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Playing Wing on Olympic Ice:

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09-09-2013, 10:36 AM
  #1
halpinhe
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Playing Wing on Olympic Ice:

Hello all,
Men's league is starting up again over here, and we have a token few games on Olympic sized rinks. I think I've got my defensive positioning down on normal ice as a winger, but I'm wondering if anyone has any tips to provide for playing on the big ice? Last time I played on big ice I was such a beginner that all I could worry about was making sure to change quickly because of how much farther the benches are than usual.
Is it safest (keeping in mind that I am not a particularly strong skater) to basically restrict myself to the same width of the ice as I'm used to when covering point men and just give them the outside? Is there more of an onus placed on covering the area in the vicinity of the face-off circle given how more extra space our centre has to handle?

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09-09-2013, 10:51 AM
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get in better shape, do cardio workouts loll

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09-09-2013, 11:04 AM
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sanityplease
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halpinhe View Post
Hello all,
Men's league... Is it safest (keeping in mind that I am not a particularly strong skater) to basically restrict myself to the same width of the ice as I'm used to when covering point men and just give them the outside? Is there more of an onus placed on covering the area in the vicinity of the face-off circle given how more extra space our centre has to handle?
More passes occur in open ice (vs. boards) on larger ice. But you still want to be able to cover your position on the half boards to pick up passes/clears from your defense, especially if they're in trouble.

Cover the dman when they have the puck & give your defense an easy outlet option when your team has the puck.

Basically you have to skate more.

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09-09-2013, 02:54 PM
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Depends what level you're at.

I find in my beginner level that you really have to do a good job supporting the middle of the ice in the d-zone. The large range of skating ability in beer leagues mean the better skaters on their team have more room to circle the zone and try to create. The defensemen at the blue line along the wall is less of a threat, but the additional room offers a lot more opportunities for cycles and cutters. Further, man you are gonna get tired when the puck switches possession on the far-boards. You gotta haul butt from middle of the ice to your boards to support the breakout if that's your system.

For opportunities, to try and cut off some D-to-D passes. Those extra 13' can throw d-men off and make some additional mistakes that can lead to a clean and clear breakaway.

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09-09-2013, 03:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleepy View Post
Depends what level you're at.

I find in my beginner level that you really have to do a good job supporting the middle of the ice in the d-zone. The large range of skating ability in beer leagues mean the better skaters on their team have more room to circle the zone and try to create. The defensemen at the blue line along the wall is less of a threat, but the additional room offers a lot more opportunities for cycles and cutters. Further, man you are gonna get tired when the puck switches possession on the far-boards. You gotta haul butt from middle of the ice to your boards to support the breakout if that's your system.

For opportunities, to try and cut off some D-to-D passes. Those extra 13' can throw d-men off and make some additional mistakes that can lead to a clean and clear breakaway.
Yah, I would think a good strategy in lower leagues would be to dare the point men to shoot since nobody has a cannon. I think I'd play in between my point man and the puck, always be in position to deny a pass to him and as soon as your team takes possession you need to be in position to receive a pass to put pressure on the dmen. Make them uncomfortable to set up shop in your zone, make them keep their head on a swivel and try not to put yourself in a position where you're possibly receiving suicide passes (skate east/west not north south).


Last edited by The Tikkanen: 09-09-2013 at 09:25 PM.
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09-09-2013, 08:44 PM
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halpinhe
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Thanks for all the replies folks. I hadn't thought of the fact that basically every assignment is the same, only involving more skating
I'll try to take into account the fact that D-men will find that nice long D to D pass pretty appealing and see if I can pick a couple off.

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09-10-2013, 01:45 PM
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I play wing and I always make sure to know who the dman I'm playing against that shift is. If he's good I'll play more sound, technical hockey. If he's not good or slow I'll take more chances to try to expose his weakness. If he's got a cannon I'll stick right on him to make sure he doesn't get to use it and if he has a weak shot I'll collapse down farther and dare the other team pass him the puck.

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09-14-2013, 12:13 PM
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I have the opposite problem, being a winger who plays and trains on Olympic-sized ice week in, week out.

I was over in NA last month and managed to grab a few pick up games on NHL-sized pads and whilst (having learnt to play on big ice) I felt very fast, once settled in the offensive zone trying to cycle the puck I felt quite constricted.

Playing in a checking rec league, where many opposition teams have smaller home ice (there are some tiny, non-standard rinks in the UK) we find that when they come to our ice they often seem to get a little lost in the neutral zone, playing either very narrow and passing the puck into each others heels on the break-out or over compensating and playing very wide but shallow, not pushing a man far enough forward to put move the puck forward quickly, meaning they can run out of gas before the offensive blue line.

It is amazing how used to certain angles you get training and playing on your own ice and how difficult it can be adjusting to smaller/larger pads.

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09-14-2013, 12:38 PM
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howeaboutthat
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I have the opposite problem, being a winger who plays and trains on Olympic-sized ice week in, week out.

I was over in NA last month and managed to grab a few pick up games on NHL-sized pads and whilst (having learnt to play on big ice) I felt very fast, once settled in the offensive zone trying to cycle the puck I felt quite constricted.

Playing in a checking rec league, where many opposition teams have smaller home ice (there are some tiny, non-standard rinks in the UK) we find that when they come to our ice they often seem to get a little lost in the neutral zone, playing either very narrow and passing the puck into each others heels on the break-out or over compensating and playing very wide but shallow, not pushing a man far enough forward to put move the puck forward quickly, meaning they can run out of gas before the offensive blue line.

It is amazing how used to certain angles you get training and playing on your own ice and how difficult it can be adjusting to smaller/larger pads.

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