
DON’T EXPECT – burning desire
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1993-94
a speedy little center, a waterbug with imagination. He makes clever little passes that always land on tape and give the recipient time to do something with it. He’s more of a playmaker than a shooter and will have to learn to go to the net more to make his game less predictable. Straka has confidence in his finesse skills. He needs to adjust to smaller ice surfaces. Though he’s a speedy skater who is tough to knock off balance, he is not very strong and can get muscled off the puck in close quarters.

Straka has shown little inclination for the typical North American style of play. He is small and avoids corners and walls, and will have to be teamed with more physical linemates to give him some room… has the raw talent to be an impact player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1994-95
was able to adjust to smaller North American ice surfaces because of his ability to stop and start. He doesn’t have the outside speed to burn defenders but creates space for himself with his wheeling in tight spaces. He has good balance and is tough to knock off his feet even though he isn’t very big.

Not a great defensive player, Straka is good five-on-five. He’s an offensive threat every time he steps on the ice… has to learn to protect the puck better with his body and buy some time…
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 1994-95
blossomed in sophomore year thanks to absence of Mario Lemieux. Fleet skater with an excellent ****. Finesse style was ineffective during the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1995-96
He draws people to him and creates open space for his linemates… he complemented Radek Bonk well… after a strong rookie season, he saw surprisingly little ice time with the Penguins prior to his trade…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
always highly productive for a week or two, then vanishes. His game is a major tease, because when on he can do a lot of things… doesn’t bring much else to the ice when he’s in one of his funks… frustratingly inconsistent… was benched repeatedly in the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 1996-97
an astute pickup by the Sens… a quick, finesse-type player with an excellent shot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1996-97
never really got over his chronic homesickness… was puton waivers by the Isles, and before that, didn’t really do it for the Senators – the two worst teams in the East!... has talent, but he’s unpredictable at best.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
shows second line skills and fourth line consistency… a no-impact player who could score 40 of the quietest points in the NHL.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
he’ll score goals in bunches, but then play 15 games without a goal, as he did last season…
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 1998-99
Panther discard, signed as a free agent, emerged as the most consistent player among Pens’ reconstructed support staff. Quick, crafty and hard working, he became a key penalty killer and is versatile enough to play anywhere.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1999-00
has finally achieved a level of consistency that matches his skills… he is a perpetual threat… may have finally found a home on a Pittsburgh team that employs a very European style of attack… erased the negatives with a strong regular season and playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1999-00
set personal highs while playing the best two-way hockey of his life… a very good skater who is extremely shifty… undersized and not a physical player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 1999-00
Arguably the league’s biggest revelation… delivered a textbook contrac year… versatile… compensates for lack of size with excellent quickness, tenacity and puck skills… a constant shorthanded threat, was also top-ten in even strength production.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2000-01
one of the Pens’ most important players. Creative and elusive, he is Pittsburgh’s version of the energizer bunny… straka’s best work comes when killing penalties.. in his second stint with the team, he has become the team’s hardest-working forward… can line up at LW or center.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000-01
fell off his point-a-game pace. That could have something to do with his shift from center to LW. He likes the open ice at center much better.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 2000-01
although undersized and not much of a physical factor, he does however have good offensive skills and creates plenty of scoring chances with his exceptional speed and hustle… played very well in the postseason.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001-02
Straka has elite skills that he applies with the work ethic of a 3rd line grinder. The only thing that keeps from being in the same class as a Jagr or Bure is his shot, which isn’t in the same class as his skating oh hockey sense. Most of his goals come from breakaways, where Straka uses his speed, or by pounsing on loose pucks and rebounds. He plays the left point on the PP not because of his shot, but because of his heady puck movement… can intimidate with his speed to hurry a defender into a giveaway… thrived when moved to the left side… was one of the few Penguins who showed up in the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 2001-02
was pens’ most consistent forward… versatilr and energetic lightweight with terrific speed and determination.. hits top gear quickly and is a crafty playmaker who continually providesd his team with an on offensive spark when it was needed, while coming within a point of winning the assist title.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2001-02
was arguably the pens’ most consistent player… all about quick bursts into the offensive zone and boundless energy all over the ice… has adjusted well to playing LW, and displayed surprising durability… the team’s most dangerous player while shorthanded.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002-03
things don’t get much tougher for a player than they did for Straka last season… had 9 points in 11 games, then broke his leg. Played in one game after that injury, and was hit in the face. Came back from the broken face, and reinjured his broken leg. It was a devastating year for Straka, who was coming off a career year… the beating he took last season may cost him speed and agility and could affect him mentally as well… can play center or LW.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2002-03
everything that could go wrong, did… a formidable penalty killer and better-than-average offensive creator. Lacks natural finish but can score off the rush and also contribute from the point on the PP.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 2002-03
after last year’s hampering misfortunes, it remains to be seen if he can rekindle the same fearless intensity that is a trademark of his game
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2003-04
one of the last valuable commodities on the Penguins, which makes him almost a sure bet to be traded.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2003-04
various unlucky injuries have bordered on the ridiculous…his all-around hustle and work ethic are contagious.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 2003-04
a crafty, effervescent playmaker, the undersized Straka is a quick, nimble skater whose game is built around his determination and knack for darting through traffic and creating space for his linemates, although he lacked his customary explosiveness lat season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2006-07
finally beat the injury bug… slowed down as the season wore on, though… at this point, best suited for second line and top PP unit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2007-08
once knocked for his durability, but has only missed five games in two years… experiencing a career renaissance on Broadway… spent most of the year alongside Jagr, though was taken off the big line late in the year… frequently plays the point on the PP.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen’s Hockey Pool Guide 2007-08
much tougher than he appears and won’t hesitate to crash high-traffic areas… versatility stood out last season as he began at LW before later being re-deployed as the #2 center.

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Old
08-14-2013, 11:55 AM
  #132
Wrigley
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Written by Dreakmur



Aleksander Kozhevnikov


Awards and Acchievements:
Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame (1982)
2 x Olympic Gold Medalist (1984, 1988)
World Championship Gold Medalist (1982)
World Junior Championship Gold Medalist (1978)

Scoring Accompishments:
Points – 2nd(1982), 2nd(1983), 5th(1984), 6th(1988)
Goals – 1st(1982), 2nd(1983), 3rd(1984), 4th(1988)
Assists – 6th(1982), 6th(1983), 8th(1988)

1982 World Championship – 3rd in Goals, 2nd on Soviet Team
1984 Olympics – 11th in Points, 3rd on Soviet Team

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
Despite his sedond-place standing in the scoring race, Aleksander Kozhevnikov didn't get an invite to these (1983) championships. He was in the hockey doghouse again. All one had to do was look at Kohevnikov to know that he and the Stalinists would not hit it off. He was lanky, unshaven; his hair shot all over the place and his eyes had an independent, challenging glare. Concomitant with the look was his playing style - rugged, fearless, tempermenta, and uncolonial. He yelled at team-mates, fought with opponents, paid little heed to practice times or cerfews and stole away from the training-camp barracks at every opportunity. That he got as far as he did was a testimony to his dramatic skill with the puck and a bull's-eye shot.
How good was his peak?
1982: Kozhevnikov probably should have been the Soviet league MVP. He had 71 points to Makarov’s 75, but he had 43 goals to Makarov’s 32. He also didn’t have the support of the Green Unit.

1983: Makarov was hurt, and missed about 1/3 of the season, so we’ll account for that. His 25 goals would have been 33 in a full season. Kozhevnikov had 35. Makarov’s 42 points would have been 56. Kozhevnikov had 57.

1984: Kuzhevnikov was hurt, and missed about ¼ of the season, so we’ll account for that as well. Kozhevnikov’s 47 points becomes 59. Makarov has 73. Kozhevnikov’s 33 goals become 41. Makarov had 36. This was probably the Green Unit’s most dominant year – CSKA took 1-4 in the scoring race. Kozhevnikov was 5th.

1988: Makarov had 23 goals to Kozhevnikov’s 25. Makarov, however, did have 68 points to Kozhevniko’s 45. This was another extremely dominant season for CSKA – on the point leader-board, they had 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8. Considering Kozhevnikov played with very mediocre line mates, the gap in points doesn’t seem too bad. I can easily get away with naming his top-scoring team mates, since they’ll never be drafted anyway: Ivan Avdeyev and Sergei Kharin.


Obviously, Makarov was able to maintain this pace for 10 years, and Kozhevnikov kind of fizzled out for a while. He had another excellent season in 1988, when he carried a Krylja Sovetov team into second place. Considering teams and linemates, I think it's very fair to say that Kozhevnikov was among the very elite in the USSR.

Written by Dreakmur

__________________


I see a line of cars and they’re all painted black, With flowers and my love, both never to come back, I see people turn their heads and quickly look away, Like a new born baby, it just happens every day
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10-27-2013, 12:57 PM
  #133
VanIslander
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Might as well add some AAA 2013 bios to this thread (for Master Bio Thread consideration).

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10-27-2013, 12:58 PM
  #134
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Sergei Babinov, the fast-skating, hard-hitting defensive defenseman for the Soviet national team in 162 international games from 1975 to 1984, including six world championship medals four of which were gold. He was a "star defenseman" according to several sources and it wasn't for scoring as he rarely put the puck in the net. What he did was skate quickly to defend, with grit and toughness, and made passes to others leaving the defensive zone. He was 21 in the 1976 Canada Cup on the Bronze medal team but was in the prime of his career in winning the 1979 Challenge Cup over NHLers and then was victorious in the 1981 Canada Cup. He also was in on nine Soviet league championships over a 452-game career with the Red Army.



Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
...the marvelously mobile Sergei Babinov...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Windsor Star, May 3, 1977
... star Sergei Babinov... muscular and aggressive...

Quote:
Originally Posted by in Al Strachan's Go to the Net
In 1972, all the bodychecking had been one way: Canadians gave, Soviets took. But now the Soviets, especially defencemen like Sergei Babinov, were capable of administering the occasional crunching body check
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty Bowman
"He is about as close to our style as any of their defencemen. ... He's chunky, a Leo Boivin style. He likes to hit people and he gives the puck to his partner a lot rather than control the play.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Evening News, Jan 7, 1986
In addition to the vaunted speed, passing and shooting abilities of the Soviets, they have added another element: ruggedness. Ron Caron, director of hockey operations for the Blues, noticed.

"This is the best I have seen the Russians perform," said Caron "And they could last a long time because they can skate!"

"I saw defenseman Sergei Babinov drop three Canadiens in about eight seconds. First, Bob Gainey, who's a tough guy, went to clash with Babinov and went down on his fanny. Then, Guy Carbonneau tried to pick up the play and Babinov dropped him.

"Then, (Chris) Nilan said, 'Come see me,' "added Caron, referring to the Canadiens enforcer. "Babinov dropped him with a body check along the boards
. They went at it and Babinov got two minutes for roughing and Nilan got four minutes for roughing and high-sticking. And it cost Montreal a goal."


Quote:
Originally Posted by The Weekend Sun, Apr 15, 1981
The Soviets have brought along a bunch of magnificently skilled, swift-skating youngsters, anchored by such brilliant veterans as Vladimir Petrov, Alexandr Maltsev, Valeri Vasiliev, Sergei Babinov, Vachislav Fetisov, Sergei Makarov and Vasily Pervukin.
and more in Billyshoe1721's bio from MLD 2012: http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...1&postcount=47

Babinov was twice before in the ATD and I believe he could deservingly be there in a third pairing role. Sergei Babinov, the fast-skating, hard-hitting defensive defenseman for the Soviet national team in 162 international games from 1975 to 1984, including six world championship medals four of which were gold. He was a "star defenseman" according to several sources and it wasn't for scoring as he rarely put the puck in the net. What he did was skate quickly to defend, with grit and toughness, and made passes to others leaving the defensive zone. He was 21 in the 1976 Canada Cup on the Bronze medal team but was in the prime of his career in winning the 1979 Challenge Cup over NHLers and then was victorious in the 1981 Canada Cup. He also was in on nine Soviet league championships over a 452-game career with the Red Army.



Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
...the marvelously mobile Sergei Babinov...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Windsor Star, May 3, 1977
... star Sergei Babinov... muscular and aggressive...

Quote:
Originally Posted by in Al Strachan's Go to the Net
In 1972, all the bodychecking had been one way: Canadians gave, Soviets took. But now the Soviets, especially defencemen like Sergei Babinov, were capable of administering the occasional crunching body check
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty Bowman
"He is about as close to our style as any of their defencemen. ... He's chunky, a Leo Boivin style. He likes to hit people and he gives the puck to his partner a lot rather than control the play.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Evening News, Jan 7, 1986
In addition to the vaunted speed, passing and shooting abilities of the Soviets, they have added another element: ruggedness. Ron Caron, director of hockey operations for the Blues, noticed.

