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Wasn't it suggested Kopitar play for USA?

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09-03-2013, 06:26 PM
  #1
Ziostilon
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Wasn't it suggested Kopitar play for USA?

I'm sure its not just me. But was it not discussed or even a realistic possibility back around the time of the 2010 Olympics...

It was suggested by the time of this Sochi Olympics, Kopitar would get US citizenship and be eligible to play for Team USA.

Since the US Olympic team is in dire need of top centers

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09-03-2013, 06:39 PM
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butteryslugz
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his home country slovenia qualified for the olympics at sochi. and he'll be representing slovenia at sochi. never heard anything about him representing the US tho.

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09-03-2013, 06:42 PM
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kingsboy11
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That was a possiblity, but Kopitar's #1 priority was to get Slovenia in the Olympics. Now that they are in the Olympics there is no way he is ever going to play for the US. Especially since he is going to play with his brother and his dad is coaching. Kopitar loves living here, but his heart will always be with Slovenia.

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09-03-2013, 06:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziostilon View Post
I'm sure its not just me. But was it not discussed or even a realistic possibility back around the time of the 2010 Olympics...

It was suggested by the time of this Sochi Olympics, Kopitar would get US citizenship and be eligible to play for Team USA.

Since the US Olympic team is in dire need of top centers
Please start Olympic threads in the appropriate forum.

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09-03-2013, 07:07 PM
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Billy6
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I'm pretty sure that Kopitar already played for Slovenia in an IIHF tourney thus making him ineligible to play for anyone else. Bobby Holik tried to do that and was denied.

I think this is a good rule by the IIHF. Guys shouldn't just be able to play for another country that they weren't born in, spent a large chunk of their youth in, or who don't have a parent who was born in that country. Allowing that to happen would severely cheapen international hockey.

I can remember Peter Stastny and Petr Nedved playing for Canada and I never agreed with it. They're not Canadian. They weren't born here or trained here and shouldn't have been allowed to play for Canada.

Think of how many Canadians play in the States for the majority of their careers and eventually get US citizenship. Could you imagine what it would be like if a Gretzky or Lemieux or Yzerman had decided to suit up for the Americans at the end of their careers? That would have been stupid and would have completely turned me off of watching International hockey.

In no way am I against dual citizens playing both sides like Brett Hull, Adam Deadmarsh, or Tyler Myers. That's a completely different scenerio.


Last edited by Billy6: 09-03-2013 at 07:17 PM.
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09-05-2013, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy6 View Post
I'm pretty sure that Kopitar already played for Slovenia in an IIHF tourney thus making him ineligible to play for anyone else. Bobby Holik tried to do that and was denied.
There are plenty of players who played for two different countries. The rules allow it as long as said player has played for 4 consecutive seasons in his new country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy6 View Post
I think this is a good rule by the IIHF. Guys shouldn't just be able to play for another country that they weren't born in, spent a large chunk of their youth in, or who don't have a parent who was born in that country. Allowing that to happen would severely cheapen international hockey.
The IIHF rules don't make any mention of the player's birthplace, let alone his parents' birthplace, both of which seem completely irrelevant.

The IIHF does allow that to happen. All it takes for a player like the one you describe is two full seasons in the league system of his new country, and of course a citizenship in that country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy6 View Post
In no way am I against dual citizens playing both sides like Brett Hull, Adam Deadmarsh, or Tyler Myers. That's a completely different scenerio.
Dual citizens still do have to play at least two seasons in the country they wish to represent, or else they're uneligible.

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09-05-2013, 02:07 PM
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Thesensation19
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I think he came over to play in the juniors right. So I am sure at one point some National Teams tried to recruit him over to a certain country. In soccer it happens successfully all the time.

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09-05-2013, 05:13 PM
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***EDIT*** I think I sorta misread the thread... Ya if Kopitar does have citzenship it looks like he would meet the requirements to switch and play for the US in Sochi. Vanek would not.

I think I remember similar rumours about Vanek. Whoever started those rumours wasn't familiar with the IIHF's rules regarding eligibility.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsboy11 View Post
That was a possiblity,...
Based on the IIHF's rules I don't think it was a possibility. Heading into the '10 Olympics Kopitar had played for Slovenia as recently as the '08 WC. For Kopitar to play for the US, along with obtaining American citizenship, he would needed to have played 4 consecutive years in the US and not played for Slovenia in any IIHF sanctioned tournaments during that same time period. As far as I know heading into the '10 Olympics Kopitar was 0 for 3 when it came to meeting the eligibility requirements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thesensation19 View Post
I think he came over to play in the juniors right.
Kopitar never played juniors in NA. His entire career in North America has been spent in the NHL.


Last edited by CoolForumNamePending: 09-05-2013 at 05:25 PM.
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09-05-2013, 05:53 PM
  #9
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I think it was actually Vanek, not Kopitar.

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09-11-2013, 08:06 AM
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Tomas W
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There is no way Kopitar will play for the USA, so you can drop that dream. tsk tsk people...

Kopitar played junior first in Slovenia and later in Sweden.

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09-17-2013, 03:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy6 View Post
I'm pretty sure that Kopitar already played for Slovenia in an IIHF tourney thus making him ineligible to play for anyone else. Bobby Holik tried to do that and was denied.

I think this is a good rule by the IIHF. Guys shouldn't just be able to play for another country that they weren't born in, spent a large chunk of their youth in, or who don't have a parent who was born in that country. Allowing that to happen would severely cheapen international hockey.

I can remember Peter Stastny and Petr Nedved playing for Canada and I never agreed with it. They're not Canadian. They weren't born here or trained here and shouldn't have been allowed to play for Canada.

