HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The History of Hockey
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

What unhealthy/out of shape stars would have benefitted most by being a bit smarter?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
08-31-2013, 12:59 PM
  #26
Hobnobs
Pinko
 
Hobnobs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Country: Sweden
Posts: 4,251
vCash: 500
Smoking is not that bad when you are young tho, it gets worse after 30 so who knows how these players wouldve been but it shouldnt have affected their prime years that much. Alcohol on the other hand.

Hobnobs is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 03:59 PM
  #27
hawkman
.
 
hawkman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 5,709
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
...Hawkman, thats just not the case. Yes some of them had business interests & worked through the summers ...
Killion, that's just not the case. I have the players on video saying they had summer jobs.

__________________
hawkman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 05:09 PM
  #28
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 21,210
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by reckoning View Post
I think he said something similar in his book. Then again, he seemed to have a faulty/exaggerated memory about a lot of things that he wrote there.

I remember hearing somewhere that Dallas Smith had to reject his Summit Series invite because of commitments to his summer job. May or may not be true, but it would seem more believable for Dallas Smith to have to than for Phil Esposito.
No, it makes a lot of sense. Esposito talks in great lengths in his book how he was in the Soo when he got the call that he was traded to Boston. He was in the Soo that summer - 1967 - working on the steel mill. Not crazy at all. The big money came in 1972 for the players. After that no one needed a summer job. Even the stars needed to work in the offseason. Maurice Richard worked during the day at a factory in Montreal in his playing days. I know this is before Esposito's time, but the players really did need to do this up until around 1972 so I believe Esposito for sure.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 06:19 PM
  #29
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 8,301
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
By 1972? I dont think so. I was playing back then & salaries had gotten to the point by 1970'ish that that was no longer a requirement unless you were middle pack or border-line. Sure a lot of guys worked regardless summers, had business interests on-going throughout the season. Esposito had a hockey camp along with several others. Just having a hard time believing he returned to Algoma Steel every summer after scoring 76 goals, helping the Bruins to two Stanley Cups etc.... as in proof please.

Beyond 1965 and including time with the Bruins, like I said, for Phil, and I would expect it would continue until negotiation of new contracts when the previous expired for the vast majority of players.

He won his first Art Ross in 1969. Do you wish to have proof he worked summers after that?

http://www.ohlalumnicentral.com/reso...phil-esposito/

"A fascinating fact for fans who were too young or not even alive when Esposito played the game was that it wasn’t until after his eighth year in the NHL that he no longer had to work during the off-season at a steel plant in Sault Ste. Marie to make ends meet."


Last edited by Crosbyfan: 08-31-2013 at 06:44 PM.
Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 06:51 PM
  #30
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 26,164
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by reckoning View Post
Just curious: are you a former NHL or AHL player? Not asking you to reveal your identity, but it would be cool if there was a former pro player on here to add insights the rest of us wouldn't have.
Close enough. Know plenty of em from my own playing days & through business interests over the years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawkman View Post
Killion, that's just not the case. I have the players on video saying they had summer jobs.
Im not disputing that. Im just not readily believing this particular claim from this particular player. Phil Esposito was a Locker Room Lawyer & knew exactly what everyone was getting paid. Not without ego. Theres no way he wouldve just been subservient, taken whatever Boston offered & that was that. Not a chance. Ive dealt with this guy. You kiddin me? Makes for a great story I'll give it that. "Woe is me, had ta work in a foundry. Twelve bucks an hour. 135 degree's in the ol' steel plant. Yep"....I mean c'mon. All I can think to say is eat me Phil. What a crock.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
No, it makes a lot of sense. Esposito talks in great lengths in his book how he was in the Soo when he got the call that he was traded to Boston. He was in the Soo that summer - 1967 - working on the steel mill. Not crazy at all. The big money came in 1972 for the players. After that no one needed a summer job. Even the stars needed to work in the offseason. Maurice Richard worked during the day at a factory in Montreal in his playing days. I know this is before Esposito's time, but the players really did need to do this up until around 1972 so I believe Esposito for sure.
Ya ok. Up til the Boston trade. I'll accept that. Maybe even until 69, maybe. Prolly had a job hosing down trucks or whatever. Nothing really all that taxing. This is Phil Esposito were talking about, and God love him, but that boy does know how to spin a yarn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crosbyfan View Post
He won his first Art Ross in 1969. Do you wish to have proof he worked summers after that?
Ya. I do. Proof that he worked in a Steel Mill past 1968/69 at the latest. Not buyin it. He knew what Orr was getting, well aware of his own worth, in fact some might say "only too well". Phil Esposito was no pushover in negotiations. Wouldnt just blithely accept whatever was offered. He'd ask questions, make demands, and he had every right to do so. If he "worked" summers in like 70-71-72 & beyond it was at his own damn hockey camp, maybe a guest appearance at someone elses, but there is no way he was bustin his butt up in the Soo perched over a cauldron. No chance.