"This is the best I have seen the Russians perform," said Caron "And they could last a long time because they can skate!"

"I saw defenseman Sergei Babinov drop three Canadiens in about eight seconds. First, Bob Gainey, who's a tough guy, went to clash with Babinov and went down on his fanny. Then, Guy Carbonneau tried to pick up the play and Babinov dropped him.

"Then, (Chris) Nilan said, 'Come see me,' "added Caron, referring to the Canadiens enforcer. "Babinov dropped him with a body check along the boards
. They went at it and Babinov got two minutes for roughing and Nilan got four minutes for roughing and high-sticking. And it cost Montreal a goal."


Quote:
Originally Posted by The Weekend Sun, Apr 15, 1981
The Soviets have brought along a bunch of magnificently skilled, swift-skating youngsters, anchored by such brilliant veterans as Vladimir Petrov, Alexandr Maltsev, Valeri Vasiliev, Sergei Babinov, Vachislav Fetisov, Sergei Makarov and Vasily Pervukin.
and more in Billyshoe1721's bio from MLD 2012: http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...1&postcount=47

Babinov was twice before in the ATD and I believe he could deservingly be there in a third pairing role.

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10-27-2013, 12:59 PM
  #135
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Leo Reise Sr., the rushing defenseman who has been described as spectacular and a star on the Americans toward the end of a career that bridged eras in hockey. After the NHA ended and through the beginnings of the NHL and rival WCHL/WHL years of the 1920's, Leo Reise was an impact player in the hockey world. He was 24 years old in 1917 when he joined the Hamilton Tigers of the OHA senior amateur league and became a goal scorer. He was a 2nd team all-star his first year, scored two goals in a playoff game against a Toronto team featuring Babe Dye en route to winning the Allan Cup his second year, was a 1st team all-star his third year and 2nd team all-star again his fourth year. Then Hamilton joined the NHL and he immediately had a career year finishing second in NHL assists in 1921-22 while continuing to score goals, finishing the season a point shy of a point per game, playing with Prodger and Malone. The following season Malone was gone, Reise was 30 years old and his assists dropped down from second in the NHL to third on the last-place team. He was 4th and 6th in NHL points among defensemen those two seasons. Reise wanted to leave the basement dwelling club and play in the west where he made more money for Saskatoon of the WCHL. He was 10th and 9th in points among defensemen and in the third year the team was in the WHL and he finished 6th in points among defensemen. The next season he went back to the NHL and was 5th in NHL points among defensmen. His second year back in the NHL he was fourth in team goals but the 35 year old would no longer put up significant assists or total points. He would go on to play two more full seasons, making the NHL playoffs for the first time as an over-the-hill veteran with the Americans in 1929 and Rangers in 1930, pointless in both postseasons, leaving the NHL thereafter at age 37 after seven full NHL seasons over the course of his career. He would play two more years of pro hockey in the IHL, described no longer as a speedy playmaker but, as "...this big powerful, broad-shouldered stalwart... is the dogged, steady plugger type".



Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
....an excellent skater and had a handy touch as a playmaker...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Press – February 26th, 1931
Leo Reise is regarded as one of the fastest skaters in hockey. He has beaten Howie Morenz the phantom of the Canadiens in speed contests they have engaged in.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddy Jones, editor of the Hamilton Herald
Under new environments he should dazzle the westerners with his flashy rushes.…

Reise played wonderful hockey for the Hamilton ‘pros’ last season and earned a steady job. His rushes featured almost every game. He often expressed a desire to be traded or sold to a western club, so, with his wish gratified, he should play sterling hockey for Saskatoon. Hamilton fans are sorry to see the the big boy go


Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
As a youngster, Leo Reise Sr. suffered a major setback to his pursuit of a career in professional hockey. He lost sight in one of his eyes. The loss did not come as a result of an injury but rather as the result of an optical nerve that simply died.
Nonetheless, Reise pressed on, undaunted in his determination to make it in hockey. He was an excellent skater and had a handy touch as a playmaker as well. He first gained fame with the senior-league Hamilton Tigers of the OHA. He manned their blueline for three seasons until the club hooked up with the NHL. Reise stayed on for parts of four seasons, tying Punch Broadbent of Ottawa for the league lead in assists in 1921-22.

He then headed west to earn more money with the Saskatoon Crescents of the Western Professional League. Three years later, the Hamilton Tigers moved to New York City to become the Americans. Reise rejoined his former club in the Big Apple for parts of four more campaigns before jumping to the cross-town rival Rangers for 14 games.

Afterwards, he joined the IAHL's London Tecumsehs and Pittsburgh Yellowjacktes to round out his career in 1932.
There's more in Dreakmur's bio from last year: http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...3&postcount=12Leo Reise Sr., the rushing defenseman who has been described as spectacular and a star on the Americans toward the end of a career that bridged eras in hockey. After the NHA ended and through the beginnings of the NHL and rival WCHL/WHL years of the 1920's, Leo Reise was an impact player in the hockey world. He was 24 years old in 1917 when he joined the Hamilton Tigers of the OHA senior amateur league and became a goal scorer. He was a 2nd team all-star his first year, scored two goals in a playoff game against a Toronto team featuring Babe Dye en route to winning the Allan Cup his second year, was a 1st team all-star his third year and 2nd team all-star again his fourth year. Then Hamilton joined the NHL and he immediately had a career year finishing second in NHL assists in 1921-22 while continuing to score goals, finishing the season a point shy of a point per game, playing with Prodger and Malone. The following season Malone was gone, Reise was 30 years old and his assists dropped down from second in the NHL to third on the last-place team. He was 4th and 6th in NHL points among defensemen those two seasons. Reise wanted to leave the basement dwelling club and play in the west where he made more money for Saskatoon of the WCHL. He was 10th and 9th in points among defensemen and in the third year the team was in the WHL and he finished 6th in points among defensemen. The next season he went back to the NHL and was 5th in NHL points among defensmen. His second year back in the NHL he was fourth in team goals but the 35 year old would no longer put up significant assists or total points. He would go on to play two more full seasons, making the NHL playoffs for the first time as an over-the-hill veteran with the Americans in 1929 and Rangers in 1930, pointless in both postseasons, leaving the NHL thereafter at age 37 after seven full NHL seasons over the course of his career. He would play two more years of pro hockey in the IHL, described no longer as a speedy playmaker but, as "...this big powerful, broad-shouldered stalwart... is the dogged, steady plugger type".



Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
....an excellent skater and had a handy touch as a playmaker...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Press – February 26th, 1931
Leo Reise is regarded as one of the fastest skaters in hockey. He has beaten Howie Morenz the phantom of the Canadiens in speed contests they have engaged in.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddy Jones, editor of the Hamilton Herald
Under new environments he should dazzle the westerners with his flashy rushes.…

Reise played wonderful hockey for the Hamilton ‘pros’ last season and earned a steady job. His rushes featured almost every game. He often expressed a desire to be traded or sold to a western club, so, with his wish gratified, he should play sterling hockey for Saskatoon. Hamilton fans are sorry to see the the big boy go


Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
As a youngster, Leo Reise Sr. suffered a major setback to his pursuit of a career in professional hockey. He lost sight in one of his eyes. The loss did not come as a result of an injury but rather as the result of an optical nerve that simply died.
Nonetheless, Reise pressed on, undaunted in his determination to make it in hockey. He was an excellent skater and had a handy touch as a playmaker as well. He first gained fame with the senior-league Hamilton Tigers of the OHA. He manned their blueline for three seasons until the club hooked up with the NHL. Reise stayed on for parts of four seasons, tying Punch Broadbent of Ottawa for the league lead in assists in 1921-22.

He then headed west to earn more money with the Saskatoon Crescents of the Western Professional League. Three years later, the Hamilton Tigers moved to New York City to become the Americans. Reise rejoined his former club in the Big Apple for parts of four more campaigns before jumping to the cross-town rival Rangers for 14 games.

Afterwards, he joined the IAHL's London Tecumsehs and Pittsburgh Yellowjacktes to round out his career in 1932.
There's more in Dreakmur's bio from last year: http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...3&postcount=12

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Old
10-27-2013, 04:28 PM
  #136
BubbaBoot
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Gonna try but after not having work for over a year I've been overwhelmed recently, (in the middle of an 18 straight day stretch right now). I've been using other folks bios for now....I just can't spend a lot of research time on this like I did in the last 2 drafts.

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Old
10-28-2013, 05:10 PM
  #137
Rob Scuderi
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Glen Murray, RW


1009 GP, 651 PTS
94 playoff GP, 42 PTS

Goals: T2 ('02), 5 ('03), T12 ('04), T19 ('00)
Assists: T15 ('03)
Points: 7 ('03), T17 ('02)

Team Scoring Placements: 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5
2x All-Star Game participant

49 adjusted ES points per season, 15 adjusted PP points per season

VsX scores: 88.46 (2003), 78.89 (2002), 68.97 (2004), 65.96 (2002), 65.93 (1998), 50.00 (2006)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Murray spent three years with the Wolves before joining the Bruins towards the end of their 1991-92 regular season and playoff run which led them to the Wales Conference finals against the eventual Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins.

In 1992-93, the Halifax, N.S. native split his season with the Bruins and their AHL affiliate in Providence before earning a permanent roster spot with the team the following year. After playing in 37 games with Boston in 1994-95, the Bruins traded Murray to the Pittsburgh Penguins during the off season, where he spent one full season and the better part of a second before he was dealt to the Los Angeles Kings in the latte stages of the 1996-97 season.

In his first full season with the Kings in 1997-98, Murray set a career high in goals (29), assists (31) and points (60). Murray spent two more years in Los Angeles, bettering his season high in points with 62 during the 99-2000 season before he was traded back to Boston early in the 2001-02 season. Upon his return to Boston in 2002-03, Murray broke out offensively and set career highs in all three offensive categories with 44 goals and 48 assists for 92 points before seeing his totals dip in 2003-04 to 60 points.

On the international stage, Murray has represented his homeland at the 1998 World Championships and for the second time in 2004, helping Canada capture their second gold medal in as many years.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated - 3/3/2003
The Secret Is Out
In his second stint in Boston, emerging star right wing Glen Murray has drawn comparisons to an alltime great

The name across the back of his black-and-gold sweater was the same, but when the Bruins acquired right wing Glen Murray from the Kings in October 2001, little else suggested that he was the same player Boston had drafted in 1991 and given up on four years later. The Murray who was shipped to the Penguins for wing Kevin Stevens in August '95 was an erratic shooter and a tentative skater who was often behind the play. "The NHL was too quick for me," Murray says of his first stint in Boston.

Now 30, Murray is quicker, stronger and more mature. Since returning to the Bruins with center Jozef Stumpel in the trade that sent center Jason Allison to Los Angeles, the 6'3", 225-pound Murray has become one of the best snipers in the NHL. Thanks to a lightning release and a wicked slap shot, he was one of five players with 40 or more goals last season (he had a career-high 41) and through Sunday was on pace to equal that total this year. (He had 30 goals, eighth in the league, and 65 points, the 11th-highest total.)

Last month Murray played in his first All-Star Game, and his style—he often darts in and out of the area between the circles-is drawing comparisons to hockey royalty. "The thing he does well is find open areas on the ice," says Flyers defenseman Eric Weinrich. "He's like Brett Hull."

"Not to take anything away from Brett Hull," says Bruins general manager Mike O'Connell, "but Glen is a more complete player."

Murray had two mediocre seasons in Pittsburgh but turned around his career after he was dealt to the Kings in 1997. He received consistent ice time with L.A. and scored 29 goals in '97-98 and again in 1999-2000. (A sprained right knee in '98-99 held him to 16 goals in 61 games.) "I learned defensemen's tendencies and how to find dead spots on the ice," he says.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1995-96
The Finesse Game
Nothing seemed to go right for Murray last season. Coaches tried the bad cop/good cop routine on him, first benching him and then boosting him to the number one line with Adam Oates and Cam Neely, it also put him on the left wing, on his backhand, and Murray isn't deft enough with the puck to do much with passes coming onto his backhand.
Murray has good size and a good short game that had fans in Boston calling him the "Mini Cam" - as in Neely, which is part of the curse of expectation that Neely has to cope with.
He does have a quick release, and like a lot of great goal scorers he just plain shoots. He doesn't even have to look at the net because he feels where the shot is going. He protects the puck well with his body.