Think of how many Canadians play in the States for the majority of their careers and eventually get US citizenship. Could you imagine what it would be like if a Gretzky or Lemieux or Yzerman had decided to suit up for the Americans at the end of their careers? That would have been stupid and would have completely turned me off of watching International hockey.

In no way am I against dual citizens playing both sides like Brett Hull, Adam Deadmarsh, or Tyler Myers. That's a completely different scenerio.

I saw Kopitar play in Austria at the world's as a 17 (?) year old. What are the rules on playing in official IIHF competitions and then switching allegiances?

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09-17-2013, 04:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt Russell Crowe View Post
I think it was actually Vanek, not Kopitar.
It was Vanek. Kopitar was never in the discussion to play for USA. Vanek was rumoured about 4 years ago, but it was never confirmed, since Vanek said that the rumour never came from him. End of story. End of thread.

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09-18-2013, 02:31 AM
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Tomas W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xokkeu View Post
I saw Kopitar play in Austria at the world's as a 17 (?) year old. What are the rules on playing in official IIHF competitions and then switching allegiances?
There is some kind of "quarantine" rules, you cant just switch national teams from one year to another. If you want to play for a new country, you will have to stay away from international comp. for quite a while.

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09-18-2013, 08:20 AM
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are either of these guys even US citizens? maybe we should start there first.because after gaining citizenship, they would have to play exclusively in the USA for 4 years in order to suit up for the USA.

Also, in their home countries theyre by far some the biggest sports stars, theres no way they would leave them to play for the USA to chase a gold medal.


Last edited by IIHFjerseycollector: 09-18-2013 at 08:43 PM.
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09-23-2013, 06:59 AM
  #15
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Originally Posted by Tomas W View Post
There is some kind of "quarantine" rules, you cant just switch national teams from one year to another. If you want to play for a new country, you will have to stay away from international comp. for quite a while.
For someone who gains a citizenship of the country they wish to represent, and they have already represented another NT in an IIHF sanctioned tournament (and even the junior ones count), it's four consecutive years of playing in a club that operates within the new country. The player can switch clubs within the country he or she wishes to represent at will, but in case of a transfer to another country within this time, the counter rolls back to zero.

For someone with no international representations (the Canada/World Cup doesn't count because it's not played under the IIHF), it's two years.

A player can only switch jerseys once. However, his or her original nationality doesn't count. This means that if they didn't represent their birth country, they can play for another (given that they comply for the two-year rule) and then switch back, if they fulfil the four-year requirement. For example, Petr Nedved did this. His international career started with representing Canada in -94 olympics (after playing three consecutive seasons for Vancouver Canucks) and then he retired from the NHL and went back to the Czech league in 2007 and player there for four seasons, and became eligible to represent his birth country for the 2012 WHC.

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10-07-2013, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by IIHFjerseycollector View Post
are either of these guys even US citizens? maybe we should start there first.because after gaining citizenship, they would have to play exclusively in the USA for 4 years in order to suit up for the USA.
Nothing in the rules say they have to get their citizenship before the 4 years in the new country.

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10-07-2013, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jekoh View Post
Nothing in the rules say they have to get their citizenship before the 4 years in the new country.
that is true thank you for pointing out my error. either way, I dont see these guys chasing a gold medal and leaving their countries hockey programs ever.

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10-09-2013, 07:48 PM
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IIHFjerseycollector View Post
are either of these guys even US citizens? maybe we should start there first.because after gaining citizenship, they would have to play exclusively in the USA for 4 years in order to suit up for the USA.

Also, in their home countries theyre by far some the biggest sports stars, theres no way they would leave them to play for the USA to chase a gold medal.
Then as soon as they played a game in a Canadian city they would be ineligible anyway.

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10-10-2013, 04:17 AM
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As pointed out before, the rules state that a dual citizen has to play four consecutive seasons for a team based in the country he wants to represent after the last time he played for his former national team.

As Kopitar hasn't played for Slovenia since 2008, and has played for a US based team since 2006, he would be eligible to play for the US as soon as he gains citizenship (unless there is a problem with him suiting up for Mora during the lockout, but I don't think that's the case).

Wether he actually wants to switch national team is a whole other story.

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10-10-2013, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy6 View Post
I think this is a good rule by the IIHF. Guys shouldn't just be able to play for another country that they weren't born in, spent a large chunk of their youth in, or who don't have a parent who was born in that country. Allowing that to happen would severely cheapen international hockey.

I can remember Peter Stastny and Petr Nedved playing for Canada and I never agreed with it. They're not Canadian. They weren't born here or trained here and shouldn't have been allowed to play for Canada.
Well, the IIHF as well as NHL sanctioned international competitions (see Tony Esposito and Trottier in the Canada Cup) disagrees with you.

Also what's with the bs about not being born here? I'd hope that never becomes a requirement to represent Canada internationally. Canada is a country of immigrants and if an athlete fulfills the requirements to gain citizenship as well as the rules of their sporting body, then they have every right to wear the maple-leaf.

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10-10-2013, 10:33 PM
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KirkW View Post
Well, the IIHF as well as NHL sanctioned international competitions (see Tony Esposito and Trottier in the Canada Cup) disagrees with you.

Also what's with the bs about not being born here? I'd hope that never becomes a requirement to represent Canada internationally. Canada is a country of immigrants and if an athlete fulfills the requirements to gain citizenship as well as the rules of their sporting body, then they have every right to wear the maple-leaf.
Born, no. Trained, yes. Otherwise you literally have guys choose where they want to play. Unless there are strict rules in place it will be exploited like no other.

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