Killion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 06:55 PM
  #31
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 8,301
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post


Ya. I do. Proof that he worked in a Steel Mill past 1968/69 at the latest. Not buyin it. He knew what Orr was getting, well aware of his own worth, in fact some might say "only too well". Phil Esposito was no pushover in negotiations. Wouldnt just blithely accept whatever was offered. He'd ask questions, make demands, and he had every right to do so. If he "worked" summers in like 70-71-72 & beyond it was at his own damn hockey camp, maybe a guest appearance at someone elses, but there is no way he was bustin his butt up in the Soo perched over a cauldron. No chance.
http://www.ohlalumnicentral.com/reso...phil-esposito/

"A fascinating fact for fans who were too young or not even alive when Esposito played the game was that it wasn’t until after his eighth year in the NHL that he no longer had to work during the off-season at a steel plant in Sault Ste. Marie to make ends meet."

Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 07:03 PM
  #32
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 26,164
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crosbyfan View Post
http://www.ohlalumnicentral.com/reso...phil-esposito/

"A fascinating fact for fans who were too young or not even alive when Esposito played the game was that it wasn’t until after his eighth year in the NHL that he no longer had to work during the off-season at a steel plant in Sault Ste. Marie to make ends meet."
Links not working, searched the site.... nada... Phil breaks in circa 63. 8yrs puts it at 1970.... Far be it for me or anyone else to suggest Phil Esposito might be "makin stuff up". Gosh no. Perish the very thought... Now, I could see him working at Algoma summers through Junior, through the minors, first few years in the NHL with Chicago & even maybe til 68 or 69 but beyond that?... nope. Not seeing it.

Killion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 07:14 PM
  #33
Hardyvan123
tweet@HardyintheWack
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 14,285
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
You think Barry Beck? He was the epitome of a bodybuilder.

I would have to say Guy Lafleur. Smoked a ton of cigarettes. Was a little careless off the ice, getting into a car accident that was carrying a young Wayne Gretzky as the passenger (far as I know Wayne has never confirmed this). Didn't take care of himself and had his last elite year in 1980 when he still should have been the best winger in the game for a while.

As for the players of yesteryear, I think a lot of it had to do with the fact that they all had summer jobs, or some had jobs during the day before the games just to make ends meet. Phil Esposito worked in a steel mill until he was 30 years old in the summers. It isn't that the players weren't still in better shape than the average man, it is just that it was hard to focus on training when you were working on an assembly line.
Phil Espostio is a bad example he thought training camp and getting in shape was drinking a case of beer in the sauna.

Frankly stars of yesteryear didn't have to stay in shape or exercise as much or train as stringently because very few other players did so it was all relative.

Hardyvan123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 07:20 PM
  #34
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 8,301
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Links not working, searched the site.... nada... Phil breaks in circa 63. 8yrs puts it at 1970.... Far be it for me or anyone else to suggest Phil Esposito might be "makin stuff up". Gosh no. Perish the very thought... Now, I could see him working at Algoma summers through Junior, through the minors, first few years in the NHL with Chicago & even maybe til 68 or 69 but beyond that?... nope. Not seeing it.
I did read his book and was a little surprised at some of the "facts" presented...hey wait a minute, I remember that game and that wasn't the score...but always attributed it to his bad memory and worse editing as it did not effect the story, at least the facts I knew were incorrect.

8 years puts Phil there, at the Mill, in the very early seventies. How far could it be off?

Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 07:24 PM
  #35
Hardyvan123
tweet@HardyintheWack
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 14,285
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Links not working, searched the site.... nada... Phil breaks in circa 63. 8yrs puts it at 1970.... Far be it for me or anyone else to suggest Phil Esposito might be "makin stuff up". Gosh no. Perish the very thought... Now, I could see him working at Algoma summers through Junior, through the minors, first few years in the NHL with Chicago & even maybe til 68 or 69 but beyond that?... nope. Not seeing it.
Well if someone , anyone, could get Phil to talk we might actually find out.

Hardyvan123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 07:53 PM
  #36
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 26,164
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardyvan123 View Post
Well if someone , anyone, could get Phil to talk we might actually find out.
... ya. Just try to shut him up. How he walked 13 miles to school through 7 foot snowdrifts in bare feet just to get there. How brother Tony was "the greatest skater Ive ever seen". On & on. No boundaries that one. Great guy. But "revisionary"? Ah, ya, kinda. Even if its happening in real time. Storyteller to put it mildly. Whatevers convenient, or what he thinks is convenient to impress his audience. Real life Hustler was and I suppose still is is Phil Esposito. Extremely amusing individual from the Tall Tale Capital's of the World, Northern Ontario. Like getting loaded with a buddy while fishing and while waiting telling the most outrageous stories you can think of.

Killion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 09:48 PM
  #37
mobilus
Registered User
 
mobilus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: high slot
Posts: 616
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by thom View Post
Guy Lafleur was the fittest player on the canadiens along with Gainey.All physical tests done on Lafleur was close to perfection.Gretzey was opposite his tests as an oiler were less than average.
Gretzky was always top tier for fitness when he played. He came last ("Am I stronger than my mom?") in Oiler physical strength tests, but he was fit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by begbeee View Post
Did not Eddie the Eagle smoke and drink? It must have impact on his reflexes...
Ed Belfour was triathlon quality fit for most of his career. It was one of the reasons Keenan kept him over Hasek in Chicago.

mobilus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 10:09 PM
  #38
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 26,164
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobilus View Post
Ed Belfour was triathlon quality fit for most of his career. It was one of the reasons Keenan kept him over Hasek in Chicago.
Interesting. I dont know that Id actually trust Mike Keenan to tell me the correct time of day when asked but if thats his story, ok, fine.

Killion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 10:39 PM
  #39
Darth Yoda
Registered User
 
Darth Yoda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Grovebranch's Crease
Country: Sweden
Posts: 3,147
vCash: 931
I dont understand the Esposito thing. Maybe he worked at that plant for say the first six years, then either forgot which year he left, counted his minor league years as well by mistake, or he just thought it would be more manly to say eight years instead of six. Especially if he wanted to sell a book by his anecdotes. This guy is obviously mildly crazy, and i'm not only talking about the Tampa Bay years. He likes to talk and laugh it out.


Last edited by Darth Yoda: 08-31-2013 at 10:49 PM.
Darth Yoda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 11:17 PM
  #40
Inkling
"Let's win it all"
 
Inkling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ottawa
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,297
vCash: 500
Bryan Fogarty is another player that comes to mind, but in his case it was not a question of being 'a bit smarter', he had some tragic mental issues that he couldn't overcome.

Inkling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 11:40 PM
  #41
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 21,210
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardyvan123 View Post
Phil Espostio is a bad example he thought training camp and getting in shape was drinking a case of beer in the sauna.

Frankly stars of yesteryear didn't have to stay in shape or exercise as much or train as stringently because very few other players did so it was all relative.
It would be hard to stick to a training regimen when you have a job in the off season though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Im not disputing that. Im just not readily believing this particular claim from this particular player. Phil Esposito was a Locker Room Lawyer & knew exactly what everyone was getting paid. Not without ego. Theres no way he wouldve just been subservient, taken whatever Boston offered & that was that. Not a chance. Ive dealt with this guy. You kiddin me? Makes for a great story I'll give it that. "Woe is me, had ta work in a foundry. Twelve bucks an hour. 135 degree's in the ol' steel plant. Yep"....I mean c'mon. All I can think to say is eat me Phil. What a crock.

Ya ok. Up til the Boston trade. I'll accept that. Maybe even until 69, maybe. Prolly had a job hosing down trucks or whatever. Nothing really all that taxing. This is Phil Esposito were talking about, and God love him, but that boy does know how to spin a yarn.