The Physical Game
Murray isn't the fighter that Neely was early in his career, either, so he doesn't get as much room as Neely does.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
The Finesse Game
Murray is a lumbering skater who often looked out of place with the fleet, European-style Penguins.

The Physical Game
On nights when he's playing well, Murray is leaning on people and making his presence felt. He likes to bang, but on some nights he doesn't want to pay the price and prefers to rely on his shot. When he sleepwalks, he is useless. When he's ready to rock-and-roll, he is effective.

The Intangibles
Murray is an enigma. He has trouble finding his role in Boston and the same problem dogged him in Pittsburgh.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
The Finesse Game
Murray is a little fragile confidence-wise, but he showed pretty good resilience after being dealt for the third time in the last three seasons. He was a welcome sight to Kings coach Larry Robinson, and Murray responded with 5-3-8 in 11 games with L.A.

The Intangibles
Murray was buried on a strong Penguins team, where the European style didn't suit his North American game. The Kings play a more basic style and Murray will get a good shot at a regular job as the number one right wing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
The Finesse Game
Murray is a lumbering skater who needs a good old dump-and-chase game, on a line with a playmaker who can get him the puck and set him up in the slot. He found his man in Jozef Stumpel.
Murray is more consistently using his speed and strength to get in better scoring position.

The Physical Game
If he's going to be a top-notch power forward, he needs to bring his top game every night.

The Intangibles
Murray was the number one right winger in L.A. and will be so again this season, getting prime power-play time. He is gaining confidence and has thrived under coach Larry Robinson.


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10-28-2013, 05:28 PM
  #138
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Guy Chouinard, C

Top 20 Points: 6 (1979)
Top 20 Goals: 4 (1979)
Top 20 Assists: 9 (1979), 10 (1983), 20 (1981)

Scored 83 points in 52 games in 1981 (5th in PPG/3rd in APG), and 80 points in 64 games in 1982 (8th in APG)

All-Star Team voting: 3rd (1979) behind Trottier and Dionne

Team scoring placements: 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 4, 4

Played the point on the power play

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Chouinard finally got his chance to play in the NHL on a full-time basis in 1976-77, playing 80 games and scoring 17 goals and 50 points. He improved to 28 goals and 58 points the next year but it was the 1978-79 season when he had the year of his life, scoring 50 goals and 57 assists for 107 points. That excellent year was followed by a pair of 31-goal seasons, the second of which came in Calgary, after the club had re-located there for the 1980-81 season.

Chouinard remained with the Flames through the 1982-83 season, but despite being only 26, his best years were already behind him. In 80 games that year, he did scored 72 points but just 13 goals. He finished his NHL career a year later, playing with the St. Louis Blues. After returning for the first nine games of the 1984-85 season in the IHL with Peoria, Chouinard opted to hang up the skates, his heart no longer in the competitive game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier's Greatest Hockey Legends
Guy never got back to the form he once had and was eventually traded to St. Louis on September 6, 1983. In St. Louis he played one more season. Because of his bum knee Guy could not make the Blues roster at the 1984 training camp and was sent down to Peoria (IHL). He only played 9 games there before hanging 'em up barely 29 years old.

Guy could have played another 4-5 years but he had enough. Years before Guy retired he had the following thoughts on retirement:

"My philosophy is simple. And that is that you fire all the ammunition you can for as long as you can. When you can no longer give your best and cannot help the team, then it's time to hang 'em up. You should always strive to be a rising star in whatever business you're involved in."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey - 1979
"Gramps"....Promising young player who looks like promising old player...Made valuable contribution last season when he picked up scoring slack...Islanders general manager Bill Torrey says, "He's one of the most improved players around."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey - 1980
Burst in forefront of league's top scorers with best season ever by a Flames' center...Finished sixth in NHL scoring race just behind teammate Bob MacMillan...Was third-highest scorer among centers, trialing Bryan Trottier and Marcel Dionne...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey - 1981
A big gun in team's arsenal...Was fourth youngest player in NHL to score 50 goals...Holds club record goal-scoring streak of six games...Slumped last season but still finished second on team in points and power-play goals...One of leading young centers in game...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey - 1982
Missed 28 games with knee injury but produced 83 points in 52 matches...Was a key Flame in playoffs with 17 points in 16 games...Strong, fast skater who is excellent puckhandler and playmaker...Combines with Nilsson to give team a top one-two punch at center...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey - 1983
Plagued by injuries the past two season...When sound, he is a splenid attacker, swift, excellent scorer and playmaker...Produced 80 points in 64 games last season...One of the NHL's best power-play workers, he scored 13 of 23 goals in that situation last season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey - 1984
Healthy after two injury-laden seasons, he played in all 80 games last year...His 13 goals were the lowest total of NHL career but he had 59 assists and his playmaking helped winger Lanny McDonald to 66-goal season...Not especially fast but smart with the puck and a strong point-man on power play...


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10-30-2013, 06:58 PM
  #139
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Donald Audette
right wing




• Shoots: Right • Height: 5'8" • Weight: 190 lbs. •
• Born: September 23, 1969 • Laval, Quebec •
• Draft: Buffalo • 9th round (183rd overall) • 1989 NHL Entry • from: Laval Titan (QMJHL) •
• Played: 1990/91 - 2003/04 (NHL) •



Championships
1989 QMJHL Championships

Awards
1989 Guy Lafleur Trophy (QMJHL Playoffs MVP)
1989-90 Red Garrett Award (AHL Rookie of the Year)
1991-92 Fred T. Hunt Memorial Trophy (Buffalo Sabres Rookie of the Year)

NHL All-Star Games
00-01

All-Star Teams
1989 QMJHL First Team
1990 AHL First Team

Calder Trophy Voting
1991-92 (6th)



Achievements
• Games Played
- Career NHL • 735
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 73

• Goals
1987-88 QMJHL 48 (15)
1988-89 QMJHL 76 (3)
1988-89 QMJHL PLAYOFFS 17 (1)
1989-90 AHL 42 (10)
1989-90 AHL PLAYOFFS 9 (T4)
- Career NHL • 260
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 21

• EV Goals
- Career NHL • 160

• PP Goals
1994-95 NHL 13 (2)
- Career NHL • 97

• Assists
1988-89 QMJHL 85 (T8)
1989-90 AHL 46 (13)
- Career NHL • 249
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 27

• Points
1987-88 QMJHL 109 (T15)
1988-89 QMJHL 161 (3)
1988-89 QMJHL PLAYOFFS 29 (T2)
1989-90 AHL 88 (T8)
1989-90 AHL PLAYOFFS 17 (T5)
- Career NHL • 509
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 48

• Points Per Game
- Career NHL • 0.69
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 0.66



career stats
gms G A TP PIMs+/- G/gm A/gm PP SH
NHL 735 260 249 509 584 -17 .35 .34 97 3
NHL PLAYOFFS 73 21 27 48 46 -14 .29 .37 90
QMJHL 199 141168309215 .71.84280
AHL 92 595511498 .64.6020

• career team records •
Buffalo Sabres (NHL) - games (37) / playoff games (9) / goals (15) / playoff goals (T8) / EV goals (19) / PP goals (9) / goals per game (T11) / playoff goals per game (T30) / assists (41) / playoff assists (T6) / assists per game (59) / playoff assists per game (T20) / points (6) / playoff points (6) / points per game (T25) / playoff points per game (T22) / PIMs (29) / playoff PIMs (T29)

1991-92 / BUF / goals (4) / assists (8) / points (5)
1993-94 / BUF / goals (3) / assists (6) / points (3)
1994-95 / BUF / goals (1) / assists (6) / points (2)
1996-97 / BUF / goals (1) / assists (9) / points (3)
1997-98 / BUF / goals (1) / assists (T8) / points (3)
1998-99 / LA / goals (2) / assists (T6) / points (2)
2000-01 / ATL / goals (1) / assists (4) / points (2)



Accolades

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey

A big-time success story, Audette was drafted 183rd overall and looked to be filler for the Sabres minor-league teams. He had taken the Laval Titan to the Memorial Cup finals in 1988-89 during a year in which he scored 76 goals and 161 points, despite his small stature.

The next year he was assigned to Rochester, and again proved his worth by scoring 42 goals to win the AHL rookie of the year award, and he scored another four times in just eight games with the Sabres. In his first full season he scored 31 goals and was named the team's top rookie, subsequently establishing himself as a solid 20-goal man in the league.

In all, Audette played nine years with Buffalo. He missed 22 games in 1992-93 after serious knee injury, and in 1995-96 missed more than half a season after reconstructive surgery for a torn ACL. Each time he bounced back to score more and play effective, two-way hockey, but in 1998-99 he was traded to Los Angeles and the year after to the fledgling Atlanta Thrashers.

In 2000-01, he proved his worth in spades, scoring 32 goals for the Trashers. But he was on the move again, back to Buffalo by season's end, a proven scorer back to where it all began.

The Laval, Quebec native played ony 12 games with Sabres his second time around before moving on to Dallas and then Montreal where he has spent the better part of the past two seasons. After beginning the 2003-04 season in Montreal, Audette spent some time with the team's AHL affiliate in Toronto before joining the Florida Panthers just prior to the All-Star break.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Slam Hockey Forecaster

The small but pesky Audette is a model of consistency when healthy. He's at his best on the power play, jabbing and scrapping feverishly around the opposing goal. Moreover, a good shot and quick feet allow him to be considered a solid goal-scoring threat.

A natural, Audette plays bigger than his 5-foot-8, 184-pound frame and generally works for every point he registers. He's terrific at standing in front of the net in order to finish off the play. Much like former teammate Luc Robitaille with the Kings, Audette's biggest assets are his hands and keen sense of how to play it around an opposition goal.

While with the Kings in late November 1999, Audette flourished on a line with Bryan Smolinski and Glen Murray. However, he fell into an unexplainable funk in late December and was even a healthy scratch on a couple of occasions. The sneaky sniper wasn't one of coach Andy Murray's favourite Kings, apparently.

Audette can score a lot of goals on his own. He's that type of player! He doesn't necessarily need that strong a supporting cast. Could eventually form quite a pair with rookie Thrasher Patrik Stefan.

A 31-goal scorer as a NHL rookie in 1991-92, Audette can realistically still put up a couple of 20-goal seasons. Primary downfall, however, is that he often gets injured.

During his pre-NHL career, Audette was most notably chosen as the AHL's Rookie of the Year in 1989-90 when he went 42-46-88 in 70 games, and a First All-Star member as a Laval Titan in the QMJHL with a sizzling 76-85-161 offensive log in 1988-89.


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10-31-2013, 08:46 PM
  #140
Rob Scuderi
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Gord Murphy, D

Averaged 22.7 minutes over 862 games played
Team TOI Ranks: 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 6

1x winner of Barry Ashbee Trophy (Flyers best defenseman) in 1990

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Murphy joined the defence corps of the Philadelphia Flyers and made an immediate impact by gaining a point in his first NHL game and by leading all Flyers rookies in scoring with 35 points. Over the next four seasons, Murphy was one of the Flyers most consistent defenseman, winning the Barry Ashbee Trophy as Flyers defenseman of the year in his sophomore season.

After spending a brief time in Boston with the Bruins, newly named Florida Panther General Manager Bobby Clarke liked what he saw in Murphy as a Flyer and claimed him in the 1993 Expansion Draft.

Murphy spent the next six seasons on defense for the Florida Panthers, leading them to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1996. Constantly one of the workhorses of the Panther "D", Murphy was often in the top scoring on the team defense. Murphy also represented his country at the World Championships in the spring of 1998.

In the summer of 1999, Gord Murphy was traded again to an expansion team, this time to the Atlanta Thrashers. During the 2000-01 season, Murphy suffered a season ending injury that forced him to miss the majority of the season with the Thrashers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1990-1991
The Finesse Game
Increased confidence that comes from understanding of the NHL is the reason Murphy contributed the way he did to the Flyers' offense last season. He has good offensive skills, if not outstanding ones, but judgment and intelligence make his assets better.
His intelligence is evident in his passing choices, and he gets a good read of the ice both from the offensive blue line and as he moves back through the neutral zone.

The Physical Game
Despite his lean build - there's not a lot of muscle on his frame - Murphy is pretty tough in front of his own net...He is unafraid of the opposition and will go into the corners with anyone.

