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How to buy a hockey stick

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Old
11-17-2006, 12:12 PM
  #26
the_pen_is_mightier
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melubsdonna View Post
I'm a beginner at hockey and I want to buy a composite stick.
Just by reading this alone, I wouldn't recommend going straight to a composite. As much as most would like to think that they're better shooters with one, it's simply not always the case.
Yes, they're technologically advanced, however, they're usually of benefit to experienced players, i.e.; those who already know how to shoot a puck.
I'd recommend a good wooden, or wood/fiberglass combo, stick to start off. And go with a mild curve, nothing too extreme to start off.
Shooting requires lots of practice, and there's a good chance that you'll break a stick or two. Would you want it to be a $200 one? Also, at first, you'll shank many, many shots, even if you have a high-end composite, and then what? It just proves that the stick wasn't worth it...yet.
You're a beginner, so use a stick more suited for beginners. Use the higher-end sticks when your game is at a higher-level.

Just some advice...but if you are stuck on going with a composite, the information already posted is very informative.

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11-17-2006, 05:49 PM
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_pen_is_mightier View Post
Just by reading this alone, I wouldn't recommend going straight to a composite. As much as most would like to think that they're better shooters with one, it's simply not always the case.
Yes, they're technologically advanced, however, they're usually of benefit to experienced players, i.e.; those who already know how to shoot a puck.
I'd recommend a good wooden, or wood/fiberglass combo, stick to start off. And go with a mild curve, nothing too extreme to start off.
Shooting requires lots of practice, and there's a good chance that you'll break a stick or two. Would you want it to be a $200 one? Also, at first, you'll shank many, many shots, even if you have a high-end composite, and then what? It just proves that the stick wasn't worth it...yet.
You're a beginner, so use a stick more suited for beginners. Use the higher-end sticks when your game is at a higher-level.

Just some advice...but if you are stuck on going with a composite, the information already posted is very informative.
Definitely good advice. What are some of you guys favourite wood stick?

For me, I kinda like the Nike-Bauer Flexlites. I'm using a Flexlite 8 with normal flex and a Naslund curve right now, though I though the Flexlite 10 has a better feel to it. The CCM Vector 40 is also nice, but its blade feels a bit flimsy compared to the Flexlite.

Have also heard good things about the Easton Z-Carbon and the Sherwood... forgot which one that is. The 6 or 9000 series with the Crosby/Coffey Curve.

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11-17-2006, 06:48 PM
  #28
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Originally Posted by Bonzai12 View Post
Alright...Have been using a One Piece Innovative Hull stick for the past year. Fell in love with how light, Wippy, and the curve it had on it.

Bad thing. Once the wear and tear Finally takes its toll on the stick, you find yourself having to buy another complete stick, which if your going for another one piece ranges from 120 and up.

The Blade on the Innovative got very thin, and ended up going to Peranis Hockey World earlier today. My Plan was to go in and just buy a Blade by Warrior ( Used to be Innovative), and just cut off the blade of the one piece. But after really thinking about it the stick wouldnt have the same kick point because i would have to turn the stick over to put the blade in.

Ended up coming to a fine conclusion, buying a Two piece ( Shaft and Blade). Bought a CCM Vector V 6.0 Shaft for 60 Bucks, and a Warrior AK27 Draper Blade for 40 bucks today. After playing and getting used to the Stick and Blade Combo for 6 Hours, I have my new Favorite Weapon.

At First i was skeptic about getting the 2 piece, thinking it might be a bit Blade heavy, which i really cant stand while stick handling. But with the AK Blade (159 Grams) and the Shaft, I really didnt feel much weight difference betweent the 2pc. and the Innovative.

Like another Poster said earlier, Go with the 2 Piece. Really allows you to try different Blade Patterns, as many have their own Preference as to how they like to shoot. I myself Have always used a Wood Stick or a One piece. Way to many Sticks i have gone through. But now Find myself

CCM Vector 6.0 Shaft.
http://www.hockeyworld.com/prodHome....tID=173&shop=1

AK27 Blade by Warrior
http://www.hockeyworld.com/prodHome....tID=146&shop=1


http://www.hockeyworld.com/b_about.ihtml?step=3

This will open up a Page and to the right will tell you alot about Blades, Shafts and Sticks... Will Answer alot of questions.