Ya. I do. Proof that he worked in a Steel Mill past 1968/69 at the latest. Not buyin it. He knew what Orr was getting, well aware of his own worth, in fact some might say "only too well". Phil Esposito was no pushover in negotiations. Wouldnt just blithely accept whatever was offered. He'd ask questions, make demands, and he had every right to do so. If he "worked" summers in like 70-71-72 & beyond it was at his own damn hockey camp, maybe a guest appearance at someone elses, but there is no way he was bustin his butt up in the Soo perched over a cauldron. No chance.
Quotes out of Esposito's book "Thunder and Lightning"

pg. 35 - "When my first daughter Laurie was born August 14, 1965 I wasn't at the hospital with Linda. I was working my shift at the steel plant. We were living with my parents at the time. I ended up working at that steel plant until I was 30 years old."

pg. 54 - In 1967 on his trade to Boston negotiating with GM Milt Schmidt: "I want $12,000 a year."
"Impossible" Milt said.

Eventually Esposito negotiated a deal that gave him $16,500 only because he hit his bonuses. This was the 1967-'68 season. Even taking inflation into account, there is no doubt that isn't enough to support a family especially since you aren't getting paid in the summer. He was working at the mill in the summer of 1967 as well. Probably did it the next year and the year after that. In 1970 the Bruins win the Cup, he is 28 years old at this time. Could have worked in the summer then as well. Maybe got some endorsements after that and perhaps (although this is speculation) he didn't have to work after that. He and Tony cancelled their hockey school in the summer of 1972 for the Summit Series. So when Esposito says he had to work in the summers until he was "30 years old" that isn't far off. He was 30 in 1972. Might have worked in 1971 when he was 29 at the steel mill.

It is very hard to believe in this day and age. Patrick Kane assaults a cabby for pennies, Evander Kane posts a picture of himself with a "money" phone. Even old coots like Alfredsson are turning down $4 million contracts. But this is not how the game always was. Red Kelly was a Senator in Ottawa (sort of like Congress for all you non-Canadians out there). Tim Horton had his own business, and we all know how that turned out.

There is a story of Wayne Cashman giving Bobby Hull free tickets to one of the Summit Series games. Bobby wondered why he was doing this and Cashman simply stated "Thanks to you my salary tripled". So yeah, up until 1972 it isn't hard to believe that players had to work in the off season. Esposito had a family at that time. Hard to believe, but it happened.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 11:48 PM
  #42
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 26,164
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Yoda View Post
This guy is obviously mildly crazy, and i'm not only talking about the Tampa Bay years. He likes to talk and laugh it out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling View Post
Bryan Fogarty is another player that comes to mind, but in his case it was not a question of being 'a bit smarter', he had some tragic mental issues that he couldn't overcome.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Hard to believe, but it happened.
Im sorry Phil but Im with Darth & Inkling flat out. Espo tellin Porkies.

Killion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-31-2013, 11:48 PM
  #43
thom
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 2,266
vCash: 500
Big Phil I agree everything you said except to remind you the average salary for an american men in 1970 was 6800 dollars.So Phil still made 2.5 times the salary of average american.Now I do agree he was underpaid for much of his career but im sure he is doing well

thom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-01-2013, 08:38 AM
  #44
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 8,301
vCash: 500
Don't forget the lifestyle, especially on the road. It may have seemed like "Big Money", making more than the average North American at the time, but these guys had little financial training and all kinds of pressure to spend. Even in the Seventies, as Salaries went up, Inflation would cut int a big part of it, especially for those with longer contracts. So many of them had their work cut out for them to get back in hockey shape when training camp rolled around and probably a few pounds to lose.

IIRC Henderson was one of the few that was in very good shape for the Summit Series, and this had a significant effect on how well he did against the Soviets who of course were all in great physical condition.

I remember reading LLoyd Percivals book back in the late sixties, on physical conditioning and other aspects for hockey, and it was relatively unknown at the time...but the Soviets including Tarasov paid close attention to his ideas.(not that I knew that at the time)


Last edited by Crosbyfan: 09-01-2013 at 08:45 AM.
Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-01-2013, 02:25 PM
  #45
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 21,210
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by thom View Post
Big Phil I agree everything you said except to remind you the average salary for an american men in 1970 was 6800 dollars.So Phil still made 2.5 times the salary of average american.Now I do agree he was underpaid for much of his career but im sure he is doing well
Well, yeah he's doing fine now. He made a lot of money in the 1970s. Not to mention GM of the Rangers, the Lightning deal and such. I'm talking in the pre-WHA days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Im sorry Phil but Im with Darth & Inkling flat out. Espo tellin Porkies.
So what would he be lying about? Isn't that an awfully specific thing to remember that you weren't there for your daughter's birth because you were working at a steel mill? Why even bother bringing that up if it weren't true? Wouldn't that be an easy thing to remember as to WHY you weren't there? I believe the guy was working in the steel mill.