The Intangibles
Murphy is a quality kid, really coachable with a solid work ethic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1991-92
The Finesse Game
Murphy is an impressively mobile, agile skater who turns well to either side and who can make a neat change of directions in a very small amount of space. He has the speed to join the rush, the strength to skate through checks, the balance to hold his own when trying to keep the goalie's crease clear.
He also has a nice touch with the puck in close quarters and a strong snap shot from the right point. Murphy's hand skills also compliment his hockey sense; he doesn't get the puck and hold it, he gets the puck and moves it ahead.
Beyond that, Murphy uses his stick, reach and instincts well. It may look as though an opponent has beaten him wide, but Murphy will angle the player to bad ice or dive effectively to poke the puck away.

The Physical Game
For a 205-pound player, Murphy is not especially enthusiastic about making the most of his size. He gets in people's way, he's strong enough to get by, but he is not a force in the strength aspect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1993-94
The Finesse Game
Murphy does a lot of little things nicely, but never consistently or forcefully enough to be much of a presence as an NHL defenseman.
He also carries the puck well, although he gets into trouble when he overhandles it in his own zone. Murphy usually makes a safe pass, holding on until he is just about decked and then making a nice play. He plays the point on the power play, using a slap or strong snap from the blueline, and will occasionally cheat to the top of the circle.

The Physical Game
Murphy uses his finesse skills to defend. His long reach makes him an effective poke-checker, and he would rather wrap his arms around an attack than move him out of the crease with a solid hit. He's more of a pusher than hitter.

The Intangibles
He was never a tough sort to begin with, and an ugly incident during the 1990-91 season took much of the heart out of him. Murphy was racing to touch down a puck for an icing, when he was hit from behind with a high check by Dale Hunter. Hunter received a four game suspension. Murphy was knocked unconscious and taken off the ice on a stretcher, and hasn't been the same player after.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1995-96
The Finesse Game
Murphy has emerged as the team's top offensive defenseman. He moves the puck well and joins the rush eagerly. Murphy plays the point on the power play, and uses a pull and drag shot, rather than a big slap shot, giving him a very quick release.

The Physical Game
He is responsible defensively and is used to kill penalties. He logged a lot of ice time and held up well under the grind.

The Intangibles
Murphy is not, and will never be, a tough customer, but he has improved his positional play and can step up and provide some offensive spark. He is most effective with a physical, stay-at-home partner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
The Finesse Game
The development of rookie Robert Svehla took much of the offensive responsibility away from Murphy, who has concentrated on becoming a better defensive player. Murphy uses his finesse skills in a two-way role. Murphy plays a smart positional game and makes intelligent defensive reads.

The Intangibles
He is best with a physical, stay-at-home partner, but he can also be paired with a mobile defenseman and stay back for the defensive work himself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
The Finesse Game
He is patient with the puck along the blueline, sliding laterally until he spots the open lane. Murphy plays a smart positional game and makes intelligent defensive reads. He doesn't get suckered into pulling out of his position. He makes a steady, reliable partner for a more offensive-minded or inexperienced player.


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10-31-2013, 09:11 PM
  #141
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Stewart Evans, D

All-Star Team voting record according to TDMM's methodology
37-38: 8th
38-39: 10th

1x Stanley Cup winner (1935)
Montreal Maroons Captain 1937-38

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Stewart Evans had a nine-year NHL career that began in 1930-31 with the Detroit Falcons. In 43 games Evans one goal and four assists and five points.

In 1931-32, Evans was sent to play Detroit Olympics of the IHL where he had three goals and 12 points. In 1932-33 Evans was back in the NHL with the Detroit Red Wings, who evolved from the old Falcons team. He had two goals and eight points as well as 74 penalty minutes.

Midway through the 1933-34 season Evans was traded to the Montreal Maroons, where he scored four goals and two assists in 27 games. Evans played five seasons with the Maroons and was a member of their Stanley Cup winning team in 1935. Individually, his best season was 1936-37 when he had six goals and seven assists for 13 points in 48 games.

Evans' final year in the NHL was 1938-39 with the Montreal Canadiens where he scored nine points in 43 games. For his career he played in 367 games, had 28 goals, 49 assists, and 77 points.
Jack Adams teaches Evans to bodycheck by making him practice without a stick, Evans eventually becomes one of the most feared defenseman in the league

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette - Dec 6, 1933
And his defence of Doug Young and Stew Evans, with able relief by the burly Freddy Robertson, gave him strong support as did the tight back-checking of the forwards.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star - Jan 19, 1934
The fine defensive play of "Stew" Evans with Maroons last night was one of the features of a typical rough and rugged Montreal-Detroit National League fixture. For some unexplained reason Maroons and Red Wings have always been bitter hockey rivals. Seldom has a game been played between these two clubs at Olympia without a flare-up. Last night there were three outstanding jousts. Evans was in one of them engaging in a short but snappy wrestling and slugging duel with Herbie Lewis.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette - Oct 30, 1935
When Stew Evans came to terms after a short holdout period, the squad was assured its four rearguards would be ready again. Evans paired with Marvin "Cy" Wentworth last year for one of the best units in hockey.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en

1935 playoffs
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trail of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 2
Wentworth and Evans maintained a stout defence for Montreal but Ching Johnson was not up to his usual form for New York.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star Apr. 3, 1935
Unlike the Boston Bruins, who had only Eddie Shore and Babe Siebert for the heavy defensive end, Maroons have four first-rate rearguards. From end to end they rate higher than the Bruins -- who were tough enough for the Leafs in the National League finals.

Montreal's rear division men, Lionel Conacher, Allan Shields, Marvin Wentworth and Stew Evans, may break on a rush to relieve pressure but otherwise they are expected to sit tight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon Star-Phoenix Apr. 5, 1935
The Conachers -- Lionel of Maroons and Charlie of Leafs -- didn't come together once. Stew Evans and Allan Shields were the Montreal defensemen looking after Charlie's side of the rink. They did high class work keeping out the big Toronto marksman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette Apr. 10, 1935
Maroons defence made the difference between a cup-winning team and an also ran. Led by Wentworth, Conacher, Shields and Evans played great hockey. The feature of the Maroons play right through the series was their marvellous defensive game, backed by superb goaltending by Connell. In the pinches, Maroons defence stood out as the class of the league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald Feb. 20, 1935
The trouble started at Montreal when Horner boarded Herbie Cain. He was on his way to the penalty box when Stew Evans attacked him and after the fist fight had been quelled Horner and Marvin Wentworth, who was confused with Evans by the officials, each got majors.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meriden Record Mar. 14, 1939
Red Horner, with 75 minutes in penalties, continued in the 'bad man' role for the league while Stew Evans of Montreal took second to Toronto firebrand with 58 minutes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette - Dec 29, 1937
Best of the Maroons were hardworking Stew Evans. Des Smith, Billy Beveridge, Russ Blinco, Herbie Cain, and Jimmy Ward.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Windsor Daily Star Dec. 10, 1937
Stew Evans, big Maroon defenseman, and a former Red Wing, led the winning drive... Evans scored twice on lone rushes that carried him crashing through the Detroit defense early in the last period
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Leader-Post Dec. 10, 1937
"Did you see that man Evans?" [King Clancy]

None among the meager 3000 could have missed seeing Stew Evans, who barged up from his defence position to score the third and fourth Maroon goals - his first of the year - in the third period.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Leader-Post - Jan 3, 1942
Stew Evans, the old-time defence star for the Maroons and Canadiens, is an executive in a motor plant working on tank production...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en


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11-02-2013, 02:18 PM
  #142
BubbaBoot
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Vic Lynn
left wing / defense




• Shoots: Left • Height: 5'10" • Weight: 185 lbs. •
• Born: September 23, 1969 • Saskatoon, Saskatchewan •
• Played: 1942/43 - 1953/54 (NHL) \\\ 1942/43 (EAHL) \\\ 1943/44 - 1952/53 (AHL) \\\1953/54 - 1958/59 (WHL) \\\ 1959/60 - 1964/65 (SSHL) \\\ !965/66 (WSSHL)•



Championships
1947 Stanley Cup (NHL)
1948 Stanley Cup (NHL)
1949 Stanley Cup (NHL)
1957 Lester Patrick Trophy (WHL)
1960 Championship (SSHL)
1962 Championship (SSHL)
1963 Championship (SSHL)
1964 Championship (SSHL)

Awards
Listed as #161 in "Legends of the Leafs: Toronto's 200 Greatest Hockey Heroes" By Bruce Meharg

All-Star Games
1947 / 1948 / 1949 (NHL)

All-Star Teams
1962 SSHL 1st All-Star Team (Player-Coach)
1966 WCSHL 2nd All-Star Team (Player-Coach)



Achievements
• Games Played
- Career NHL • 327
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 47

• Goals
1945-46 AHL 26 (T10)
1945-46 AHL PLAYOFFS 5 (T3)
- Career NHL • 49
- Career AHL • 60
- Career WHL • 74
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 7

• Assists
1947-48 NHL PLAYOFFS 5 (T3)
1956-57 WHL PLAYOFFS 7 (T3)
- Career NHL • 76
- Career AHL • 82
- Career WHL • 110
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 10

• Points
1945-46 AHL 51 (T13)
1945-46 AHL PLAYOFFS 10 (T5)
1947-48 NHL PLAYOFFS 7 (T5)
1956-57 WHL PLAYOFFS 9 (T2)
1959-60 SSHL PLAYOFFS 10 (10)
- Career NHL • 125
- Career AHL • 142
- Career WHL • 184
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 17

• Points Per Game
- Career NHL • 0.38
- Career AHL • 0.59
- Career WHL • 0.63
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 0.36

• PIMs
1942-43 EAHL 122 (1)
1942-43 EAHL PLAYOFFS 30 (1)
1943-44 AHL 61 (3)
1944-45 AHL 92 (2)
1945-46 AHL 60 (9)
1947-48 NHL PLAYOFFS 20 (1)
1954-55 WHL 82 (7)
1955-56 WHL 100 (6)
1956-57 WHL 137 (6)
1959-60 SSHL PLAYOFFS 12 (T3)
- Career NHL • 125
- Career AHL • 142
- Career WHL • 184
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 17



career stats
gms G A TP PIMs+/- G/gm A/gm PP SH
NHL 327 49 76 125 274 .15 .23  
NHL PLAYOFFS 47 7 10 17 46   .15 .21  
WHL 291 74110184402 .25.37  
AHL 240 6082142284 .25.34  

• career team records •
Saskatoon Quakers (WHL) - games (7) / goals (9) / assists (9) / points (9) / PIMs (7)



Accolades

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey

While growing up on the local rinks of Saskatoon, Vic Lynn became very noticeable for his exceptional speed on a pair of blades. When his skating skills were harmonized with the game of hockey, the young upstart was destined for a lengthy career in the pro ranks.

In 1943-44, he fell in with the Detroit Red Wings' organization but failed to impress the team's brass. As such, Lynn was sent to play for the Indianapolis Capitals of the AHL. It was there that he encountered former NHLer and current American League referee Rabbit McVeigh. McVeigh noticed Lynn's aggressive, hard-working style of play. He also noticed that the youngster had a ret-hot temper that could, if not contained, limit his chances to make it to the top. On occasion, the sage ref would issue Lynn a penalty with an admonition to settle down and learn to take hard knocks with a cooler head.

Several years later, as Lynn had been given the cold shoulder by not only the Wings, but the Canadiens as well, he landed in Buffalo of the AHL. It was at that time that Leafs' GM Conn Smythe was in search of some fresh talent to spark his sagging club. During a chance meeting with McVeigh, he got a tip to watch young Lynn as a possible solution to his roster woes. Smythe did just that and ended up bringing the speedster to Toronto.

As a Leaf, Lynn joined Howie Meeker and Teeder Kennedy to form "The K-L-M Line." The trio clicked for three seasons of successful hockey with Stanley Cup victories in 1947, 1948, and 1949. During the tail end of his stay with the Leafs, Lynn teamed with Joe Klukay and later Johnny McCormack to form outstanding penalty-killing combinations.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slam Hockey

The Saskatoon-born Lynn played in the NHL from 1942 to 1954 and while with the Leafs was on a line with two legends, Ted Kennedy and Howie Meeker. The 1947 final saw Lynn hamper Rocket Richard to the point where the angry Montreal Canadiens’ star clubbed Lynn and cut his head open. Richard eventually was kicked out of Game 2. Lynn scored big goals in Games 3 and 6.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier

Vic Lynn is the only player in NHL history to skate for all of the Original Six teams. Lynn played one game for the New York Rangers in 1943. He was picked up by the Detroit Red Wings and played just three games. He played another two with the Montreal Canadiens in 1945 before joining the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1946. Lynn won three Stanley Cups over five seasons in Toronto. Lynn would also go on to play a few dozen games with both the Boston Bruins and the Chicago Blackhawks as well.