Good luck man, and hopefully you find the stick you really feel comfortable using.
Actually Bonzai unless it was an Innovative True One OPS you could have pulled th eblade out at the fuse point and re-used the shaft. Could have bought the Hull tapered pro stock blades and they would have fit right in and you would'nt have know the difference. Only reasont o filp the stick would have been to put a standard blade in and theres no point in that.

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Old
12-29-2006, 12:28 PM
  #29
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best wood stick ever made is the Easton Z-Carbon

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Old
12-29-2006, 01:25 PM
  #30
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i got my ccm v5.0 blade (thornton curve) yesterday and put it in my synergy II shaft and it has an amazing feel. i feel a huge increase in power and whip to my wrister. i also have a v2 in naslund and its a pretty good stick, but is nothing close to my synergy. i suggest you look into the easton typhoon, ultralite, or z-bubble shaft with a z-carbon blade. personally, i like the yzerman curve and now the thornton curve as well. i started off with a jagr curve back in my elementary school days and progressed to the shanahan (only curve they had at sports authority) and then the yzerman/thornton.

thanks to those who helped me with my blade situation last week.

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Old
12-30-2006, 01:07 PM
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berger_4_ View Post
best wood stick ever made is the Easton Z-Carbon
I bought one yesterday off this advice, look forward to trying it out.

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Old
12-30-2006, 01:59 PM
  #32
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Originally Posted by sc37 View Post
V2 and VIII are the same stick...the VIII has some of the Bauer Endure-like features that'll supposedly help durability, but that's arguable.

Btw...since you mention the XX..are the custom color ones the same price as a normal XX?

No, the custom color XX's are a bit more money, but still cheaper then a XXX.

To answer the orignal question. Either go with a wood stick or a cheap shaft/blade combo. You won't reap the benifits of a nice OPS for a few years, not will you be able to tell the difference other then the weight.

Personally I'd go with some cheap wood sticks for now.

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Old
04-12-2010, 01:14 PM
  #33
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bringing an old thread back, didnt want to start a new one.

just got two new easton one piece sticks form hockey monkey. and they seem to have some slight indentations on them, one is right in middle of shaft. and some of the paint job looks like it is bubbling a little.

should i be concerned at all about the sticks holding up? should i return them. i have had others that i dont raelly remember having these slight blemishes. they could have, but i just dont remember

thanks for the help

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Old
04-12-2010, 02:39 PM
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melubsdonna View Post
Hey guys,

I'm a beginner at hockey and I want to buy a composite stick. I'm not a total newb, I play floor hockey relatively well, but I just started ice hockey.

I don't know anything about hockey sticks. I want something that is light, durable, high performance, and good on the buck. Also, looks is a plus =).

Although i'm a beginner, I don't mind using a good quality stick and grow into it. Unless there is something terribly wrong with that.

As an added tip, could you guys let me know what stick you personally use and why you like that stick? Thanks a bunch guys!
When you buy a composite, you will probably have to go through this...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rzGyWC5C0E

Good luck!
Head coach

PS: it's probably not a cheap fix!

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Last edited by Headcoach: 04-13-2010 at 05:53 AM.
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Old
04-12-2010, 07:06 PM
  #35
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To sum up, you want to base your buying decision on:
  1. Curve Patterns
  2. Flex
  3. Length
Material is also a factor, but you probably won't be able to tell the difference at first. If you buy a one piece composite, experimenting with different blade patterns can be very costly, so I would start with a two, and use a blade that is moderate/med in most categories and adjust from there. Flex is measured as how many lbs of pressure are required to bend the stick 1"--try to find one that has a little give when you are setting up for a wrist shot, but doesn't bend too easily. If you aren't sure what length, start with about the chin on skates and adjust from there. Be careful, because cutting the stick will change the flex, making it stiffer. As far as looks go, you're on your own. Good luck!


Last edited by budster: 04-12-2010 at 09:21 PM.
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Old
04-12-2010, 09:16 PM
  #36
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I went to my local hockey shop (Flyers Skate Zone) and told the guy I was a newbie and that I wasn't sure what I wanted. The guy there who seemed bored out of his skull took it upon myself to explain everything to me from flex to kick points and lie to OPS to blade/shaft combos and all points in between. He even let me mess around with some of the sticks in the lobby of the skate zone. The dude was awesome.