As for the trade in 1967, he was dealt May 15, 1967. Then the draft happened and then Milt called him back to negotiate a contract. Up until then, Esposito was living in the Soo working in the steel plant that summer and after his trade to Boston he was so peeved he was ready to just do that for the rest of his life. So in the summer of 1967 he was working in the steel mill. I don't see how those are lies either.

We have to take other things into consideration here. There was no work in the summer. No pay check. That's a long summer especially considering the Cup final ended in May. You weren't making millions in the late 1960s/early 1970s. You couldn't just sit at home and enjoy the summer. You were making more than the average man, but you still had a family to feed in the summer. Why is it so hard to believe that several players worked in the summers until the time things really changed in 1972?

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-01-2013, 04:30 PM
  #46
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 26,164
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
...is it so hard to believe that several players worked in the summers until the time things really changed in 1972?
No, not at all. Your journeyman players, vast majority of the league likely did just that. But not the top 20%, and Phil Esposito was certainly that by 72, as in top 5%. If he was having to work summers beyond about 1969/70 Id be very surprised.

Killion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-01-2013, 05:16 PM
  #47
jkrx
Registered User
 
jkrx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,337
vCash: 500
No, I'm 99% sure that Espo did not work in a steel mill after got traded to Boston. Phil is pulling one of his glorified tales again, I see. Haven't read his book because of how I remember him telling "things as it is".

jkrx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-01-2013, 06:02 PM
  #48
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 26,164
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkrx View Post
No, I'm 99% sure that Espo did not work in a steel mill after got traded to Boston. Phil is pulling one of his glorified tales again, I see. Haven't read his book because of how I remember him telling "things as it is".
Ya, thats my take on it as well as posted earlier. In 1966 the average NHL salary was app $17,000, Gordie Howe earning $50,000. Orrs' reputed Rookie Salary was $25,000, an unheard of sum in those days & negotiated by an agent, the now infamous Alan Eagleson. Encouraged by his "win" over Eddie Shore in Springfield & representation of Orr, he started the NHLPA, countless dozens of players asking him to represent them, all combined notching salaries up considerably from the previous $17,000 averages to respectable sums.

Famous story of Bob Baun who when arriving in Detroit in 1969 after a year in Oakland had a locker room chat with Howe, that he (Baun) was making $120,000 while Gordie was earning a mere $50,000, and that his conciliatory approach to negotiating with the Wings every year since entering the league actually kept players salaries down. But with the Orr Rookie Contract, Expansion on the horizon, the birth of the NHLPA & Agents getting involved, salaries were increasing substantially. So for a guy like Esposito, well, just no way no how would he have sat still for $25,000 or whatever per annum after he'd left Chicago. In 63/64 the NHL Minimum Salary was $7000, and Esposito was getting paid that in Chicago. In his book he says he didnt make $100,000 until his 8th season playing pro, so that would be about 1969, possibly 1970 that he'd "no longer needed to work summers".

Killion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-01-2013, 07:24 PM
  #49
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 8,301
vCash: 500
I think we need a definite "Phil last worked in th Soo Steel Mill in the Summer of 19XX!" from someone that was there and remembers...preferably not Phil himself.

Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-01-2013, 11:37 PM
  #50
Hardyvan123
tweet@HardyintheWack
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 14,285
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by thom View Post
Big Phil I agree everything you said except to remind you the average salary for an american men in 1970 was 6800 dollars.So Phil still made 2.5 times the salary of average american.Now I do agree he was underpaid for much of his career but im sure he is doing well
I agree I remember my dad buying a house in Vancouver for 5000 around that time, as I was born then and his salary as a carpenter was a little over $1/hour.

Maybe Phil worked at the steel mill until 30 maybe he didn't but 16.5k back then was still a sh*****d of money period.

Hardyvan123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:23 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2015 All Rights Reserved.