While Lynn was an important member of the 1940s Toronto Maple Leafs teams, much of his professional career was spent in the minor leagues. He toiled in cities like Indianapolis, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, Providence and Cleveland. But he never minded.

"I spent five years in the minors before I got my first real chance," he recalled. "But I got to see the world."

For all his stops, he is best known (at least outside of his native Saskatchewan) as a Toronto Maple Leaf. He played left wing on the KLM Line with Teeder Kennedy and Howie Meeker. But Lynn spent most of his hockey career actually playing as a defenseman.

"Defence had always been my position but when Conn Smythe and Hap Day brought me up, they moved me to left wing, and that's where I played for the next five years. Kennedy was outstanding at centre and that always helped, and Meeker was a speed demon, and the three of us always got along well together."

Lynn, more of a banger and crasher, also formed memorable penalty kill tandems with Joe Klukay and later Johnny McCormack.

Vic Lynn was born in Saskatoon in 1925. He was a junior hockey star (as well as a football player) who was dubbed the "Saskatoon Streak." He was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1987, thanks in large part to his returning to the Saskatchewan city after his NHL days to play senior hockey for the Quakers hockey team. In a decade of senior hockey following his NHL days Lynn led the club to seven Saskatchewan championships and four Western Canada titles.


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11-02-2013, 09:12 PM
  #143
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Bill Flett
right wing




• Shoots: right • Height: 6' 1" • Weight: 205 lbs. •
• Born: July 21,1943 • Vermillion, Alberta •
• Played: 1967/68 - 1976/77, 1979/80 (NHL) \\\ 1976/77 - 1978/79 (WHA) •



Championships
1974 Stanley Cup (NHL)

All-Star Game
NHL - 1971

• All-Star Teams •
1962 First Team • SJHL



Achievements

• Games
- Career NHL • 689
- Career WHA • 195

• Goals
- 1962-63 SJHL 31 (T6)
- 1962-63 SJHL PLAYOFFS 7 (2)
- 1972-73 NHL 43 (5)
- 1977-78 WHA 41 (8)
- Career NHL • 202
- Career WHA 103 (52nd all-time)

• Assists •
- 1962-63 SJHL 54 (2)
- 1962-63 SJHL PLAYOFFS 11 (1)
- Career NHL • 215

• Points •
- 1962-63 SJHL 85 (2)
- 1962-63 SJHL PLAYOFFS 18 (2)
- Career NHL • 417(31st among RWers)

• PIMs •
- 1962-63 SJHL PLAYOFFS 40 (T4)
- Career NHL • 501



career stats
gms G A TP PIMs+/- G/gm A/gm PP SH
NHL 689202 215 417501-58 .29 .31 379
NHL PLAYOFFS 52 7 16 23 42  .14 .31 11
WHA 1951038418768+42.53.4324 1
WHA PLAYOFFS 15 5 4 9 4   .33 .27  
CPHL 156 47 73 120 166  .30.47  
SJHL 104 55 70 125 138  .52.67  

career team records
Los Angeles Kings (NHL) - games (40) / goals (29) / assists (T44)
Philadelphia Flyers (NHL) - goals (43) / plus-minus (38)
Edmonton Oilers (WHA) - goals (3) / pp goals (2) /assists (10) / points (4) / g-game (2) / a-game (7) / p-game (3)



Accolades

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey

Bill Flett began playing hockey at the age of five on outdoor rinks made by his father C.M., himself a former professional hockey player in Los Angeles and Spokane in the old Western League and also with Baltimore of the Eastern League. While growing up in Alberta, Bill started riding in rodeos and he was soon tagged with the nickname "Cowboy." "All the guys played football, hockey, and baseball together during the school year and rode in rodeos together in the summer." Flett said. He also was certain that had he not made it as a hockey player, he most certainly would have been a full-time rodeo rancher.

In 1962, Flett joined the Melville Millionaires of the Western Canadian Junior League at the age of 19 where he scored 35 goals and 85 points in his rookie season. The 85 points was good enough for second in team scoring and he was named to the league's All-Star team.

In 1963-64 season, Flett joined the Charlotte Checkers in the EHL where he had 47 points in just 41 games. In 1964-65, Flett joined the Victoria Maple Leafs, where he was signed to a pro contract by coach Rudy Pilous. However, Flett saw limited ice time and was sent to the Tulsa Ice Oilers where General Manager Ray Miron was convinced Flett could become a key contributor. The Oilers finished the season in fourth place and had to face the first place team and defending Adams Cup Champion Omaha Knights in the semi-finals. The Oilers upset the Knights in six games but lost the Adams Cup finals. Flett played three years in the minors before getting his shot at the NHL.

In June of 1967, Flett was selected from the Toronto Maple Leafs by the Los Angeles Kings in the NHL expansion draft. During his rookie NHL season at the age of 24, Flett scored 26 goals and 46 points for the Kings. He spent the next five years of his career in Los Angeles, when in January of 1972, Flett was part of an eight player trade to the Philadelphia Flyers. Flett's second season in Philadelphia was his best season ever as a pro. He appeared in 69 games, scoring 43 goals and 31 assists for 74 points. This placed him fourth in team scoring behind Bobby Clarke, Rick MacLeish, and Gary Dornhoefer.

The 1974 playoffs was the highlight of Flett's pro hockey career, when the Flyers defeated the heavily favoured Boston Bruins to win the Stanley Cup championship. Flett was especially strong in a Game Two victory, where he assisted on two Bobby Clarke's goals, including the game winner. It also marked the first time in almost seven years that the Flyers were able beat Bobby Orr and the Bruins in the Boston Garden. The Flyers took the series four-games-to-two, becoming the first expansion team to win Lord Stanley's Cup.

During the off-season Flett was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs where he played one year before being sold to the Atlanta Flames in May, 1975. He was then sent to the Edmonton Oilers of the WHA in December, 1976. Flett played two and a half years with the Oilers in the WHA and joined them as they were absorbed into the NHL for the 1979-80 season, with the collapse of the WHA. However, after just 20 games back in the NHL, it was evident to Flett that the Oilers were in the midst of a huge youth movement with the likes of Gretzky, Messier, Coffey, Anderson and Kurri all on the horizon to lead the team for the next decade. Flett retired but was immediately given a job scouting with the team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier

Back in 1974, Cowboy Bill Flett was on top of the universe. He was a tough-as-nails right-winger with the Stanley Cup Champion Philadelphia Flyers. He fought many battles in his hockey career, and won most of them.

However Cowboy fought the biggest battle in his life, and lost. Bill Flett died on July 12, 1999.

It started out back in 1993 when a severe ulcer attack almost claimed his life. Years of voracious drinking caught up with Flett, who soon sought the help of Edmonton Oiler GM Glen Sather and owner Peter Pocklington. They helped Flett check into a Betty Ford clinic and cleaned up his act.

Despite not touching a drink in over 6 years, Flett was about to pay yet again for his previous drinking habits. In May 1999, Cowboy went to a hospital with what he thought was a severe case of heartburn.

"Which I couldn't understand, getting heartburn because I don't have a heart,'' joked Flett.

Although he says he hadn't touched anything stronger than non-alcoholic beer in recent years, Flett's previous lifestyle of hard partying and heavy drinking finally caught up with him. He was informed by doctors that he had become so violently ill, he could have died had he not immediately gone to a hospital.

It turned out to be a gall bladder attack. Two operations later, his condition was considered to be stable, but he was in dire need of an immediate liver transplant.
"The gall bladder problem has caused liver failure, which is the stupid thing to me. If I had drank ... but I haven't even snuck one," sighed Flett. "Nothing stronger than non-alcoholic beer."

Eighteen days later, Bill got the needed liver transplant. However complications from the surgery took Flett's life at the age of 55.

Bill Flett was born in Vermillion, Alberta in July 1943. Before long Bill began to play hockey. Bill's father, C.M. Flett, played professional hockey in Los Angeles and Spokane in the old Western League and with Baltimore of the Eastern League.
Bill inherited his father's love of hockey, but he also took a liking to rodeos as a kid.

"They have rodeos for kids, and I started riding as a teen-ager, " Bill said. "All the guys played football, hockey, and baseball together during the school year and rode in rodeos together in the summer. We tried wrestling steers, riding broncos, and roping calves from quarter horses."

It now becomes obvious how the nickname "Cowboy" came about. If you ever met the man off the ice it was pretty obvious too. He wore typical cowboy attire including his trademark black hat with a feather in it. Add to that his common cowboy boots, jeans and thick black beard, and Bill Flett looked like he should be fighting cattle, not NHL tough guys. Bill even wore his cowboy boots on the golf course, and later in life wore spurs on his skates for old timer hockey charity games.

For much of the mid-1960s Flett was a much traveled minor leaguer who benefited greatly from NHL expansion in 1967. After graduating from the SJHL's Melville Millionaires, Bill traveled through several minor league cities. Making stops in Rochester, Charlotte, Tulsa, Denver and Victoria before landing with the expansion Los Angeles Kings in 1967-68.

Cowboy played 4 and 1/2 seasons in Hollywood, proving to be an early fan favorite in the non-traditional hockey market. He showed a good offensive upside too, scoring 26 and 24 goals in his first two seasons in L.A. However his production slowly fell as the Kings aged, and was traded to Philadelphia in 1972.

It was a great move for Flett. In his first full season in Philly, Flett scored a career high 43 goals and 74 points while playing often on a line with superb playmaker Bobby Clarke. The next year, 1973-74, Flett's production fell to just 17 goals as he was moved to another line, yet he helped the Flyers win their first Stanley Cup. In game 2 of the Stanley Cup Finals against the Boston Bruins, Flett assisted on two of Bobby Clarke's goals including the game winner. This was the first time in six and half years that the Flyers beat the Bruins in the Boston Garden. The Flyers gained home ice advantage and went on to win the Stanley Cup. The team's first and the NHL's first expansion team to win Lord Stanley's Cup.

Flett didn't have long to celebrate the victory. The Flyers moved Flett to Toronto shortly after the season was over. Flett, who was originally property of the Toronto Maple Leafs, only played one season in Toronto before joining the Atlanta Flames for two years. He later joined the WHA Edmonton OIlers where he regained his scoring touch in 2 1/2 seasons in the WHA.

Flett returned to the NHL when the Oilers joined the NHL in 1979. However he appeared in only 20 games as he suffered badly broken ribs. He decided to retire and accept general manager Glen Sather's offer to become a scout.

Flett scored 202 goals and 215 assists in 689 NHL games. He also added 103 goals in 195 WHA games. Not bad for a man who once said that if he didn't make the NHL in 4 seasons he'd return to Alberta and become a full time rancher.

"I believe cowboys are the toughest athletes in the world," Bill once said. "A cowboy has no guarantees, no contracts. He pays all his own expenses, all his own entry fees. He rides healthy and rides hurt. Rodeo cowboys have a pain tolerance that is hard to believe. I thought hockey players were tough until I rodeoed."


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11-02-2013, 11:03 PM
  #144
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Pekka Majamarki
defense




• Shoots: Left • Height: 6-1 • Weight: 207 lbs. •
• Born: December 18, 1947 • Tampere, Finland •
• Played: 1964/65 - 1983/84 (Finland) •
• Hall of Fame: 1990 (Finland) \\\ 1998 (IIHF) •



Championships
1975 Championship (SM Sarja)
1977 Championship (SM Liiga)
1979 Championship (SM Liiga)
1982 Championship (SM Liiga)
1984 Championship (SM Liiga)

All-Star Teams
1975 World Championships All-Star Team
1974-1975 SM-Sarja All-Star Team
1975-1976 SM-Liiga All-Star Team
1977-1978 SM-Liiga All-Star Team

Honors
1975 Finnish Player of the Year
1975 SM-Sarja Lynces Academici Defenseman Award
1975 Best Defenseman (World Championships)
1977 Best Defenseman (Izevestia Tournament)



Achievements
• Games Played
- Career Finland • 476
- Career PLAYOFFS • 50
- Career International • 251

• Goals
1974-75 SM-Sarja 16 (1 for Defensemen)
1975 World Championships 6 (1 for Defensemen)
1975-76 SM-Liiga 9 (T3 for Defensemen)
1976-77 SM-Liiga 14 (1 for Defensemen)
1977-78 SM-Liiga 14 (2 for Defensemen)
- Career Finland • 125
- Career PLAYOFFS • 14
- Career International • 40

• Assists
1974-75 SM-Sarja 9 (T4 for Defensemen)
1975-76 SM-Liiga 11 (T5 for Defensemen)
1976-77 SM-Liiga 12 (3 for Defensemen)
1977-78 SM-Liiga 14 (T4 for Defensemen)
- Career Finland • 129
- Career PLAYOFFS • 16
- Career International • 25

• Points
1974-75 SM-Sarja 25 (2 for Defensemen)
1975 World Championships 8 (1 for Defensemen / T13 overall )
1975-76 SM-Liiga 20 (T3 for Defensemen)
1976-77 SM-Liiga 26 (2 for Defensemen)
1977-78 SM-Liiga 28 (2 for Defensemen)
- Career Finland • 254
- Career PLAYOFFS • 30
- Career International • 65



Accolades

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finnish Hockey Hall of Fame

Defenceman Pekka Marjamäki’s blueline slapshot was the most fearful weapon of the Finnish Lions in the 1970’s. In a national team career spanning two Olympic Games and 10 World Championship tournaments Marjamäki scored a total of 40 goals and 65 points.