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Old
04-12-2010, 09:44 PM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by budster View Post
To sum up, you want to base your buying decision on:
  1. Curve Patterns
  2. Flex
  3. Length
Material is also a factor, but you probably won't be able to tell the difference at first. If you buy a one piece composite, experimenting with different blade patterns can be very costly, so I would start with a two, and use a blade that is moderate/med in most categories and adjust from there. Flex is measured as how many lbs of pressure are required to bend the stick 1"--try to find one that has a little give when you are setting up for a wrist shot, but doesn't bend too easily. If you aren't sure what length, start with about the chin on skates and adjust from there. Be careful, because cutting the stick will change the flex, making it stiffer. As far as looks go, you're on your own. Good luck!
Three most important things are lie, lie, and lie.

Curves, you can adjust to. Some are vary slightly.
Flex, has some baring on your play, but you can still play effectively with a flex not to your liking.
Length, thins called a hacksaw corrects pretty quickly.

The wrong lie will have a bigger impact on your shooting and puck control then all three of those others combined.

1 Lie (make sure it's correct)
2 Flex (the proper flex can have a big impact on your shooting)
3 Lie (it's seriously that important)

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Old
04-12-2010, 09:52 PM
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
When you buy a composite, you will probably will have to go through this...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rzGyWC5C0E

Good luck!
Head coach

PS: it's probably not a cheap fix!
I wouldn't scare someone new off with the broken composite scare. Not ALL composites break just looking at them. I personally would never buy a $200+ stick because you are asking for being irritated with a broken stick, they make the material so thin it is ridiculous.

Most composites are just fine, do not fear them.

The most reliable are two piece sticks, my opinion from seeing others who go through one piece sticks. Also replacing a blade for $40-$50 is much easier than buying a new $150 stick.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 04-12-2010 at 09:59 PM.
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Old
04-13-2010, 01:04 AM
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stick9 View Post
Three most important things are lie, lie, and lie.

Curves, you can adjust to. Some are vary slightly.
Good point about lie, I should have said BLADE patterns of which lie is an included attribute. I still dunno if it's that much more important than flex . Take a skinny guy that's 5'6" who buys a 100 flex stick up to his nose then cuts it 3", effectively making it ~110. He may never be able to shoot hard to his full potential.

I say this not to debate which element is the most important, but to emphasize when choosing a stick, all factors should be considered.

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Old
04-13-2010, 06:04 AM
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
I wouldn't scare someone new off with the broken composite scare.
Well, I guess the operative word is...New! Here my two cents. I would recommend a wooden stick first. Learn how to play the game first before you go out and spend money on looks. No body cares what your stick looks like! However, everyone cares whether the new guy can pass the puck or not.

Trust me when I tell you, the fans up in the stands don't really give a sh** if you have a good looking stick. Can you shoot, pass, puck assist? Oh, here the big one...can you skate?

Not to be a tool, but If you are a beginner, learn with a wooden stick first before you go invest in a good looking stick.

Head coach

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Old
04-13-2010, 07:25 AM
  #41
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How do you choose your lie? Is there any method to it, or do you just base it off whether you hunch over a lot?

And to OP, no idea about your weight/strength, but flex is a huge deal if you're small and not terribly strong. I was using 100 flexes for about 3,4 years starting with my first composite and I finally got an 85 flex last boxing day. The difference is night and day, shooting makes "sense" now lol. I only wish I could find something a bit whippier.

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04-13-2010, 09:06 AM
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by budster View Post
Good point about lie, I should have said BLADE patterns of which lie is an included attribute. I still dunno if it's that much more important than flex . Take a skinny guy that's 5'6" who buys a 100 flex stick up to his nose then cuts it 3", effectively making it ~110. He may never be able to shoot hard to his full potential.

I say this not to debate which element is the most important, but to emphasize when choosing a stick, all factors should be considered.
I agree in theory. He'll shoot to the best of his ability, he just won't gain any advantages from the stick itself.