Pekka Marjamäki was only 16 when made his league debut at Tappara in his home town Tampere in 1964. He stayed loyal to Tappara all through his career except for a two-year spell at HV-71 in Sweden in 1979-81.

Marjamäki’s best year was 1975. After winning the first of his five Finnish championship titles with Tappara he scored six goals for Finland at the World Championships in West Germany and was named Best Defender of the tournament. At the end of the year he was duly elected Hockey Player of the Year in Finland.

Pekka Marjamäki In 1998 Marjamäki became the second Finnish player to be inducted into the IIHF Hall of Fame.


Quote:
Originally Posted by St. Joseph's Gazette / US coach Bob Johnson - 2/12/1976

The Finns' second goal which tied the match wasn't his fault/ It was a brilliant move by Pekka Marjamaki, their world class all-star team defender, who scored on a break when we were shorthanded....
Quote:
Originally Posted by World Hockey Archives

PEKKA MARJAMAKI (7), who spent most his time with Tappara Tampere but did skate two seasons with HV 71 Jonkoeping in the Swedish top flight, still holds a share of the all-time mark for Finland defenseman having shot 17 goals at major international tournaments over the course of his accomplished career.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NHL.com

Ice hockey became a fully professionalized sport in Finland in 1975, with the creation of the SM-liiga. Not surprisingly, the Finns did not emerge as a major power on the international hockey scene for almost another 15 years, as there was a steep drop-off in its talent depth beyond NHL-caliber stars such as Matti Hagman, Jari Kurri and Pekka Rautakallio when compared to the mighty Soviet Union, Canadian, Czechoslovakian and Swedish teams.

During the transitional years of Finnish hockey, few stars burned brighter than Tappara Tampere defenseman Pekka Marjamaki, who died earlier this month at the age 64 after suffering a fatal heart attack. While he was later surpassed by Teppo Numminen as the greatest defenseman to emerge from the city of Tampere, "Marja" enjoyed a sterling career of his own.

A member of the International Ice Hockey Federation Hall of Fame (inducted in 1998, becoming the first Finn after goaltender Urpo Ylonen to be so honored) and the Finnish Hockey Hall of Fame (inducted 1990), Marjamaki's No. 3 jersey hangs in the rafters of Tappara's famous Hakemetsä Ice Hall as a retired number.

"Pekka Marjamaki was one of the players that I grew up admiring," Numminen said in a 2009 interview for YLE. "He played the game with a lot of skill and character."

During the recently completed 2012 IIHF World Championships, a moment of silence was held in Helsinki's Hartwall Arena in memory of Marjamaki before Finland's game with France. Members of the Finnish team wore black armbands to mourn the legendary defenseman's passing.

The prime of Marjamaki's career unfolded in the early to mid-1970s, overlapping with the emergence of center Hagman as the first Finnish-trained player to reach the NHL as well as the World Hockey Association careers of forward Veli-Pekka Ketola and defenseman Heikki Riihiranta . During those years, Marjamaki was perennially a key member of Team Finland's blue line. He was one of the national team's players who more than held his own when pitted against elite-caliber competition.

A silky smooth skater and offensively gifted talent who played with an occasional physical edge, Marjamaki suited up in 10 IIHF World Championships between 1967 and 1979 as well as the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. Following a 14-season stint with Tappara, with whom he won three championships, Marjamaki departed for Sweden. After two years with HV 71 Jonkoping, the Tampere native returned home to conclude his career with two more seasons for Tappara before hanging up his skates in 1984.

Marjamaki was one of the last Finnish stars to get his start in the era of outdoor hockey and amateur-only teams in his homeland. While growing up in Tappara, the local team was the predominant club in Finland, winning five championships between 1952-53 and '1960-61. At the age of 16, Marjamaki graduated from Tappara's junior to senior team. Three years later, he made his international debut at the 1967 World Championships in Vienna.

During the latter part of the 1960s, Tappara's on-ice fortunes took a downturn. However, under the leadership of new head coach Kalevi Numminen (Teppo's father) and Marjamaki's on-ice brilliance, the club returned to the top the league in the 1970s.

The defenseman's peak season came in 1974-75. That year, the 27-year-old won the championship with Tappara, took league MVP honors and was named to the World Championships All-Star team after scoring six goals and eight points in 10 games.

After the season, the player reportedly received an NHL offer from the Minnesota North Stars, as well as a pair of offers from WHA clubs. He turned down the invitations.

"The timing was not right for me for leave," Marjarmaki said in 1998. "It was not common yet for Finnish players to go over there."


After the formation of the SM-Liiga in 1975, Marjamaki won two more championships with Tappara in 1976-77 and 1978-79. His best individual statistical season was 1976-77, in which he compiled 26 points (14 goals, 12 assists) and 31 penalty minutes in 32 regular-season games. In the playoffs, he added three goals and seven points in just six games.

In the summer of 1979, Marjamaki finally decided the time was right to try his fortunes in another country, signing with Swedish team HV 71 Jonkoping.

"It was definitely a new situation," Marjamaki recalled in a 2011 interview for HV 71's official website. "In Finland, everything was very secure without any problems. In Jonkoping, it was the opposite. Tappara was a top team in Finland, but HV 71 were newcomers in Elitserien. Many people had high expectations for the team and the new players who were brought in. It was a little tough in the beginning. I couldn't speak Swedish – I still can't – and the playing system was a little different than in Finland. It helped to have some other Finns (Jukka Koskilahti and Hannu Lassila) on the team. They could speak Swedish and told me how things worked. There was also a difference in the training. We trained harder in Finland. But we had a good coach in HV 71 and we intensified our training and continually got better as a team."

At the age of 34, Marjamaki returned to play for Tappara. Although he was effective his first season back with the club, injuries caught up with him the following year. He retired after playing just 13 regular-season and three playoff games in 1983-84. Following his retirement, he stayed close to the Tappara organization, serving as an assistant coach for much of the 1990s as well as a brief stint in 2005.

Although most closely associated with Tappa, Marjamaki remained a respected figure throughout the Finnish and international hockey communities for the remainder of his life.


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Old
11-03-2013, 06:23 PM
  #145
Rob Scuderi
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Ran McDonald, RW

PCHA Goals: 3rd (1913), 3rd (1915), 6th (1914) 8th (1912)
PCHA All-Star in 1912, 1913, 1914*, PCHA Second All-Star 1916
*listed in this thread with note that it was from Total Hockey, but not Trail

Played point, coverpoint, and some center during his career

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sun - 11/23/1914
In Kenny Mallen, Cyclone Taylor and Ran McDonald the Pacific coast hockey league boasts three of the fastest and most dazzling players in the game. McDonald goes to the Rose city along with the other New Westminster stars and in the opinion of close students of the game he is in for the best season of his hockey career. He was with the Royals when they cage-walked to the championship during the first season of ice hockey on the coast, but the following year he fell off in his form. This season he is particularly anxious to get into the limelight again. He is perhaps the fastest man on the Portland team this season, a fine skater, clever stickhandler and at all times dangerous. Last season his rushing tactics worried the opposing defence and even Si Griffis admitted that McDonald had the others beaten when it came down to rushes and shooting. Besides being a valuable player, McDonald is a capable referee. He will probably be the choice when Victoria and Vancouver teams are clashing this season.

Portland will have a forward line this season that will keep the other teams hustling. McDonald, Oatman and Tobin are three speed fiends who have developed a combination that will take some beating. McDonald and Oatman figured prominently in the scoring records last season and it was not due to any fault of this pair that New Westminster did not finish in front.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sun - 12/16/1914
Ran McDonald is another player who is playing up to his 1912 form, when he proved the sensation of the league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spokane Daily Chronicle - 1/6/1917
Ran McDonald and Kenny Mallen dished up an article of speed skating which was sensational. Time after time the little fellows grabbed the puck in front of their own goal and carried it the length of the ice through practically the entire Seattle team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - 3/29/1918
Vancouver displayed brillliant form, the combinations being lightning fast, their shooting deadly, and in addition they back-checked like fiends, McDonald being particularly brilliant in this respect, while McKay ran him a close second.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald - 3/27/1918
There were two stars on each side - McKay and Ran McDonald for the challengers....McDonald, used as substitute in the first game, was responsible for all the visitors' goals. He scored one himself and on the other two, after his rushes were turned into the corner, passed the rubber to Taylor, who each time waited in front of Holmes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Toronto World - 3/27/1918
Ran McDonald came to life and was easily the best man for the visitors. He was responsible for all of the Vancouver goals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - 10/20/1915
Ran McDonald, the fast Portland player, last year was drafted to Victoria, and has already signed a contract to play with the Aristocrats this year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sun - 12/14/1914
Ran McDonald, who is a veteran and has played at centre, will be shifted from right wing to this position.

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11-04-2013, 12:07 PM
  #146
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Joe Cooper
defense




• Shoots: Right • Height: 6-2 • Weight: 200 lbs. •
• Born: December 14, 1914 • Winnipeg, Manitoba •
• Played: 1935/36 - 1946/47 (NHL) \\\ 1947/48 (AHL) \\\ 1934/35 (EAHL) \\\ 1935/36 (Can-Am) \\\ 1938/39 (IAHL) \\\ 1942/43 - 1943/44 (OCHL/QSHL) •
• Hall of Fame: 1990 (Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame) •



Championships
1936 (CAHL)
1943 Allan Cup

All-Star Teams
1935 EAHL First Team All-Star
1936 CAHL First Team All-Star

Honors
Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame



Achievements
• Games Played
- Career NHL • 420
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 35

• Goals
- Career NHL • 30

• Assists
1934-35 EAHL 14 (3)
- Career NHL • 66

• Points
1934-35 EAHL 19 (3 / 1 among defensemen)
1943 10 Allan Cup (3 among defensemen)
- Career NHL • 96

• PIMs
1934-35 EAHL 70 (1)
1935 EAHL PLAYOFFS 16 (T1)
1935-36 CAHL 86 (3)
1937 NHL PLAYOFFS 12 (T3)
1937-38 NHL 56 (6)
1939-40 NHL 59 (6)
1940-41 NHL 66 (4)
1941-42 NHL 58 (7)
1943 Allan Cup 18 (7 / 2 among defensemen)
1944 NHL PLAYOFFS 18 (1)
1944-45 NHL 50 (4)
1945-46 NHL 46 (6)
- Career NHL • 442



Accolades

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey

In 1934-35, 20-year-old Joe Cooper began his pro hockey career in New York playing in the EHL. In 21 games he had five goals and 19 points while racking up 70 minutes in penalties. At 6'1" and 200 pounds, Cooper was one of the biggest and strongest players of his day, and he used his physical superiority whenever possible.

In 1935-36, he joined the Philadelphia Ramblers of the CAHL where he was known as one of the toughest opponents to play against. Many opposing forwards dreaded having to rush the net, or, even worse, face Cooper along the back boards. He had a one-game tryout with the NHL's New York Rangers and impressed team officials.

The Rangers recognized this toughness and put him on their roster for the 1936-37 season. In 48 games, he picked up three assists and 42 minutes in penalties. The following season, he scored his first three NHL goals.

In 1938-39, Cooper joined the Chicago Blackhawks but played the majority of the year back in Philadelphia with the Ramblers in the IAHL. In 1939-40, Cooper started 44 games for the Blackhawks where he scored four goals and eleven points. He played another five years in a Blackhawks' uniform before returning to the New York Rangers in 1946-47.

Cooper played one final year of professional hockey in the AHL in 1947-48 with St. Louis-Hershey. In 414 NHL games, he netted 30 goals and 96 points.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier

Joe Cooper was a Winnipeg born defenseman who started and finished his NHL career with the New York Rangers. But the bulk of his career came in the years between in Chicago. He also played in Ottawa with the Commandos hockey team as part of his service in World War II.

Cooper (who actually overcame a scary fractured skull injury early in his career) was a solid, competent but unspectacular defender.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald - 1/8/1941

Best Scrap In Two Years As Hawks Win

Joe Cooper and Phil Watson Start Brawl In National Hockey League Game at Garden

The most serious fight that a hockey game at Madison Square Garden has produced in two years left a trail of bruises and cuts, but no serious injuries, among Chicago Black Hawks and New York Rangers today.

The NHL teams thrilled 11,125 spectators with a lusty exhibition of fist swinging last nigh, that delayed their game 10 minutes in the second period. After it was all over, the Hawks won 3-2 to climb into a tie for fourth place and five major penalties were in the records.

Trouble flared briefly in the first period, when Joe Cooper, a former Ranger, now defenceman for Chicago, swung his stick to Phil Watson's head after the Ranger centre had given him an elbow. Watson lay stretched on the ice for a minute but was aided to the bench and quickly felt ready for renewed action.

A few seconds after XXXXXXX scored in the second period, Watson and Cooper tangled. They were quickly separated and moved off toward the penalty box. But when they neared the Rangers' bench they went at it again.

.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette - 2/2/1945

Habs Battle Hawks To One-All Tie

Defensive Hockey Stymies Canadiens - Draw Stops Win Streak at Nine Games

Chicago Black Hawks, playing strictly defensive hockey stopped the consecutive win-streak of Canadiens at nine games by holding them to a 1-1 tie at the Forum last night before 9,761 paying customers......

......Mike Karakas was also good in the other net and the Black Hawk rearguards, led by Joe Cooper and XXXX XXXXX, played the best game they have shown all season.

......The Hawks finally evened the count at 19:35 when Bill Mosienko dug up XXXXX XXXXX's rebound to lift it over a prostrate Durnan. Joe Cooper was credited with an assist.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald - 3/2/1944

......Chicago, on the other hand, has shown signs of life since acquiring defenceman Joe Cooper.


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11-04-2013, 01:41 PM
  #147
BubbaBoot
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Kristian Huselius
left wing




• Shoots: Left • Height: 6'2" • Weight: 184 lbs. •
• Born: November 10, 1978 • Osterhaninge, Sweden •
• Draft: Florida • 2nd round (47th overall) • 1997 NHL Entry • from: Farjestads BK Karlstad (Sweden) •
• Played: 2001/02 - 2011/12 (NHL) \\\ 1996/97 - 2000/01, 2004/05, 2012/13 (SEL) •



Championships
1997 Championship SEL
1998 Championship SEL

International Medals
1996 Bronze U18 European Junior Championships
2001 Bronze World Championships
2002 Bronze World Championships
2009 Bronze World Championships

Awards
2000-01 MVP "Guldhjamen" (Golden Helmet) SEL

All-Star Games
99-00 SEL

All-Star Teams
2000-01 All-Star 1st Team SEL
2001-02 All-Rookie Team NHL

NHL All-Star Team Voting
06-07 (T17)

Lady Byng Trophy Voting
06-07 (7), 07-08 (one 2nd place vote)

Selke Trophy Voting
06-07 (one 3rd place vote / one 4th place vote)

Calder Trophy Voting
2001-02 (3rd)



Achievements
• Games Played
- Career NHL • 662
- Career SEL • 223
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 24

• Goals
1999-00 SEL 21 (T8)
2000-01 SEL 32 (1)
- Career NHL • 190
- Career SEL • 79


• Assists
2000-01 SEL 35 (1)
2004-05 SEL 35 (1)
- Career NHL • 261
- Career SEL • 101

• Points
1999-00 SEL 44 (T12)
2000-01 SEL 67 (1)
2000-01 SEL 49 (2)
- Career NHL • 451
- Career SEL • 180

• Points Per Game
2004-05 SEL 1.44 (1)- 14 goals / 35 assists / 49 total points / 34 games (missed tying the SEL lead by one point)
- Career NHL • 0.68
- Career SEL • 0.77
- Career WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS • 0.85 (33 games / 15 goals / 13 assists / 28 total points)



• career team records •
Florida Panthers (NHL) - games (28) / goals (14) / EV goals (14) / PP goals (T18) / assists (41) / points (17)
Calgary Flames (NHL) - goals (40) / EV goals (T44) / PP goals (T25) / assists (41) / playoff assists (T17) / points (41) / +/- (T26)



Accolades

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey

Kristian Huselius was born November 10, 1978 in Osterhaninge, Sweden. The 2nd choice, 47th overall selection of the Florida Panthers in the 1997 NHL Entry Draft, Huselius played two seasons with Farjestads BK in the Swedish Elite League and European Hockey League before joining Vastra Frolunda in 1998-99.

A finesse player who is most effective around the net, Huselius' 1998-99 season was split between Vastra Frolunda and Farjestad before spending the entire 1999-2000 season with Vastra Frolunda. In his first full season with the team, Huselius led his team in goals (21) and points (44) before leading the Swedish Elite League in goals (32), assists (35), points (67), power play goals (10), shorthanded goals (5) and game-winning goals (9) during the 2000-01 season, thus marking the first time a player has swept all six categories in Swedish Elite League history and it is believed to be a first in any major European league.

In his first season with the Panthers, the Osterhaninge, Sweden native led the Panthers in goals 23 and finished third in points with 45. Huselius continued to be an important player for the Panthers in 2002-03, again surpassing the 20 goal mark and finishing third in team scoring. Followin a 31 point season in 2003-04 and lockout year the next, Huselius returned to his homeland and had a strong campaign in 2004-05.

Coming off a strong season in the SEL, Huselius returned to the Panthers in 2005-06, yet was dealt to the Calgary Flames in the early stages of the season. After a great start in Calgary in 2005-06, Huselius set new career highs in points (77), goals (34) and assists (43) while finishing second on the team in goal scoring. The following season his numbers dwindled somewhat, and in the summer of 2008 he signed with the Columbus Blue Jackets.

On the International stage, Huselius represented Sweden at the 2000 and 2001 World Championships capturing a bronze medal in 2000 and the 1997 and 1998 World Junior Championships.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiki

Huselius' hometown is Haninge, a town near Stockholm. He was drafted 47th overall at the 1997 NHL Entry Draft by the Florida Panthers and entered the NHL in 2002. A fast, skillful playmaker, Huselius typically plays on the wings, and spent the early part of his career in the Swedish Elitserien, playing for Hammarby IF, Färjestads BK and Frölunda.

B]The Panthers traded him to the Calgary Flames on December 2, 2005,[1] where he managed 39 points in 54 games, adjusting well despite fears by some analysts that he would not fit into Calgary's physical, defensive playing style.[/B][citation needed] In the 2006–07 NHL season, he held a point-streak of fifteen games, second-highest in the NHL that season. Huselius also garnered a career-high 77 points that season, scoring 34 goals and adding 43 assists. During the 2007–08 season Huselius recorded his first NHL hat trick against the Tampa Bay Lightning.

On July 2, 2008, Huselius signed a 4-year, $19 million contract with the Columbus Blue Jackets.[2] He recorded 21 goals during his first season with the Blue Jackets and also scored a goal during the Blue Jackets first round playoff loss at the hands of the Detroit Red Wings; it was the Blue Jackets first ever appearance in the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Huselius played in only 33 games for Columbus after tearing a chest muscle.

Following the 2011-2012 season he was released. On August 23rd, Huselius stated that the Blue Jackets had rushed his recovery, and that he didn't have enough time to recover. He stated that he was forced into game action too early and that resulted in him pulling his groin muscle and forcing him to miss the rest of the season with a slow recovery. On January 8, 2013, just days after the NHL lockout ended, Huselius announced his retirement due to injury.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey News.com Scouting Report

Assets: Has tremendous vision and playmaking ability. Is incredibly shifty and often makes opponents miss with their bodychecks. Possesses plenty of scoring prowess.
Flaws: *Is prone to getting hurt, and is a bit soft overall. Doesn't always keep his intensity level on high. Could still use more bulk on his 6-2 frame.
Career Potential: *Fragile and inconsistent scoring winger.
*PLEASE NOTE: Don't know the exact date of this analysis but up until 2010/11 season, for the previous 9 seasons he missed 35 total games, (just under 4 gms/season avg), playing in 95% of his teams games.


Last edited by BubbaBoot: 11-05-2013 at 01:36 PM.
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Old
11-05-2013, 12:54 PM
  #148
BubbaBoot
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Eddie Johnston
goalkeeper




• Catches: Left • Height: 6'0" • Weight: 190 lbs. •
• Born: November 24, 1935 • Montreal, Quebec •
• Played: 1962/63 - 1977/78 (NHL) \\\ 1956/57-1961/62, 1965/66 (WHL) \\\ 1953/54 - 1957/58 (QHL / QJHL) \\\ 1959/60 (EHL) \\\ 1960/61 (EPHL) •



Championships
1960 Championship EHL
1961 Championship EPHL
1970 Stanley Cup NHL
1972 Stanley Cup NHL
*note:1962, lost WHL Championship series that went 7 games.

Honors
1960 EHL First All-Star Team
1961 EPHL First All-Star Team
1962 WHL Second All-Star Team

NHL All-Star Voting
- 63-64 (4) / 64-65 (6) / 65-66 (5) / 66-67 (8)

Hart Trophy Voting
- 63-64 (T10 - tied with Tim Horton)

Lady Byng Voting
- 75-76 (1 vote)

Calder Trophy Voting
- 62/63 (4th)



Achievements
• Games
1962-63 NHL 50 (4)
1963-64 NHL 70 (1) * Last NHL GK to play every game in a season.
1964-65 NHL 47 (3)
1965-66 NHL 33 (7)
1966-67 NHL 34 (5)
1972-73 NHL 45 (10)
- Career NHL • 592 (43rd all-time)
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 18

• Wins
1962-63 NHL 11 (7)
1963-64 NHL 18 (6)
1964-65 NHL 11 (7)
1965-66 NHL 10 (7)
1966-67 NHL 8 (10)
1969-70 NHL 16 (9)
1970-71 NHL 30 (2)
1971-72 NHL 27 (3)
1972-73 NHL 24 (5)
- Career NHL • 236 (54th all-time)
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 7

• Ties
1962-63 NHL 10 (3)
1963-64 NHL 12 (1)
1964-65 NHL 4 (8)
1965-66 NHL 2 (10)
1969-70 NHL 11 (6)
1975-76 NHL 9 (8)
- Career NHL • 80 (38th all-time)

• GAA
1955 QJHL PLAYOFFS 2,84 (1)
1960 EHL 2.69 (2)
1960 EHL PLAYOFFS 1.92 (1)
1961 EPHL 2.69 (2)
1961 EPHL PLAYOFFS 1.89 (1)
1962 WHL 3.30 (4)
1962-63 NHL 3.98 (8)
1963-64 NHL 3.01 (5)
1964-65 NHL 3.47 (8)
1965-66 NHL 3.72 (10)
1966-67 NHL 3.70 (10)
1969-70 NHL 2.98 (10)
1970-71 NHL 2.53 (6)
1972 NHL PLAYOFFS 1.86 (1)
- Career NHL • 3.25 (76th all-time)
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 3.34

• Shutouts
1962-63 NHL 1 (5)
1963-64 NHL 6 (3)
1964-65 NHL 3 (3)
1965-66 NHL 1 (7)
1969-70 NHL 3 (8)
1970-71 NHL 4 (4)
1971-72 NHL 2 (10)
1972-73 NHL 5 (3)
1973-74 NHL 1 (10)
- Career NHL • 32 (47th all-time)
- Career NHL PLAYOFFS • 1



career stats
gms W L T/0TL GAA SAVE % SO G A PIMs
NHL 592 234 257 80 3.25 32   
NHL PLAYOFFS 18 7 10 3.34 1  
WHL 1748283 83.42 7   
Juniors 145515173.67 6   
EPHL 704120 92.67 11   
EHL 63   2.68 4   

all-time team records
Boston Bruins (NHL) - games (T2) / playoff games (13) / wins (5) / playoff wins (13) / Ties-OTL (4) / GAA (32) / SOs (4) / mins. (3)



Accolades

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey

The career of netminder Eddie Johnston straddled the NHL's Original Six and Expansion eras. He also witnessed first hand the transformation of the Boston Bruins from league doormats to Stanley Cup champions. Overall, he played in nearly 600 regular season games and was considered a steady if unspectacular player.