Brett Hull used a 70-75 flex stick, I believe Ovechkin uses something close to that. If you went strictly by height and weight both would be using 110 flex or greater.

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04-13-2010, 09:11 AM
  #43
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Originally Posted by gc View Post
How do you choose your lie? Is there any method to it, or do you just base it off whether you hunch over a lot?
Get in a ready position and hold your stick. Observe how it 'lies' on the ground. Does it seem to feel comfortable when it's flat or does it feel more natural heelside/toeside? If the latter then adjust accordingly. Tape your stick blade then go play one game of street hockey (on skates). If the tape wears on the heel, get a lower lie. If it wears on the toe use a higher lie. In case anyone is wondering why this is important, it is because having the correct lie translates to having ALL of your stick blade on the ice.

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Old
04-13-2010, 10:00 AM
  #44
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Here's my long-winded series about buying a hockey stick

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Old
04-13-2010, 11:29 AM
  #45
Ozolinsh_27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stick9 View Post
1 Lie (make sure it's correct)
2 Flex (the proper flex can have a big impact on your shooting)
3 Lie (it's seriously that important)
I agree completely. I had a fiasco around 6 years ago where I switched blades from a 5 lie to what the store clerk thought was a 5 lie, but was really a 5.5 - back then the lies weren't printed very often on the shaft so it was kind of a guessing game if you ran into a store clerk who didn't know the ins/outs of stick selection.

I had the most trouble with stickhandling, it was ridiculously frustrating when puck inexplicably slid off the heel of the blade compared to the previous stick. Count that with the occasional flubbed passes and I was furious for the entire year until I found an identical matching blade again.

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Old
04-13-2010, 01:28 PM
  #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Well, I guess the operative word is...New! Here my two cents. I would recommend a wooden stick first. Learn how to play the game first before you go out and spend money on looks. No body cares what your stick looks like! However, everyone cares whether the new guy can pass the puck or not.

Trust me when I tell you, the fans up in the stands don't really give a sh** if you have a good looking stick. Can you shoot, pass, puck assist? Oh, here the big one...can you skate?

Not to be a tool, but If you are a beginner, learn with a wooden stick first before you go invest in a good looking stick.

Head coach
Wood sticks are getting rather hard to find. Go online and find an 85 flex in a non-coffey pattern... Go ahead, I'll wait.

Add in shipping(because you have a worse chance at finding one locally, in nearly any area) and you're spending too much for a stick that isn't going to last a whole long time.

I'm not a beginner player and I still get a whole lot more use out of a $120-150 pro stock stick than I would get out of $200 worth of wood sticks. The blades simply don't stay stiff long enough.

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Old
04-13-2010, 02:13 PM
  #47
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Any thoughts on the Easton S15 blade durability/performance wise? Recently my One95 blade broke and I have a One95 shaft but hard to find the blade I like in-stock so I decided Id go with the Easton S15 blade which APPARENTLY is about 30 grams lighter which may be nice.

Obviously both are standard so fit should not be an issue more than anything I am concerned about durability, and possibly performance with the One95 shaft if anyone has experience with this combination.

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04-13-2010, 03:17 PM
  #48
Ozolinsh_27
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Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
Wood sticks are getting rather hard to find. Go online and find an 85 flex in a non-coffey pattern... Go ahead, I'll wait.
It probably depends on what area of North America everyone lives in, up in Canada its not hard to find a wood stick.

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Old
04-13-2010, 03:21 PM
  #49
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In Minnesota it's next to impossible to find a wood stick nowadays. Especially if you need one that's 70-ish flex but don't want the blade to torque way open on slappers.

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Old
04-13-2010, 06:39 PM
  #50
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As someone who just recently started, my advice is to try just about everything. When I went to my local hockey shop, I tried as many flexes, lies and curves as I could. I went with a Warrior Bentley with a 5.5 lie and the Draper curve (the Sakic equivalent I believe) in a 95 flex. Another thing that drew me towards it was the low price, it was only $75 USD and the weight, which many people see as a drawback but I liked the sturdy feel. Like many people have stated, I thought it would be dumb to go buy a One95 or a Dolomite when chances are it's going to break and I won't notice any difference in that stick anyway. Just go to a local shop, ask for help and you'll most likely not be disappointed with your purchase.

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