The Montreal native worked his way through the Quebec junior ranks with the Junior Royals, Trois Rivieres Flambeaux and Junior Canadiens. He also suited up briefly for two senior outfits, the Chatham Maroons and the Amherst Ramblers. Johnston signed on with the Boston Bruins organization and began his pro career with the WHL's Winnipeg Warriors in 1956-57. The next season he played for the Shawinigan Cataracts and led the Quebec Hockey League in wins, shutouts and minutes played.

After leading the EPHL in wins and shutouts in 1960-61 and topping the WHL in victories the next year, the Bruins gave him a shot at the big leagues. Johnston received plenty of work in the early stages of his NHL career since Boston continually battled the New York Rangers to stay out of the league's basement. Still, in the days when there were only six full time NHL goalkeepers, it was a major accomplishment for Johnston to suit up for the Bruins regardless of how bad they were. In only his second season, the young backstopper played in all 70 of the Bruins' games, one of the last players of his time to do so. Johnston was also one of the last goalies to adopt a face mask after he was hit by a Bobby Orr shot in pre-game warm up in 1965.

Johnston was on hand as the Bruins built around the likes of Orr, Phil Esposito and Johnny Bucyk to become a league power in the late 1960s. By this time he was playing nearly 40 games a season but was definitely the "number 2" goalie behind Gerry Cheevers. The Bruins won the Stanley Cup in 1970 with Johnson as the second stringer. Two years later he led all post-season netminders with six wins and a 1.86 goals against average as the Bruins won their second title in three seasons. A few months later, Johnston was honoured by being named the spare goaltender for Team Canada in the Summit Series versus the Soviet Union.

Johnston played the 1972-73 season with Boston but the club faltered in the Stanley Cup quarter-finals with Jacques Plante in net. It turned out that he was the "player-to-be-named-later" in the late-season trade that brought Plante from Toronto to Beantown. Johnston split the Toronto goaltending chores with Doug Favell and Dunc Wilson in 1973-74 then was traded to St. Louis for Gary Sabourin. He played over three years for a Blues team that was fairly weak in their own zone. He was sold to Chicago in January 1978 and played four regular season games before retiring at the age of 42.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inside Hockey

Johnston played fifteen seasons in the NHL as a goaltender. Johnston was a solid but unspectacular net-minder who has gone down in history as being the last NHL goaltender to play every minute of every game during an entire season. During the 1963-64 season Johnston played all 4200 minutes—and he did so without a facemask. When asked in a 2008 interview how was he able to tend goal without a mask? He answered with self-deprecating terseness, “stupidity.”

In truth he was courageous and tough. In a game against the Detroit Red Wings he was hit in the head with the puck and knocked comatose for several days. In another game against the Chicago Blackhawks he was hit high atop his forehead by a Bobby Hull slap-shot resulting in blood and stitches. He later said that if the shot had struck him any lower he would have been killed. Nevertheless he came back and resumed his net-minding duties; not donning a facemask until the late 1960s.

Johnston tended goal for the Boston Bruins during their lean years from 1962-1967 before being paired with Gerry Cheevers during their glory years from 1967-1973. Johnston was a staunch presence for the Bruins: serving as mentor to the rookie Bobby Orr and other young players while helping the Bruins win two Stanley Cups in 1970 and 1972.

After 1973 Johnston was traded from Boston and spent the last five seasons of his career bouncing between the Toronto Maple Leafs, St. Louis Blues, and the Chicago Blackhawks before retiring as a player in 1978.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - 7/26/2009

But mostly, E.J. --- as everybody knows him -- will spend the rest of his days just being E.J., playing a lot of golf, shaking a lot of hands and telling stories from a life in hockey and one of the most remarkable careers in Pittsburgh sports history.

Many of those stories will be about Orr, who joined the Boston Bruins at 18 in 1966 and quickly became the best player in NHL history. Johnston was a goaltender on that Boston club, a high-profile guy known as "Downtown Eddie" because of his love of the nightlife. This was long before Johnston's wife, Diane, and three kids, Michele, E.J. Jr., and Joe came along.

Orr's father asked Johnston if Orr could live with him.

"Ah, I don't know if that's such a good idea, Mr. Orr," Johnston said.

"I insist," Orr's dad said. "It'll be good for the boy."

This is when the stories really get good.

"Bobby would drive me into town every night in my Cadillac," Johnston said. "He'd go to a movie or something and then pick me up at the bars. I'd hop into the backseat and he'd drive us home. I ended up buying him a chauffeur's hat. He'd wear the thing. Can you imagine that? The best player in the game by about eight miles doing something like that?"

Orr and Johnston still laugh about those days. They talk at least twice a week by telephone, often reminiscing about their great Bruins' teams that won the Cup in 1970 and '72. One of Johnston's most prized possessions is a limited-edition picture of Orr and fellow Boston legends Ted Williams and Larry Bird that Orr gave him as a gift. The photograph -- autographed by all three Hall of Famers -- has a prominent spot on Johnston's basement/game room wall, not far from pictures of him with Joe DiMaggio, Perry Como and Canada Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, among many others.

"A special guy," Johnston said of Orr.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Hall of Fame Journal

Born and raised in Montreal, Ed was part of the Montreal Canadiens' organization as a teenager, but was sold to the Chicago Black Hawks in September 1959. Although he attended Chicago's training camp that fall, no one was going to usurp Glenn Hall at that junction, so Ed played several seasons in the Western Hockey League, honing his skills and waiting for his break. It came when he was claimed by the Boston Bruins in June 1962.

The Bruins were a woeful club back then, finishing out of the playoffs for three straight years and going through netminders like water. But that, curiously, was good news for Eddie. He was able to step into the Bruins' crease and stayed there until May 1973. During that time, Johnston saw the team evolve from a perennial also-ran (they didn't make the playoffs in Ed's first five seasons with the team) into one of the most successful franchises of that era.


With astute acquisitions, not the least of which were Bobby Orr and Phil Esposito, the Bruins became Stanley Cup champions in 1970 and 1972, with Ed sharing netminding chores with Gerry Cheevers. In fact, Johnston was so impressive that he was selected as one of three goalies — the others were Ken Dryden and Tony Esposito — to play for Team Canada in the landmark Summit Series versus Russia in 1972. Ed didn't see action during the eight-game series, but was an integral member of that team.

Johnston ended his playing career with turns in Toronto, St. Louis and Chicago before retiring at the conclusion of the 1978-79 season. In 591 regular season NHL games, Ed won 236, lost 256 and tied 87 games, with a goals-against average of 3.24. At the time of his retirement, he was ninth in games played by a goaltender, sixteenth wins and sixth in losses. Also of note, Ed was the last National Hockey League goaltender to play every moment of his team's regular season, playing all 70 of Boston's games in 1963-64.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier

In 1963-64 Eddie Johnston played every single minute of all seventy Boston Bruins regular season games. He was the last goalie in hockey history to have a perfect attendance record. And he did it all without a mask.

Not that it came easy. He had four broken noses that season. Twice his eyes were swollen shut so badly that doctors had to apply leeches to his face to suck out the blood so he would be able to see to play the game.

Ah, the good ol' days when goalies did not have a mask.

"No brains, either," Johnston says nowadays.

The man known to everybody as E.J. played in 591 NHL games, compiling a record of 236 wins, 256 losses and 87 ties, adding 32 shutouts, with a goals against average of 3.24. He was a popular teammate who too often played second fiddle to the likes of Gerry Cheevers. As a result hockey history has tended to forget how good he really was.

E.J. spent over 50 years in hockey, 22 as a player and 31 in management. He was best known as a Boston Bruin as a player, winning Stanley Cups in 1970 and 1972. He spent over 25 years in various capacities with the Pittsburgh Penguins as well.


Last edited by BubbaBoot: 02-26-2015 at 10:16 PM.
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Old
11-05-2013, 06:46 PM
  #149
Hedberg
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D Marcus Ragnarsson



6'0, 209 lbs
Shoots Left
37 G, 140 A, 177 Pts in 632 NHL GP

Played in 2001 All-Star Game
2008-09 Elitserien Best Defenceman
1995, 1997 World Championship Silver Medal
Led Sharks in icetime 2001-2003

Elite Prospects:
Quote:
An experienced defenseman with good hands, puck control and skating. Understands the game well and gives a good opening pass. Shoots well from the blue line. Useful on both powerplay and penalty kill. A large player, but doesn't check very often.
Legends of Hockey
Quote:
With so many years of elite competition already under his belt, Ragnarsson had all of the skills necessary to step right into the Sharks' lineup and add stability to the team.

He did so by establishing himself as a consistent and dependable rearguard who played a sound positional game and made good use of his size to maintain control of his own zone. He also showed great stamina by logging a tone of minutes in key situations.

Ragnarsson opened the 2001-02 campaign at his usual post on the Sharks defense, surrounded by his youthful proteges before being dealt to the Philadelphia Flyers midway through the 2002-03 season. Upon his arrival with the Flyers, Ragnarsson continued his solid play in his own zone and was a key player in helping Philadelphia reach the Eastern Conference Final in 2003-04.

On the international stage Ragnarsson is a two-time member of Sweden's World Championship team (1995 and 1997), a two-time member of it's Olympic Team (1998 and 2002) and a member of it's World Cup team (2004).
James Mirtle:
Quote:
A really underrated blueliner, Marcus Ragnarsson had his best season output-wise in his rookie campaign with the San Jose Sharks, but was a solid defensive defender for all nine of his NHL seasons.

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Old
11-05-2013, 10:34 PM
  #150
seventieslord
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Mike Murphy, RW



- 6'0", 190 lbs
- NHL Captain for 6 Years
- 7 20-goal seasons
- 5 50-point seasons
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1980)
- Killed 36% of penalties for teams 5% below average
- 556 career points, three 60+ point seasons, and four 25+ goal seasons

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1973
Has good size and a hard, accurate shot... fast enough to keep up with Unger, one of the fastest centers around.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OPC 1974-75
He’s a speedy player with good hockey sense. He almost always knows what to do with the puck and how to find the disc in a crowd… he has a determined style of play that is popular with the fans.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1976
Learned aggressive checking under Fred Shero in Omaha...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1977
New breed of captain, in the Bobby Clarke/Jim Schoenfeld mold... spends time on flights pacing the aisles talking with teammates...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1978
falls into the mould of Bobby Clarke - work and inspiration... leadership plus production have placed him as one of the mainstays in Kings' revival...
Quote:
Originally Posted by OPC 1978-79
Mike always gives 100% on the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1979
Even without scoring, he contributes with his leadership and defensive skills... Former coach Bob Pulford eates him among the league's premier two-way players... he's not afraid to dig in the corner for the puck and is a good penalty killer... He calls his play in the defensive zone "the strongest part of my game"...
Quote:
Originally Posted by OPC 1979-80
An extremely hard worker, Mike is an excellent penalty killer with great shots.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1980
Heady, unselfish defensive stalwart...especially effective along the boards, he makes deft use of skates to move puck while fending off opponents with arms.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1981
dependable, hard working winger who checks strongly... a strong leader who has achieved success in hockey through hard work... a much-respected man in NHL circles...
that, with six seasons of NHL captaincy, would be great at this point for a guy who had 200 career points, let alone 556! In fact, he sounds like Mike Keane with 80 more points in 300 fewer games and without all the cups.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Times, November 3rd, 1980
Mike Murphy, an accomplished penalty killer...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, October 15, 1983
"Mike Murphy has provided excellent service to our hockey club over the past 10 years," said McGuire. "As a player, he was a hard worker, a great leader and I'm glad to keep him in our organization…"
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argus Press, March 14, 1974
Apparently, the lady had called a Los Angeles radio station Tuesday saying she would streak, "so that Mike Murphy will see me." About 10 minutes before the game, the well-endowed young lady made good on her promise. Clad only in a Kings cap and carrying a team banner, not even skates, the woman tiptoed onto the ice with security in pursuit... "I appreciate her consideration, but I'm getting married in the near future," Murphy said. "I'd like to thank her for thinking of me, anyway. I wish I could have been there to see it. I haven't seen a streaker yet."

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